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Full text of "School of Medicine Catalog 1911-1924"


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/medicine11unse 







UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH 
ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF THE 

School of Medicine 



N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SESSION 1911 - 1912 



BALTIMORE 
ir.LIAMS A WTLKINS COMPANY 

1911 



CALENDAR 



One Hundred and Fifth Annual Session. 

1911. 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University Hospital. 
October 2. — Regular Session begins. 

October 16. — Re-examination of Deficient Students and Examina- 
tion for Advanced Standing. 
November 30. — Thanksgiving Day, Holiday. 
December 22. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 



CHRISTMAS RECESS. 

1912. 

January 3. — Lectures resumed. 9 a.m. 
February 22. — Holiday. 
May 15. — Final Examinations begin. 

June 1 (about). — Commencement, Annual Meeting of Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor, or Master of Arts or Sciences. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. This school 
was established in Baltimore, Md., in 1807, and offers a high-grade 
course in medicine, extending over a period of four years, and leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The Department of Dentistry was founded in 1882, and 
is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral part of the 
School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1840 as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated with the School 
of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers two years, and leads 
to the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

BERNARD CARTER, LL.D., Provost. 
F. J. S. Gorgas, M.D., D.D.S. D. M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D. John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D, 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D. 
Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. Daniel Base, Ph.D. 

Edgar H. Gans, LL.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Hon. J. Wirt Randall, LL.D. Hon. Henry Stockb ridge, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Philemon H. Tuck, Esq. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.CL. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. Edgar A. Poe, Esq. 
J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Hon. John C. Rose. Joseph C. France, Esq. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. AUSTIN L. CROTHERS, LL.D. 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Pro-Chancellor, 
HON. BERNARD CARTER, LL.D. 

The V ice-Chancellor, 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.CL. 

President of St John's College. 

PROFESSORS B. V. CECIL, A.M., Sc.D., and C. W. STRYKER, A.M. 
For St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., and 
RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

For School of Medicine. 

PROFESSORS HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., and W. T. BRANTLY, A.M. 

For School of Law. 

PROFESSOR T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 
For School of Dentistry. 

PROFESSOR CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 
For School of Pharmacy. 

3 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Medicine. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. Dean ot 
the Faculty. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Chas. W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine and Diseases of 
Children. 

Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Women. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy and Clinical Surgery. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Surgical Pathol- 
ogy. 

Jos. L. Hirsh, B.A., M.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and Visit- 
ing Pathologist to the University Hospital. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Eugene F. Cordell, A.M., M.D., Professor of the History of Medicine, and 
Librarian. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Harry Adler, B.A., M.D., Professor of Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine- 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and 
Hygiene. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

St. Clair Spruill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, B.A., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, and Associate Profes- 
sor of Physical Therapeutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

F. M. Chisolm, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology. 

4 



J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor and Demonstrator of Anatomy and 

Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 
Nathan Winslow, B.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 
Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
Wm. D. Scott, Jr., M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
G. C. Lockard, M.D., Associate in Medicine, and Director of the Clinical 

Laboratory. 

E. H. Kloman, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

Page Edmunds, M.D. Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Wm. Tarun, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Lecturer on Clinical Medicine. 
H. C. Hyde, M.D., Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology. 
R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Lecturer on Histology and Embryology, and Associate 
x. Pathologist, University Hospital. 

H. W. Stoner, M.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology. 

G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., A. H. Carroll, M.D., Demonstrators of Physiology. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology and Embryology. 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Demonstrator of Materia Medica. 

John A. Tompkins, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Minor Surgery and Bandaging. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. D. Reeder, M.D., Instructor in Osteology and Proctology. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

M. J. Cromwell, M.D., Instructor in Clinical Surgery. 

J. F. Hawkins, M.D., G. M. Settle, M.D., Instructors in Neurology. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., J. F. O'Mara, M.D., H. W. 

Jones, M.D., H. D. McCarty, M.D., Instructors in Medicine. 
J. Holmes Smith, Jr., M.D., C. C. Smink, M.D., Instructors in Osteology. 

F. S. Lynn, M.D., F. J. Kirby, M.D., Instructors in Surgery. 
Henry Chandlee, M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Leo Karlinsky, M.D., Assistants in Pathology and 
Bacteriology. 

W. F. Sowers, M.D., H. W. Brent, M.D. Assistants in Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

J. Holmes Smith, Jr., M.D., G. M. Settle, M.D., R. G. Willse, M.D., 
Assistant Demonstrators of Anatomy. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Physiology. 
H. U. Todd, M.D., Assistant in ClinicalPathology. 

J. Holmes Smith, Jr., M.D., Prosector to the Professor of Anatomy. 

5 



Dispensary Physicians and Chiefs of Clinics. 



Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Chief of Out-Patient Department. 

John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

G. C. Lockard, M.D., H. U. Todd, M.D., S. R. Clarke, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic 
to the Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics. 

J. K. Inslet, M.D., C. C. Smink, M.D., F. Levinson, M.D., H. M. Robinson, 
M. D., J. H. Von Dreele, M.D., J. E. O'Neill, M.D., Assistants. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery, M. J. Cromwell, 
M.D., John A. Tompkins, Jr., M.D., J. Fred. Adams, M.D., J. Holmes 
Smith, Jr., M.D., J. D. Reeder, M.D., F. S. Lynn, M.D., Assistants. 

E. H. Kloman M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Obstetrics. 

W. K. White, M.D., H. W. Brent, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willbe, 
M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of Women, E. S. Per- 
kins, M.D., Assistant. 

Wm. Tarum, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 

J. R. Abercrombie, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the 
Stomach. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose. H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

Arthur De T. Valk, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Orthopedic 
Surgery. Howard E. Ashbury, M.D., Assistant. 

Wm. D. Scott, Jr., M.D., Chief of Clinic of Genito-Urinary Diseases. A. J. 
Underhill, M.D., Assistant. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Neurology and Psy- 
chiatry, J. F. Hawkins, M.D., A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistants. 

J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Proctology. 



Mr. A. D. Johnson, Secretary to the Dean and Superintendent of College 
Buildings. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest institutions of medical education in America, having been 
chartered in 1807, under the title of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land. 

Five years later, in 1812, by authority of the General Assembly 
of Maryland, the College of Medicine of Maryland was empowered 
to annex to itself three other colleges or faculties, viz: The Faculty 
of Divinity, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four faculties or colleges thus united were "constituted an 
University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

The Medical School of the University is thus its oldest department 
and ranks fifth, in point of age, among the medical colleges of the 
United States. 

Throughout the century of its existence it has always taken 
rank as one of the leading medical colleges of the South, and among 
the most widely known and most highly honored of the schools 
of medicine of the country. 

Beginning with the modest number of five, composing the first 
graduating class in 1810, the fist of graduates in medicine of the 
University of Maryland, now numbers five thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-one names, drawn from all parts of the United States 
and from abroad, among which are to be found some of the most 
noted names connected with the history of medicine in our country. 

While from the foundation of the University of Maryland, the 
policy of the Faculty of Physic has been one of wise conservatism, 
it has, at the same time, never been behindhand in the march of 
educational progress, and while retaining for so long a time as they 
were of real value, those features of older educational methods which 
were wisest and best, they have often been first, and always among 
the first, in the adoption of all measures tending to improvement in 
methods of medical teaching, and to true elevation of the standard 
of medical education. 



In illustration of this we may mention the following facts: 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland was th« 
first medical school in America to make dissecting a compulsory 
part of the curriculum. [1833.] 

It established one of the first Medical Libraries and the first 
Medical College Library in the country. [1813.] 

It was among the first to teach Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence. 
[1883.] 

It was the first to give instruction in Dentistry. [1837.] 

It was among the first to meet the modern demand for instruction 
in specialties. [1866.] 

It was the first medical school in America to establish separate 
and independent chairs of Diseases of Women and Children [January, 
1867], and of Eye and Ear Diseases. [1873.] 

It was among the very first to provide for adequate clinical instruc- 
tion by the erection of its own hospital, available at all times for the 
use of the students. [1823.] 

It is the aim of the present Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland to carry out this policy established by its predecessors. 

With this end in view, the Faculty has, in the last few years, 
expended, and is now expending, large amounts in the establishment 
and equipment of its Lying-in Hospital, its Laboratories of Chemistry, 
Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, in the erection of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, which was completed in 1897, and in the erection of 
a new Laboratory Building, just completed, and is therefore in a 
position to offer to students of medicine and graduates a course of 
combined didactic, clinical and laboratory instruction which will 
compare favorably with that offered by any medical school in the 
United States. 

The details of this course will be found in the following announce- 
ment of the one hundred and fifth annual course of instruction 
of the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTH ANNUAL 
COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

SESSION 1911-1912. 

The One Hundred and Fifth Annual Session of the School of 
Medicine. of the University of Maryland will begin on Monday, 
October 2, 1911, and terminate on June 1, 1912. During the session 
there is a vacation from December 22, 1911, to January 3, 1912, and 
there are no lectures on Thanksgiving Day and Washington's Birth- 
day. 

Clinical lectures introductory to the regular session are given 
daily throughout September. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Four annual graded courses of not less than eight months each 
will be required for graduation. Every applicant for advanced 
standing will be required to present satisfactory evidence of having 
attended courses reasonably equivalent to those already attended 
by the class to which he seeks admission; to be examined for admis- 
sion in all the subjects in which the said class shall have been exam- 
ined already, or to present satisfactory certificates of having passed 
successfully examinations upon those subjects. Opportunity for 
taking such examinations will be afforded previous to the opening 
of each annual session. 

The system of instruction for the four years' graded course, with 
the number of hours in each week devoted to each subject, is shown 
in the following schedule: 

First Year. 
S Physiology. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. Dr. Conser. 

Demonstrations, 3 hours. Dr. Conser. 
V Chemistry. — Illustrated lectures on General Chemistry, 2 hours. Prof. Coaie, 

Laboratory work, 6 hours. Prof. Base. 
y Anatomy. — Lectures and Recitations, 3 hours. Prof. Smith. 
./ Osteology. — Recitations and demonstrations in class sections, 2 hours. In- 
structors in Osteology. 
Dissections, by class sections, daily, 2\ hours. Prof. Holland and assistants. 
*/ Ma*eria Medica.— Lectures and recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Shipley, Labora- 
tory work, 1 hour. Dr. Sinsky. 
v Normal Histology and Embryology.— Laboratory work and Demonstrations, G 
hours. Dr. Maldeis and assistants. 
History of Medicine, 1 hour. — Prof. Cordell. 

The class divisions are so arranged that work in the laboratories 
and dissecting-room is evenly distributed throughout the term. 

9 



At the end of the first year examinations are held in Osteology 
Anatomy, Physiology, and the Laboratory Courses in Chemistry, 
Histology and Embryology. 

Second Year. 

v Physiology. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. Prof. Hemmeter. 

Laboratory work, 3 hours. Dr. Conser. 

Surgery. — Bandaging and application of surgical apparatus, 3 hours, in class, 
sections. Dr. Tompkins. 

y Chemistry. — Illustrated lectures on Organic and Physiological Chemistry, 1 
hour. Prof. Coale. 

Laboratory work, 4 hours. 
< Anatomy. — Lectures, recitations and demonstrations, 3 hours. Prof. Smith. 

Dissections by class sections, daily 22 hours. Prof. Holland and assistants. 
v Materia Medica. — Lectures and Recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Shipley. 

Laboratory work, 2 hours, Prof. Shipley and Dr. Sinsky. 
\ Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene, 1 hour. Prof. J. T. Smith. 

Bacteriology. — Lectures and Laboratory work, 10 hours, half session. Prof. 
Hirsh and assistants. 
'>/ Pathology. — Lectures and demonstrations, 1 hour. Prof. Hirsh. 

Laboratory work, 6 hours, Prof. Hirsh and Assistants. 

Physical Diagnosis. — Class sections, 1 hour. Dr. Lockard. 

At the end of the second term the student, before being admitted 
to the third year's class, must stand final examinations in Anatomy, 
Materia Medica, Physiology, Chemistry, Medical Jurisprudence and 
Hygiene, General Pathology, Bacteriology, State Medicine, the 
application of surgical apparatus and bandaging and all Laboratory 
Courses. He must also produce evidence that his work in the dis- 
secting-room and laboratories has been satisfactory. Should he fail 
to pass a successful examination in any of these branches, a second 
opportunity will be afforded him at the opening of the regular session 
in the autumn; failing in this, such studies for the second year must 
be repeated. 

Third Year, 
i/ Practice of Medicine. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. Prof. Mitchell. 
Clinical Lectures and Conferences at University Hospital 1 hour. Associate 
Professors Clinical Medicine. 

Diseases of Children. — Clinical Conferences at University Hospital, 1 
hour. Prof. Mitchell. 
Y Diseases of Women. — Lectures and Recitations, 1 hour, Prof. Ashby. Clin- 
ical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Ashby. 

Physical Diagnosis. — Class sections, 1 hour. Instructors in medicine. 
v/ Eye and Ear Diseases.— Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 1 hour 

Prof. Woods. 
y Surgery. — Lectures and Recitations on general surgery, 3 hours. Prof. Shipley. 
Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Winslow and assistants. 

10 



Demonstrations in Operative Surgery in class seotions, 1 hour. Profs. Martin, 
Spruill, and N. Winslow. 
• Obstetrics. — Lectures, 2 hours. Prof. Neale. 

Demonstrations, practical instruction with the manikin, and recitations, 1 
hour. 
Clinical Obstetrics at Maternity Hospital, 1 hour. 
Therapeutics. — Lectures and Recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Adler. 
Physical Therapeutics. — Lectures and Recitations, 1 hour. Prof. Gichner. 
>/ Special Pathology — Lectures and demonstrations, 4 hours. Prof. Hirsh. 
Laboratory work and demonstrations, 6 hours, half session. Prof. Hirsh 
and assistants. 
S Neurology. — Lectures, 1 hour. Prof. Spear. 

Special Clinics. — Diseases of the Nervous System, 1 hour. Prof. Spear. 
V Clinical Pathology. — Class sections, 6 hours. Dr. Lockard. 

At the end of the third session the student is admitted to exam- 
ination in Principles and Practice of Medicine, Therapeutics, Obstet- 
rics, Diseases of Women, Principles of Surgery, Pathology, Operative 
Surgery, and Clinical Pathology. 

Fourth Year. 

Practice of Medicine. — Clinical Lectures and Conferences at University 
Hospital 2 hours. Prof. Wilson. 

Clinical lectures, Bayview Hospital. Profs, of Clinical Medicine. 

Ward and Dispensary Instruction, 6 hours. Professors of Clinical Medicine. 

Diseases of Children. — Lectures and recitations, 1 hour. Prof. Mitchell. 

Clinical Conference, 1 hour. Prof. Mitchell. 

Dispensary instruction, 1 hour, class sections. Prof. Mitchell and assistants. 

Diseases of Women. — Clinical lectures, Ward and Dispensary instruction, 4 
hours. Profs. Ashby and Hundley. 

Eye and Ear Diseases. — Lectures, 2 hours. Prof. Woods. 

Clinical lecture, 1 hour, class sections, Prof. Woods. 

Demonstrations, Eye and Ear Hospital, 2 hours. Drs. Chisoim, Gibbons, 
Fleming, and Johnston. 

Demonstrations, Eye and Ear Dispensary, 1 hour. 

Surgery. — Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Winslow 
and assistants. 

Lecture and Clinical Conference in Surgery, 3 hours. Prof. Winslow. 

Ward and Dispensary instruction, 6 hours, class sections. Prof. Winslow and 
assistants. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. — 1 hour. Prof. Timberlake. 

Orthopedic Surgery. — University Hospital, 1 hour. Prof. Taylor. 

Demonstrations at Hospital for Crippled Children, 1 hour. Prof. Taylor 
and Dr. Riely. 

State Medicine. — Lectures and Conference, 1 hour. Prof. Fulton. 

Obstetrics. — Clinical Conference, 1 hour. Prof. Neale. 

Attendance upon labor cases in and out of hospital. Ward classes, 4 hours 

History of Medicine. — 1 hour. Prof. Cordell. 

Diseases of the Throat and Nose. — Clinical Lectures, 1 hour. Prof. J. R. Winslow. 

Dispensary instruction, 6 hours, class sections. Drs. Johnston and Davis 

11 



Nervous and Mental Diseases. — Lectures, 1 hour. Clinics, 1 hour. Prof. 
Spear. Ward classes, 2 hours. Prof. Spear and Assistants. 
Dispensary Instruction, class sections, 5 hours. Prof. Spear andAssistants 
Weekly Clinics at Bayview Hospital during January, February and March. 
Prof. Spear. 

Special Clinics. — Diseases of the Skin, 1 hour. Prof. Gilchrist. 
Diseases of the Stomach, 1 hour. Prof. Hemmeter. 

At the end of the fourth year the student is admitted to the final 
examinations upon Medicine, Diseases of Children, Diseases of Eye 
and Ear, Surgery, Clinical Obstetrics, and the other special clinical 
courses, and upon passing successfully upon these branches will be 
admitted to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 



THE FOLLOWING WAS THE SCHEDULE FOR 1910-19 
FIRST YEAR. 



1 1. 



Hour 


Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday 


Friday 


Saturday 


9 




Osteology 


Chemical 
Laboratory 




Chemical 
Laboratory 


History of 
Medicine 


10 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Anatomy 


11 


Anatomy 
Physiology 


Histological 
Laboratory 


Anatomy 


Osteology 


Histological 
Laboratory 


Histological 


12 


Physiology 


Physiology 


Laboratory 


2 


Materia 
Medica 


Materia 
Medica 


Osteology 


Materia 
Medica 


Osteology 


Osteology 


2 
to 

5 


Chemical 

Laboratory 

2d half year 








Chemical 
Laboratory ^ 
2d half year 




3 

to 
5 30 


Dissecting 
1st half year 


Dissecting 
1st half year 


Dissecting 
1st half year 


Dissecting 
1st half year 


Dissecting 
1st half year 


Dissecting 
1st half year 



Hour 



10 



SECOND YEAR. 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Materia 

Medica and 

Pharmacology 

Laboratory 



Minor 
Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Hygiene 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



j Physiological 
Chemistry 
Laboratory 



1.30 
to 
3.30 

3.30 
to 
5.30 



Physiology 



7 Anatomy 



Pathology 
2nd half year 



Bacteriology 

Laboratory 

Dissecting 

2nd half year 



Bacteriology 
1st half year 



Physiological 
Laboratory 
Dissecting 

2d half year 



Materia 
Medica 



Minor 
Surgery 



Chemistry 



Minor 

Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 

Materia 
Medica 



Minor 

Surgery 



Physiology Physiology Anatomy 



Pathology 
2d half year 

Bacteriology 
Laboratory 
Dissecting 

2d half year 

12 



Bacteriology 
1st half year 



Pathology 
2d half year 

Bacteriology 
Laboratory 
Dissecting 
2d half year 



Physiological 

Laboratory 

Dissecting 

2d half year 



Saturday 



Physiological 

Chemistry 

Laboratory 

Pharmacology 
Laboratory 

2d half year 



Anatomy 



Dissecting 
2d half year 



THIRD YEAR. 



Hour 



Monday 



Tuesday 



Wednesday 



Thursday 



Friday 



Saturday 



9 


Surgery 


10 


Obstetrics 


11 


Medicine 


12 


Operative 
Surgery 



Surgery 



Therapeutics 



3-5 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Gynecology 



Operative 
Surgery 

Physical 
Diagnosis 



Operative 
Obstetrics 



Medical 
Clinic 



Surgery 



Surgical 
Clinic 



Operative 
Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Operative 
Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Therapeutics I 
Obstetrics 
Medicine 



Operative 
Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Neurology 



Clinical 
Laboratory 



Pathological 
Laboratory 



Clinical 
Laboratory 



Clinical 
Laboratory 



Pathological 
Laboratory 



Medical 
Clinic 



Ward Classes 

at Hospital 

for Crippled 

Children 



Operative 
Surgery 



Physical 
Diagnosis 



Bay View 

Hospital 

Physical 

Diagnosis 

2d half year 



FOURTH YEAR 


Hour Monday 


Tuesday 


Wednesday 


Thursday ! Friday 


Saturday 


9 Medicine 


Pediatrics 


Obstetrical 
Conference 


Me S d?cine MedlcIne 


State 
Medicine 


10 Ward 
1U Classes 


Ward 
Classes 


Ward 
Classes 


Surgical Ward 
Clinic Classes 


' Gynecological 
Operations 


12 Dispensary Dispensary 
Instruction Instruction 


Dispensary Dispensary ; Dispensary 
Instruction Instruction j Instruction 


Dispensary 
Instruction 


, Surgical Medical 
1 Clinic Clinic 


Children's 
Clinic 


Women's Stomach 
Clinic Clinic 


Genlto-Uri- 
nary Clinic 


2 Dispensary Dispensary 
Instruction Instruction 


Dispensary 
Instruction 


Dispensary 
Instruction 


Mental 
Diseases 


Dispensary 
Instruction 


1 

o Skin Neurology 
Clinic Clinic 


Orthopedic 
Clinic 


Throat and Eye and Ear 
Nose Clinic Clinic 


Clinic at 

Bay View 

Hospital 


4 Eye and Ear 
Diseases 


Surgery 


Neurology 


Surgery Surgery 


Clinic at 
Bay View Hos- 
pital 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 



Throughout the entire period of existence of the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland, clinical teaching has always been 
a prominent and important feature in the course of instruction. 

13 



The 'Ownership and exclusive control by the Faculty of Physic 
of the University Hospital and the Maternity Hospital of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and the clinical privileges enjoyed by the Univer- 
sity in the Presbyterian Eye, Ear and Throat Charity Hospital, 
the Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Children, Bayview Hospital, 
and other institutions for the sick in the city, place the Faculty in 
a position to make unusually prominent this important feature of 
a medical course, and have enabled it to organize and carry into effect 
a system of thorough clinical teaching whereby each member of the 
several class sections is brought into direct personal contact with 
the cases under examination. 

In addition to the regular daily clinical lectures in the amphi- 
theater, much attention is given to this strictly bedside instruction. 

The students, in small classes, are required to accompany the 
physician or surgeon through the wards of the hospital, and are there 
trained in making diagnosis, in the dressing of wounds, the applica- 
tion of splints, plaster jackets and other appliances, and in use of 
the ophthalmoscope and laryngoscope, and are enabled to observe 
the progress of cases under treatment. 

In the Dispensaries and Out-patient Departments, students have 
similar opportunities of familiarizing themselves with methods of 
diagnosis and treatment in the various specialties of medicine and 
surgery, and of observation of such cases as do not require confine- 
ment in bed. 

To the student of medicine the value of the training and encour- 
agement thus afforded him in habits of close and accurate observation, 
of self-possession and self-reliance, in the future practice of his profes- 
sion, can hardly be overestimated. 



HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accorc- 

14 



modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital however, more than kept pace with the increase 
in accommodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an en- 
tirely new and modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the 
former building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 
etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as the 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

for foreign seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a ship- 
ping point brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the 
world, and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the insti- 
tution give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 

CITY HOSPITAL. 

and contains charity beds supported by the city of Baltimore. This 
department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost capacity to afford 
accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 

15 



the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY OR OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

This department of the University Hospital furnishes a most 
abundant supply of material for clinical instruction. During the 
past year the number of visits made by patients to the various de- 
partments of the Dispensary was 28,244. 

The whole department is arranged and thoroughly organized to 
facilitate the classification of the patients coming under treatment 
and their distribution to the various professors giving clinical lectures. 

During the intervals between the sessions the regular clinics are 
continued in the amphitheater, and there is also, each day, a bedside 
clinic in the hospital and service in the Dispensary. It will thus be 
seen that the school offers unusual facilities for clinical study dur- 
ing its regular session, and that the continuance of the clinics during 
the year affords opportunity to such students and graduates as can 
spend their time in the city. 

Attention is called to the fact that during the intervals between 
the sessions, from June to October, students have the advantage of 
three hours of clinical instruction daily, between the hours of 11 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 

RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Accommodations are provided in dormitories adjacent to the hos- 
pital for resident students. To these are assigned wards in the 
hospital, with attendance upon the sick, under the daily supervision 
of the professors of the University and resident house officers. 
Special attention is called to the fact that in this institution under- 
graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of con- 
stant observation of the sick and of receiving daily bedside instruc- 
tion from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is 
the rule adopted, in order that the experience of the students may 
be as varied as possible. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 

16 



special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

Three resident physicians are annually appointed to this hospital 
from among the graduates of the University. 

For purposes of instruction in this most important branch, the 
members of the Senior Class, after a course of instruction by the 
Demonstrator of Obstetrics on the manikin, are taken in sections of 
two students each, into the wards of the hospital, where, under the 
direct and immediate supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and 
his Chief of Clinic, they are thoroughly instructed in vaginal exami- 
nation and the antiseptic precautions to be taken in making such 
examination, abdominal palpation, the diagnosis of presentations, 
and in the treatment of pregnant women preparatory to labor. 
The sections of the graduating class are assigned in rotation to at- 
tend labor cases in the hospital, and arrangements are perfected 
whereby members of the section are summoned without delay at 
any hour when labor occurs. 

Students are thus afforded opportunities under the immediate 
supervision of the instructor to become familiar with the mechanism 
of labor in all its stages, and have frequent opportunities to witness 
the application of forceps, and the methods of treatment of the 
various complications of labor. Much attention is also paid to their 
instruction in the subsequent treatment of mother and child. 

The out-door clinic is thoroughly organized, and after instruction 
in the hospital, students of the graduating class are allotted to attend 
labor cases at the homes of patients, under supervision of the 
Professor of Obstetrics, his Chief of Clinic, or either of the resident 
.physicians of the Lying-in Hospital, whenever complications or 
difficulties arise. 

During the past session an average number of forty cases of labor 
were seen by each student of the graduating class. 

By this system of combined didactic, practical, and clinical meth- 
ods of teaching, students of this University are afforded opportunities 
for instruction in this most important branch of medical science 
which are equaled by very few other schools and surpassed by none. 



17 



THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which was founded in 1877, largely through the 
efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the largest 
special hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1909, there were admitted to the Dispensary and 
Hospital 11,381 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

Professor Woods and his Demonstrators are at the Hospital, Tues- 
days, Thursdays, and Saturdays of each week and are prepared to 
demonstrate to students of the University the usual diseases of the 
eye and ear. Dr. Richard H. Johnston, of the Nose and Throat 
Department, at the University, is also a surgeon of the Presbyter an 
Hospital. The hospital is open at 2 p.m. each day. 

HOSPITAL FOR THE RELIEF OF CRIPPLED AND DEFORMED 

CHILDREN. 

This Orthopedic Hospital, with some fifty beds, is the only spe- 
cially equipped institution of the kind south of Philadelphia, and 
has the most modern apparatus and appliances for treating deformity, 
whether mechanical or operative means or both are used in correction. 
Prof. R. Tunstall Taylor is Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Under the direction of Prof. Taylor, sections of the graduating 
class will receive demonstrations at the bedside once a week in the 
diagnosis and treatment of deformity and also in the Dispensary. 

The Dispensary for general orthopedic cases of this hospital is 
open on Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays from 1 to 3 p.m. At 
all of these students will be afforded ample opportunity for the study 
of such cases. 

Professor Taylor gives a clinical and didactic lecture once a week 
at the University Hospital. 

BAY VIEW HOSPITAL. 4 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of this hospital of 2000 
beds, to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are 
daily visits and clinics by the teachers of the University in medicine 
and surgery at that institution, and the dead-house furnishes a great 
abundance and variety of pathological material, which is used 
for demonstration. The Insane Department contains 250 beds. 

18 



CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of the Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry, aided by the Demonstrators. Each stu- 
dent during his course has assigned him a table and is fully supplied 
with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of charge, except 
for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six hours 
weekly to work in this department. 

The course of instruction embraces : 1 . Training in the proper care 
and use of apparatus and in the manipulative processes used in the 
laboratory. 2. The experimental study of the more important 
elements and compounds, and the repetition of experiments per- 
formed in the course of lectures. 3. Instruction in the elements of 
qualitative analysis. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second-year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteids as well as a detailed course in the 
chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which may result in various dis- 
eases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 
The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, will be 
given the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF PRACTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped with the latest and most im- 
proved apparatus from the Harvard Scientific Apparatus Co., and 
Zimmermann of Leipzig. 

Each student is trained to become familiar with the phenomena 
of life by objective and personal study. 

An abundant supply of material is provided for experiment and 
demonstration. 

The laboratory is also well adapted for post-graduate study and 
special research in Physiology, for which opportunity will be given 
under suitable regulations. 

19 



LABORATORY OF NORMAL HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

Instruction in this department is given, for six hours weekly, 
and attendance is obligatory for all first-year students. The course 
of instruction embraces the method of using the microscope and 
its accessories; methods of hardening, cutting, staining and mounting 
the various tissues, together with frequent demonstrations of micro- 
scopical anatomy of the different organs and tissues of the body. 
The department is also well supplied with numerous mounted speci- 
mens for the instruction of students. 

LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGICAL HISTOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

In addition to the opportunities which are afforded students for 
the study of gross pathology by the weekly lectures and demonstra- 
tions, and by attendance upon the autopsies at University and Bay- 
view Hospitals, laboratory instruction is also given in Pathologi- 
cal Histology and Bacteriology, for which purposes the autopsies 
furnish an abundant supply of material. 

Ten hours weekly are devoted to this instruction, which is obliga- 
tory on all second- and third-year students. 

The course of instruction embraces the preparation and study of 
sections illustrating the common lesions of the various organs; the 
microscopic examination of urinary sediments; the various methods 
of isolating and identifying micro-organisms, and the method of 
staining important micro-organisms. 

Graduates and advanced students qualified to profit by su.ch work, 
desiring to undertake special lines of investigation in this depart- 
ment, will be afforded excellent opportunities for study. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY. 

The third-year class, divided into small sections, is given instruc- 
tions in examination of blood, urine, sputum, feces, and stomach 
contents, under the direction of Dr. Lockard. The Laboratory 
is thoroughly equipped. 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY. • 

The dissecting-room is in charge of the Demonstrator, who super- 
intends and directs the classes in their dissection. The rooms are 
convenient, well warmed, ventilated and lighted. The Demon- 
strator and his assistants pass much of their time in assisting the stu- 
dents and in guiding their labors. Access may be had to the rooms 
daily, between the hours of 3 and 6 p.m. 

20 



Dissecting tickets must- he countersigned by the Demonstrator 
as an evidence of satisfactory dissection. 

Dissecting material is furnished in abundance, free of charge. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The Library, founded in 1813, now contains 10,500 volumes, and 
is open daily during the year for the use of the members of the Fac- 
ulty, students and the profession generally. During the past year 
680 volumes were added. 

The more commodious quarters in the newly acquired Davidge Hall 
have promoted very much its growth and usefulness. 

It is well stocked with recent literature, and one hundred and 
forty-nine journals are regularly received. The pamphlets number 
7000. 

DENTAL INFIRMARY. 

The Dental Department of the University of Maryland is situated 
upon the University grounds, fronting on Greene Street, and adjoin- 
ing the building of the School of Medicine. 

Daily clinics are held in this department in the afternoon from 
2 to 5 o'clock, which are open to students of the School of Medicine, 
and offer excellent opportunities to students intending to practice 
in the country to familiarize themselves with dental operations. 

DEPARMENT OF PHARMACY. 

By arrangements recently concluded between the two institutions, 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, established in 1840, and widely 
and favorably known as one of the oldest and most prominent of 
the institutions of its kind in this country, has become the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, and now occupies 
buildings upon the University grounds. 

The lectures and laboratories in this Department will afford to 
students of the School of Medicine who expect to practice in the 
country, opportunities of acquiring a knowledge of correct methods 
of dispensing medicines which will be of much value in their future 
practice. 

Special courses of instructions in the laboratories of Pharmacy 
may be arranged for upon payment of a moderate fee. 

21 



ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

At the close of each session the following annual appointments 
are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent. 

Five Resident Surgeons. 

Four Resident Physicians. 

Two Resident Gynecologists 

One Resident Pathologist. 

One Dispensary Physician and Fifteen Chiefs of Clinic. 

TO THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL. 

Three Resident Physicians. 

A number of students are appointed eacn year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants. The fee for such hospital residence 
is one hundred and fifty dollars per year, payable in advance. This 
covers lodging, light and fuel. 

Several appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of the University of Maryland are 
eligible. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

In accordance with the rules of the Association of American Medi- 
cal Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, the 
requirements for Matriculation for all students beginning the study 
of medicine will be as follows: 

(A) A Bachelor's degree from an approved college or Univer- 
sity; or, 

(B) A Diploma from an accredited High School, Normal School 
or Academy, received after four years of study embracing not less 
than two years (4 points) of foreign language, of which one must be 
Latin, two years (4 points) of Mathematics, two years (4 points) of 
English, one year (2 points) of History, two years (4 points) of Lab- 
oratory Science, and six years (12 points) of further credit in Lan- 
guage, Literature, History or Science; or, 

22 






(C) An examination in the following branches, totaling 30 points: 

(a) Required, 16 points. Points 
Mathematics — 2' years 4 

Algebra and plane geometry. 
English — 2 years 4 

(a) English grammar. 

(b) Rhetoric and composition. 

Latin — 2 years 4 

(a) Latin grammar. 

(6) Latin prose composition. 

(c) Reading four books of Caesar or equivalent. 

Physics — 1 year, with laboratory work 2 

History — 1 year 2 

(b) Elective, 14 points. 

English Language and Literature — 2 years in addition to the required 4 points . . 4 
Language — Latin, German, French, Spanish or Greek, 4 years, not less than 

one year in any one 2 

History — 3 years, including civics and political economy 6 

Advanced Mathematics — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, £ year each. ... 2 
Natural Science — (1 year) Biology, 1 year, or Botany and Zoology, \ year each 2 

Physical Science — Chemistry or Physics, 1 year 2 

Earth Science — Physical Geography and Geology, \ year each 1 

Physiology and Hygiene — ^ year 1 

Astronomy — § year * 1 

Drawing — \ year 1 

One point, in any subject in a high school or academic course demands not 
less than five periods per week of forty-five minutes for eighteen weeks. 

Two points equal 5 counts, or 1 unit, or 2 credits. 

(D) Certificates of Principals of Accredited High Schools, Nor- 
mal Schools, Academies; of Superintendents of Public Schools; 
or Reputable Instructors recognized by Superintendents of Public 
Instruction of District, City or State; or of any State Board of 
Medical Examiners, will be accepted in lieu of any part of, or all of 
the above examination. 

A student may be allowed to enter on his medical work conditioned 
in not more than six points, and these conditions must be removed 
by satisfactory examination before he is allowed to enter on the 
second year of his medical course. 

After January 1, 1912, conditioned matriculation will no longer be 
permitted, and applicants for admission after that date must be free 
of all conditions upon matriculation. 

Applicants for matriculation desiring to avail themselves of the 
above provisions of exemption from matriculation examinations 
are advised, in order to save time, to bring with them a diploma, 
certificate or other evidence of their qualifications for exemption. 

23 



Examinations for Matriculation will be held by the Official Exam- 
iner, Dr. E. Deichmann, 714 North Howard Street, Baltimore, Md., 
at 9 a.m. upon the following Saturdays: 

August 5th September 2nd. October 7th. 
September 23rd. October 21st. 

All inquiries relating to Matriculation Examinations and qualifi- 
cations for exemption therefrom should be addressed to the Official 
Examiner, at the address given above. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the med- 
ical students' certificate from the State authorities before entering 
upon his medical studies. By adopting this course future difficul- 
ties may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, without 
being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, is by contract 
of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's College 
and who have made an approved choice of electives may if they desire 
it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical School of the 
University. If they successfully complete the work of the first med- 
ical year they are graduated with their class with the degree of A.B. 
from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work of 
the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and for 
four years he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seven years the M.D. degree, but credit from the Med- 
ical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit has already 
been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica, 

24 



1 



and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $100. 

STATUTES. • 

1. Cards for completed courses will be issued by the Dean at the 
end of the session. Laboratory tickets and tickets for practical an- 
atomy must be countersigned by the proper demonstrators and 
directors. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket will not be ac- 
cepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. Every candidate must have passed examinations in the vari- 
ous branches of medicine taught in this school, or show satisfactory 
evidence of having done so in other schools, and also produce evi- 
dence of satisfactory work in practical anatomy and the various labo- 
ratories. Attendance upon all clinical lectures is obligatory. 

3. Any student failing in more than one-half the yearly exami- 
nations shall be required to repeat the work of the year and shall not 
be allowed to advance with his class. Students deficient in less than 
one-half the year's work are permitted to make up their deficiency 
in the fall examinations. All students are required to stand the 
spring examinations unless excused by the Dean. No student wil] 
be permitted to enter the third-year class who has not completed all 
first-year work, and no student will be permitted to enter the fourth- 
year class who has not completed all second-year work. 

A student required to repeat the work of the first, second or 
third year will be permitted to do so upon payment of the matri- 
culation fee only. 

4. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
treasurer before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

5. Examinations for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are con- 
ducted by the several professors. 

A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end of 
the fourth year will be charged the regular fees for tuition, etc., 
and will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
should he again enter the school as a candidate for graduation. 

6. The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate 
is based upon the knowledge of his general attendance and industry, 
character and habits, as well as upon the results of his final examination. 

ANNUAL LIMITATION OF RULES AND FEES. 
All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1911, only. The right is reserved to make 

25 



changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees, and all 
the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid «ach year) $5.00 

Tuition fee (each year) 150.00 

Graduation fee 30.00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, or 
for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases for 
materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the entire 
amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tuition 
fee for that year will be $145. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this insti- 
tution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning Octo- 
ber 1, 1911. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first full 
course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual jourses, $25 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this Uni- 
versity, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, " to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year stu- 
dent only, who has successfully completed one year's work in the 
medical course, and no man may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

26 



These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physio 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of inability 
to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior or Sophomore Classes of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 
NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of students ' personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books 


$18 

' *96 
48 
35 
10 


$32 
5 

112 
65 
50 
20 


$50 


College Incidentals 


10 


Board, eight months 


128 




80 




100 




75 






Total 


$207 


$284 


$443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Superinten- 
dent of buildings, who may be found at his office on the premises, 
will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts of students. 

For further information, apply to 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 
27 



MATRICULATES FOR 1910-1911. 

POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Thomas G. Basn-.ght, M.D North Carokno 

John L. Brown, M.D Georgia 

George Constantine Ecuador 

R. W. Garnett, M.D Virginia 

Manuel Garrido Porto Rico 

Grover Bache Gill Virginia 

Morris Glucks Alabama 

Harrison Benjamin Kern Pennsylvania 

Charles Edgar Knell Maryland 

John Daniel Smyser New Jersty 

Chas. Cowan Taggart, M.D South Carolina 

Henry H. Weinberger, M.D New York 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Name State Preceptor 

Altvateb, Edward G Maryland Balto. Polytec. Inst. 

Asper, Burt Jacob.. Pennsylvania Drs. Asper and Wright. 

Athey, Henry Benedict Maryland Dr. C. N. Athey. 

Aviles, Angel Virgilio Ecuador Centra Univ. of Quito. 

Bacon, Walter Compton Maryland Geo. Washington Univ. 

Barefoot, Mordecai Lee, M.D North Carolina Dr. H. A. Royster. 

Beall, Louis G., M.D North Carolina N. C. Med. College. 

Berngartt, Bernard M Maryland 

Blair, Frederick L Rhode Island Coll. Phys. and Surgs. 

Boyer, Buehler Shoup Maryland 

Brown, Archie Eugene South Carolina Dr. Sheldon. 

Bulluck, Ernest Southerland North Carolina .Univ. of Va. 

Bterly, William L., A.B Maryland Dr. P. W. Byerly. 

Cassidy, Samuel H Tennessee Dr. H. H. Weinberger. 

Caughman, Belton Drafts, B.S South Carolina Univ. of Va. 

Causey, Henry Dickinson Delaware Dr. Chas. F. Davidson. 

Codington, Herbert Augustus, Ph.C Georgia Mercer Univ. 

Corson, Linneus H New Jersey Dr. C. M. Gray. 

Diehl, James Erwin Pennsylvania Dr. Jos. F. Diehl. 

Deixel, W. C Pennsylvania 

Dodson, Richard C Maryland Dr. C. V. Mace. 

Douglass, Louis Harriman Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Dovell, Early Beauregard Virginia Univ. Coll. of Med. 

Dries, Charles Luther Pennsylvania Jefferson Med. College. 

Durkin, William J New York 

Edelen, James Joseph Maryland Rock Hill College. 

Edlin, James S New York Dr. Emmanuel Baruch. 

Edwards, Jos. Benjamin South Carolina 

Eisenstein, Herman New York 

Fisher, Otto Virginia Dr. H. Hopewell. 

Glennan, Kenneth Rayner Maryland Geo. Washington Univ. 

Gracey, Charles Sumner, A.M Pennsylvania Jefferson Med. College. 

Greengrass, Jacob Jesse New Jersey 

Hirschman, Isidore Isaac Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Hobnstein, Abraham Lewis Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Howard, Grover Latham Virginia Univ. of Va. 

Howell, John Thomas, Ph.G North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Hus8EY, Raymond Garrison North Carolina Dr. J. S. Woodward. 

Igartua, Jose E Porto Rica Collegiate Prep. School. 

Jones. Kenneth B Maryland 

Joslin, Charles Loring Maryland Wilmington Con. Acad. 

Kahn, M. Randolph Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

28 



Name State Preceptor 

Keesob, Charles Hutchinson West Virginia New Concord High School. 

Kernodle, Charles Edward North Carolina Dr. J. L. Kernodle. 

Langlois, Charles Joseph Massachusetts Dr. J. A. Langlols. 

Law, Charles R., Jr Maryland 

Lee, Samuel E Maryland Dr. F. E. Rathbun. 

Levinson, Frank Maryland Dr. J. H. Mltnick. 

Linn, Willis New York Df. F. H. Willis. 

McCain, Paul Pbesslt, A.B South Carolina Dr. J. W. Wideman. 

McDaniel, Lawrence E., B.S South Carolina Dr. H. E. McDaniel. 

McLmAN, Frank Maryland Dr. Isaac N. King. 

Macks, Isaac M Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Mallen, Manuel Eulalio San Domingo Dr. Rafael Janer. 

Mabett, William Clinton South Carolina Dr. W. J. Carter. 

Massenbubg, George Y., Phar. D Maryland Dr. R. C. Massenburg. 

Messildine, John G Kansas 

Moulton, Allen T Massachusetts Dr. Frank Washburn. 

Mulstein, Adolph New York 

Niblett, Walteb Saulsbuby Delaware Dr. V. O. James. 

Nichols, Elijah E Delaware 

Nobton, John Chables Maryland Dr. Martin A. O'Neill. 

Oleb, Vebnon Llewellyn Maryland Dr. E. Millard Reld. 

Ostbo, John Delaware Dr. M. Ostro. 

Quigi.ey, James Eable Pennsylvania Dr. J. Clinton Atwell. 

Ramibez, Themistocles, S.B Porto Rico 

Roach, James Edwabd Maryland Dr. L. H. Gundry. 

Rynkiewicz, Stanley H Pennsylvania 

Schaeffeb, Habby Bagenstose Pennsylvania Jefferson Med. College. 

Schmidt, Chables Louts Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Speas, Dallas C North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Stinson, Louis Mississippi Dr. W. B. Dicks. 

Stomel, Joseph Pennsylvania 

Tanktn, Habby J New York 

Taylob, Emmett O'Bbien South Carolina Med. Coll. of S. C. 

Taylob, Ralph Leland, A.B Georgia Univ. of Ga. 

Thomas, Claude A., Ph.G Oklahoma Dr. W. N. Thomas. 

Thomas, Joseph Enloe South Carolina 

Townshend, Gbafton Dent Maryland Randolph-Macon Acad. 

Vbeeland, Ralph James New Jersey 

Walker, Louis Kyle North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Wallace, Chables S., M.D Oklahoma Dr. S. F. Scott. 

WALLEN8TEIN, Sydney New York 

Watebs, Chables A Maryland Dr. T. J. Talbott. 

Webbteb, Albert G Maryland Dr. T. B. Marden. 

West, Earl Clifton Delaware 

Whims, Thomas Gay North Carolina Dr. R. P. Morehead. 

Wilkins, Java Cleveland, Ph. B North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Williams, Richard Lloyd Pennsylvania Jefferson Med. College. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Abell, Robebt E South Carolina Davidson College. 

Allgood, Reese Alexander South Carolina Dr. J. L. Valley. 

Allison, Robebt Glenn South Carolina Dr. J. S. Barron. 

Anstine, Hammond N Maryland Dr. J. W. Heaps. 

Battle, Geobge Cullen North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Beabd, Gboveb C North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Bishop, Habby A Dist. of Columbia.. .Baltimore Med. College. 

Bonneb, Robebt A Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Buchanan, Sidney E North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Cannon, William Fbanklin, Jr North Carolina Univ. of N. C 

Ohipman, W. Thomas Delaware Dr. W. H. Chlpman. 

29 



Name State Preceptor. 

Clautice, Charles P Maryland 

Claytoh, W. Rivers South Carolina Dr. H. Claytor. 

Cochb4N, James D North Carolina 

Connors, Thomas Joseph Connecticut Dr. C. W. Fuller. 

Darby. John Dade Maryland Md. Agrlc. College. 

Dean, Russell, H., Jr Florida Dr. R. H. Dean. 

Deibel, Harry Maryland Dr. Harry Gross. 

Disbrow, George Ward New Jersey 

Di Stefano, Dominick Maryland Dr. E. G.Welch. 

Donovan, John Bernard Maine Dr. J. A. Donovan. 

Duogan, James Archie Georgia 

Fajardo, Idalberto Cuba Dr. J. M. Infante. 

Frey, Ernest William Maryland 

Friedheim, Samuel, Jr South Carolina Med. College of S. C. 

Gallion, William E., jr Maryland Dr. Curran. 

George, Dawson Orme Maryland Dr. Enoch George. 

Goldstein, Abraham New York 

Grace, Benjamin L Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Haines, William Granville Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Hair, Judson Elam, Jr South Carolina 

Hand, Jesse Donald New York 

Hennessey, Edward H. J Connecticut Dr. Wm. H. Conklin. 

Hinnant, Milford North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Hubbard, James Edward Maryland St. John's College. 

Irwin, Henderson, B.S North Carolina Univ. of Va. 

Johnson, Edward Sooy Maryland Dr. J. A. Riley. 

Johnston, John Kent Florida 

Judd, Clarence W .Pennsylvania Dr. A. P. Gray 

Kish, Paul New Jersey Dr. McChesney . 

Kolb, Edwin P Maryland New Windsor College. 

Lawler, Daniel H Connecticut Dr. J. A. Coogan. 

Lebret, Gerard Henry New Jersey Dr. A. E. Wrensch, Jr. 

Lenzner, Simon Geilech New York 

Lichtenberg, Moses Louis Maryland Baltimore City College. 

LiLLiCH, Bertrand Alley, Phar.D Pennsylvania 

Livingston, Everett A North Carolina 

Llamas, Enrique Colombia, S. A 

Long, Miles T North Carolina 

Looper, Edward Anderson Georgia Dr. W. S. Elkln. 

McGoogan, Benjamin J North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Martin, Andres G Cuba Collegiate Prep. School. 

Meeks, Charles G Maryland 

Michel, William Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Miller, J. Robert South Carolina Dr. D. J. Brinner. 

Murray, James Henry, Jr Maryland Dr. Cawood. 

Newhouse, Benjamin Maryland 

O'Donnell, Hugh James Pennsylvania 

Parlett, Roger V Maryland St. John's College. 

Patrick, R. Bruce, A.B South Carolina Erskloe College. 

Pearlstein, Phillip Texas 

Phillips, John Cleveland Georgia 

Rauschenbach, Charles William, Phar. D Maryland Md. Coll. of Phar. 

Rich, Herman Harry New Jersey Dr. W. Winters. 

Roose, Samuel A Pennsylvania 

Rottenberg, Joseph Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Scott, Wilbur Moate Georgia Dr. W. S. Elkin. 

Sharp, Jay D., B.S Indiana Valparaiso College. 

Sherrill, Everett Alanson, B.S North Carolina 

Silberman, David Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Skladowsky, John A Maryland Baltimore City College. 

30 



i 



Name 



State 



Preceptor 



Smith, D. Antononovic New Zealand 

Spoors, Compton New York 

Stansbury, John C Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Stem, Gbover A Maryland Dr. Edwin D. Cronk. 

Stevens, Thomas F. A., Phar. D Maryland Md. Coll. of Phar. 

Stilley, Jesse Cunningham Pennsylvania Dr. W. J. Bryson. 

Straebsley, Edward Charles Pennsylvania Dr. F. X. Straessley. 

Traband, John Henry, Jr Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Vega, Ltjis G., A.B Cuba Instituto de Oriente. 

Vinciguerra, Michael New Jersey Dr. A. Bianchl. 

Webb, Harold Hamer Virginia 

Webster, John Edgar Maryland 

Wells, Grady Brice South Carolina Dr. H. R. Wells. 

Whitaker, Edwin Vignes Louisiana Univ. of Louisville. 

Wiener, Hyman R Pennsylvania Dr. J. E. Gichner. 

Windham, Roy A Michigan 

Yeager, W. Howard Pennsylvania Dr. J. H. Vastine. 

Zimmerman, Henry Massachusetts Hartford High School. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Bean, Philip Jenifer Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Boylan, Lawrence B New Jersey 

Breeding, Earle Griffith, A.B Maryland Washington College. 

Brinson, John Bradford, Jb Florida Dr. Taliaferro. 

Buch, J. M. t A.B Cuba Instituto de Oriente. 

Butler, Humphrey Maryland Dr. Geo. Butler. 

Callahan, Frank F Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Casler, Frank G West Virginia West Va. Univ. 

Cavanaugh, Leo M Maryland Dr. A. Leo Franklin. 

Councill, Wilford A. Hall Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Craven, Franklin Clyde North Carolina 

Detrick, Frederick Louis Virginia Dr. Wm. Dabney. 

Divine, Frederick Raymond Rhode Island Dr. Edw. Gill. 

Ebert, John William Virginia Dt. S. P. Latane. 

Edwards, Charles Reid Maryland Frederick City High School. 

Edwards, Vertie Edward North Carolina Dr. C. N. Keeler. 

Gannon, Charles Henry Rhode Island 

Gavla3, Frank E Pennsylvania 

Goldsmith, Harry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Gould, Nathaniel Virginia Norfolk High School. 

Grant, Harry Clifford North Carolina 

Hays, Leonard Maryland Dr. E. 0. White. 

Hayworth, Claudius Abljah North Carolina N. C. Med. College. 

Holmes, Everett J Maine 

Holstein, Aaron Louis New Jersey 

Hundley, Frank G Maryland Dr. E. G. Comegys. 

Lecates, Howard E Maryland Laurel High School. 

Levin, Herman Harry Connecticut Tufts College. 

Lynch, George Boyce North Carolina.. . . 

Magruder, Charles L Maryland Dr. B. 0. Thomas. 

Murphy, Franklin Dashiell. Maryland 

Nance, Fuller, Ph.G Maryland 

Neal, Horace M North Carolina Dr. J. W. Neal. 

Neistadt, Simon Maryland Baltlmore^City College. 

Newcomer, Elmer Maryland 

NrrscHE, Norbebt Charles, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Joseph's College. 

Norment, Richard Baxter, Jr Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Ostendo Rf, Walte R A Maryland 

Perez Hernan Marino, Lit. B Cuba Instituto de Oriente. 

Pratt, T. Ruffin North Carolina Dr. Thos. Taylor. 



31 



Name State Preceptor 

Raysor, Habbt C South Carolina Wofford College. 

Reynolds. James Edward New Hampshire 

Scrucgs, Wm. Henry, Jr Georgia Mercer Univ. 

Shriner, Francis Earle Maryland 

Shuler, G. Clyde Virginia 

Sirak, William W Pennsylvania 

Slusher, Hamilton J Virginia 

Sparck, Joseph Maryland Milton Academy. 

Stoneham, H. G Virginia 

Toulson, W. Houston, A.B Maryland Washington College. 

Travers, Edgar Eugene Maryland Va. Mil. Inst. 

Troxler, Moody R North Carolina 

Warner, Theodore B Maryland 

Whitten, B. Otis South Carolina Dr. W. J. Carter. 

Wrightson, William O South Carolina 

Young, Charles Henry, D.D.S Sou h Carolina 

Young, Mason Pressly, B.S South Carolina Erskine College. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Ash, Robert H., Jr New York Dr. R. H. Ash. 

Avakian, Vosgan A., B, A Turkey Euphrates College. 

Ayres, Charles C Maryland Jarrettsvllle High School. 

Balart-Cros, Antonio Cuba Charlotte Hall Academy. 

Barber, Yates Middleton Virginia William and Mary College. 

Barnard, James G Maryland Dr. O. H. Bruce. 

Barr, Walter Stuart South Carolina Davidson College. 

Block, David Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Bogart, Clark S Pennsylvania Bradford High School. 

Bradley Theron Robert New York Dr. A. D. Wadsworth 

Bridges, Harvey C North Carolina Dr. A. S. Bridges. 

Bp.ogden, James Chester, A.B South Carolina Wofford College. 

Brotman, Meyer New Jersey Newark High School. 

Burchinal, Arthur P Pennsylvania Dr. C. C. Sheely. 

Byers, Horace Wellington North Carolina Hampden-Sidney College. 

Clark, Haynsworth. D Florida Alachua High School. 

Clabk, Hugh E Virginia Winchester High School. 

Clinton, Roland Smith North Carolina Dr. H. M. Eddleman. 

Coleman, Alexander Stuart Georgia Dr. Albert Jefferson. 

Collinson, Joseph Franklin Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Cook, Le Compte Maryland St. John's College. 

Crist, George Bruce Maryland Frederick High School. 

Davis. Theodore McCann South Carolina Dr. R. E. Houston. 

Denny, Walter L., Jr Maryland Dr. Harry Gross. 

Dobson, James Furman South Carolina Furman University. 

Dovell, Chauncey Elmo Virginia Prof. E. R. Rogers. 

Echeverria, Jose R Florida Tampa High School. 

Eisenburg, Isidore Maryland Dr. M. Myerson. 

Esslinger, Richard I., Phar. D Maryland Baltimore City College 

Fenby, John Smith Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Foxwell, Raymond Kennedy Maryland Charlotte Hall Academy. 

Fuentes, Manuel Riera, A.B Cuba Instituto de Oriente. 

Gonzalez, Luis Porto Rico Dr. S. B. Jones. 

Guistwhite, Bruce H Pennsylvania Lykens High School. 

Habuston, Charles Carroll, Phar. D Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Hassell, Cecil S North Carolina Dr. S. Hassell. 

Hays, Mathew Ewing West Virginia Dr. C. N. Wiant. 

Hick3, Claud B., A.B .' . . . North Carolina Trinity College. 

Hoke, Clarence C, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Mary's College. 

Horger, Eugene Leroy, A.B South Carolina Wofford College. 

Johnson, Raymond Lovejoy, Ph.G Florida Dr. A. B. Beill. 

Jones, Milton De Ralph Maryland Baltimore City College. 

32 



A 



Xams State Preceptor 

Katzenberger, James Wesley, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Joseph's College. 

Kean, Thomas Andrew, Jr Maryland LaSalle Institute. 

Koether, Emil J. H Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Levin, Morris Benjamin Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Limbaugh, Louie M Florida Duval High School. 

Lipnick, Alexander Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Lutz, John Francis, A.B Maryland St. John's College. 

Markell, Solomon Charles Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Meech, Samuel Wilson Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Metcalfe, Challice Hagdon Virginia Washington College. 

Mitchener, James Samuel. B.S North Carolina Davidson College. 

Morales, Jose, Ph.G., A.B Florida Univ. of Habana. 

Mordecai, Alfred North Carolina Dr. C. J. Parker. 

Morton, Richard Woods North Carolina Dr. W. F. Long. 

08TRO, Marcus Delaware Collegiate Prep. School. 

arlett, William Alvino Maryland Dr. John T. Avery. 

Perkins, Edwin H Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Portuondo, Albert Leocadis...: Cuba Villanova College. 

Pooshkin, Benjamin Maryland Witebsk Gymnasium. 

Pujadas, Manuel Porto Rico Univ. of Porto Rico. 

Reed, Joseph Carrington Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Rice, George W Maryland Cumberland High School. 

Rice, William Frederick Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Richards, Walter L Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Schapiro, Abraham Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Schmuck, Harry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Shalowitz, Hyman Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Smith, M. Duke Maryland Denton High School. 

Stahl, William Martin Connecticut Collegiate Prep. School. 

Stein, Harry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Stephens, Charles M Pennsylvania Delta High School. 

Stewart, Emmet J Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Tim anus, George Loutrell Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Tolleson, Clarence South Carolina Wofford College. 

Vaccaro, Leopold Saverio Maryland Clark University. 

Van Poole, Carl North Carolina Mt. Pleasant Coll. Inst. 

Vinson, Porter Paisley, B.S., A.M North Carolina Davidson College. 

Walsh, William S Rhode Island LaSalle Academy. 

Warner, Howard Hoge Maryland Friends School. 

Weaver, Sylvanus Robert Maryland 

Whiteside, W. Carl South Carolina Hickory Grove High School. 

Whittington, William Eugene North Carolina Baltimore Med. College. 

Williams, David T Virginia Collegiate Prep. School. 

Williams, John L South Carolina Dr. E. Deichmann. 

Wilson, Frank Minium Maryland Dr. J. Jones Wilson. 

Wilson, Frank W North Carolina Dr. C. O. LaughiDghouse. 

Wolfe Humphrey A. G Maryland Milton Academy. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1910-1911; 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 225 

School of Medicine 330 

Department of Law 177 

Dental Department 203 

Department of Pharmacy 100 

Training School for Nurses 76 

Total 1177 

33 



GRADUATES JUNE 1, 1911 



Edward Garbett Altvater Maryland. 

Burt Jacob Asper Pennsylvania. 

Henry Benedict Athet Maryland. 

Walter Comptom Bacon Maryland. 

Mordecai Lee Barefoot North Carolina. 

Frederick Lewis Blair Rhode Island. 

Btjehler Shoup Boyer Maryland. 

Archie Eugene Brown South Carolina. 

Ernest S. Bullack North Carolina. 

William Luther Byerly Maryland. 

Samuel Hopkins Cabsidy Tennessee. 

Belton Drafts Caughman South Carolina. 

Henry Dickinson Causey Delaware. 

Herbert Augustus Codington Georgia. 

James Erwin Diehl Pennsylvania. 

Richard C. Dodson Maryland. 

Louis Harriman Douglass Maryland. 

Charles L. Dries Pennsylvania. 

William Joseph Durkin New York. 

James Joseph Edelen Maryland. 

Joseph Benjamin Edwards S. Carolina. 

Otto Fisher Virginia. 

Jacob Jesse Greengrass New Jersey. 

Isidore Isaac Hirschman Maryland. 

Abraham Lewis Hornstein Maryland. 

Grover Latham Howard Virginia. 

John Thomas Howell North Carolina. 

Raymond Garrison Hus9ey..jW*A Carolina. 

Jose E. Igartua de Jesus Porto Rico. 

Kenneth B. Jones Maryland. 

Charles Hutchison Keesor W. Virginia. 

Charles Edward Kernodle N. Carolina. 

Charles R. Law, Jr Maryland. 

Samuel Engle Lee Maryland. 

Frank Lbvinson Maryland. 



Willis Linn New York. 

Paul Pressly McCain South Carolina. 

Lawrench E. McD aniel South Carolina. 

Isaac Michel Macks Maryland. 

Manuel Eulalio Mallen Santo Domingo. 

William Clinton Marett South Carolina. 

George Yellott Massenbubg Maryland. 

John Guirley Missildinb Pennsylvania. 

Allen T. Moulton Massachusetts. 

Adolph Mulstbin New York. 

Walter Saulsbury Niblett Delaware. 

Elijah Emera Nichols Delaware. 

Vernon Llewellyn Oler Maryland. 

John Ostro Delaware. 

James Earle Quigley Pennsylvania. 

Themistocles Julian Ramirez Porto Rico. 

Stanley H. Rnykiewicz Pennsylvania. 

Harry Bagenstose Schaeffer. .Pennsylvania. 

Charles Louis Schmidt Maryland. 

Dallas C. Speas North Carolina. 

Louis Stinson Mississippi. 

Joseph Stombl Pennsylvania. 

Emmett O'Brien Taylor . . . South Carolina. 

Ralph Leland Taylor Georgia. 

Joseph Enloe Thomas South Carolina. 

Grafton Dent Townshend Maryland. 

Ralph J. Vreeland New Jersey. 

Louis Kyle Walker North Carolina. 

Charles Stuart Wallace Oklahoma. 

Sydney Wallenstein New York. 

Charles Alexander W t aters Maryland 

Albert G. Webster Maryland. 

Thomas Gay Whims West Virginia. 

Java Cleveland Wilkins North Carolina. 

Richard Lloyd Williams Pennsylvania. 



PRIZEMEN. 

University Prize— Gold Medal Burt Jacob Asper 

Certificates of Honor. 

Charles Louis Schmidt, Jose E. Igartua, 

Joseph Benjamin Edwabds, Thomas Gat Whims, 

Themistocles Julian Ramirez, Isaac Michel Macks, 

Charlm Hutchison Keesor. 



S4 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 



Wm. J. Coleman, M.D. 
Medical Superintendent. 



Joseph W. Hooper, M.D. 
Fred W. Rankin, M.D. 
Wm. A. Gracie, M.D. 
N. B. Steward, M.D. 
C. N. Devilbiss, M.D. 
A. C. McCall, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons. 



J. M. Blodgett, M.D. 
G. C. Coulbourn, M.D. 
R. C. Dodson, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physicians. 



H. B. Gantt, M.D. 
F. R. Winslow, M.D. ' 

Assistant Resident Gynecologist} 
L. K. Walker, M.D. 
Resident Pathologist. 

FACULTY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Physicians. 
Prop. C. W. Mitchell, M.D.° Prop. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

Prop. J. C. Hemmeter, M.D. Prop. C. W. McElpresh, M.D 

Prop. J. E. Gichner, M.D.° Prop. Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Prop. Harry Adler, M.D. Prop. I. J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Surgeons. 
Prop. R. Winslow, M.D. Prop. Hiram Woods, M.D. 

Prop. T. A. Ashby, M.D. Prop. Frank Martin, M.D. 

Prop. J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Prop. St. Clair Spruill, M.D. 

Prop. J. M. Hundley, M.D. Prop. John R. Winslow, M.D. 

CLINICAL ASSISTANTS FOR 1911-1912. 



R. E. Abell, South Carolina. 

R. A. Allgood, South Carolina. 

R. G. Allison, South Carolina. 

G. C. Battle, North Carolina. 

H. A. Bishop, District of Columbia. 

R. A. Bonner, Jr., Maryland. 

S. E. Buchanan, North Carolina. 

W. T. Chipman, Delaware. 

W. R. Claytor, South Carolina. 

J. D. Darby, Maryland. 

R. H. Dean, Jr., Florida. 

H. Deibel, Maryland. 

J. A. Duggan, Georgia. 

I. Fajardo, Cuba. 

W. E. Gallion, Jr., Maryland. 

D. O. George, Maryland. 

J. E. Hair, Jr., South Carolina. 

H. Irwin, North Carolina. 

The total number of patients treated in the Hospital during the year 
1910-1911 was 5028. 

35 



E. S. Johnson, Maryland. 
J. K. Johnston, Florida. 
G. H. Lebret, New Jersey. 
M. L. Lichtenberg, Maryland. 
A. G. Martin, Cuba. 
W. Michel, Maryland. 
Benj. Newhouse, Maryland. 
R. B. Patrick, South Carolina. 

C. W. Rauschenbach, Maryland. 
W. M. Scott, Georgia. 

J. D. Sharp, Indiana. 

D. Silberman, Maryland. 
G. A. Stem, Maryland. 

J. H. Traband, Maryland. 
L. G. Vega, Cuba. 
M. Vinciguerra, New Jersey. 
H. R. Wiener, Pennsylvania. 



THE UNIVERSITY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 
Under the guidance of the Superintendent, the pupils of this School are in- 
structed in all that pertains to Scientific Nursing. Lectures are also delivered to 
them by the members of the Faculty of Physic, on Elementary Anatomy, Physi- 
ology, Materia Medica, Chemistry, Antiseptics and Hygiene, as well as upon Nurs- 
ing in special practice. The Nursing in the Hospital is thus conducted on the 
most approved plan, and its large material is invaluable to the pupils of the School. 
For circulars and information about the Training School, address, 
Mrs. Ethel P. Clarke, Superintendent of Nurses, 

Hospital of the University of Maryland, 
Baltimore, Md. 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
Prof. L. E. Neale, M. D., Director. 
E. H. Kloman, M.D., Associate 

Wm. L. Byerly, M.D. L. H. Douglass, M.D. S. E. Lee, M.D. 

Resident Physicians. 

Synopsis of the Report of the Resident Physicians for the Year Ending May, i, 

1911 

Number of Confinements in Hospital 400 

Number of Confinements in Out-door Department 1060 

Total 1460 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class, 40 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Anatomy. — Piersol. 

Surgery. — Da Costa; Wyeth; Brewer; Lexer-Bevan; Binnie's; Opera- 
tive Surgery; Park. 

Chemistry. — Remsen; Witthaus; Holland; Simon. 

Obstetrics. — William's Obstetrics; Hirst, American Text-Book of Obstetrics. 
Principle and Practice of Medicine. — Anders; Osier; Edwards. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Culbreth's Materia Medica; Wood's 
Therapeutics; (1 vol.); Cushny; Hare. 

Physiology. — Halliburton; Hall; Howell; Brubaker; Tigers^edt. 

Diseases of Women. — Ashby; Ashton; Montgomery; Penrose. 

Diseases oi the Eye. — Fuchs. 1908 Edition; DeSchweinitz; May. 

Diseases of the Ear. — Politzer (last edition) Deuch; Bezold. 

Diseases of the Throat and Nose. — Elementary, J J. Kyle; Gleason;. 
Advanced. — Ballenger; B. Kyle; Coakley; Grunewald's Atlas. 

Orthopedic Surgery. — Taylor's Notes on Orthopedic Surgery. 

Pathology. — Delafield and Prudden; Stengel; Macfarland; Abbott's Bacte- 
riology; Histology — Ferguson. Embryology — McMurrich; Heisler. 

Medical Jurisprudence. — Chapman; Draper; Stewart. 

Hygiene. — Egbert; Harrington; Parke; Bergey. 

Diseases of Nervous System. — Starr; Church and Peterson; Gowers; Dana. 

Mental Diseases. — Kraepelin; Defendorf. 

Diseases of Children. — Holt. 

Disease of Skin. — Stelwagen: Duhring; Hyde. 

Medical Dictionary. — Dunglison (last edition); Duane; Gould (third edition); 
Dorland. 36 



Works on Special Subjects. — Greene's Medical Diagnosis; Cabot's Phy- 
sical Diagnosis; Hemmeter, Diseases of the Stomach; Da Costa on Diagno- 
sis; Sahli's Diagnosis; Anders and Barton's Diagnosis; Musser's Medical 
Diagnosis; Von Jacksch, Clinical Diagnosis; Tyson, Practical Examination 
of Urine; Ogden, Clinical Examination of Urine; Fractures, Scudder; Diseases 
of the Rectum, Gant; Park's History of Medicine. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 
The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 
The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an orator 
will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old class- 
mates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates who 
have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 
The following are the officers for the current year: 
President — Charles E. Sadtler, M.D. 
First Vice-President — Geo. H. Steuart, M.D. 
Second Vice-President — Marshall West, M.D. 
Third Vice-President — Samuel T. Earle, M.D. 
Recording Secretary — Nathan Winslow, M.D. 
Asst. Recording Secretary — Wm. S. Love, M.D. 
Corresponding Secretary — John I. Pennington, M.D. 
Treasurer — John Houff, M.D. 

Executive Committee — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D., B. Merrill Hopkin- 
son, M.D., C. R. Winterson, M.D., G. A. Fleming, M.D.,V. L. Norwood, 
M.D. 
Application for membership should be accompanied with Initiation Fee of $1.00 
and mailed to the Corresponding Secretary or Treasurer. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
C. H. Young, President. 

This Association since its establishment, sixteen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

The Association now occupies comfortable rooms in one of the buildings of the 
University. 

Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout the 
College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character and 
morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session to wel- 
come new students to the University, and will also be glad to render assistance in 

37 



the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding houses, etc., and to extend any 
other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges of the Association, and to address the officer named below, 
who will be glad to furnish any information desired regarding the Association 
and its work, and to render any assistance in his power, and upon arriving in 
the city are requested to make themselves known as soon as possible. 

C. H. Young, President. 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 

ENDOWMENT. 

Through the instrumentality of the Alumni Association, an important move- 
ment in the direction of securing a permanent endowment for the School of Medi- 
cine of the University has lately been inaugurated. 

The following gentlemen constitute the present Board of Trustees of this fund : 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. 
Samuel C. Chew, M.D.. LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G 

Harry Adler, M.D. B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Eugene F. Cordell, M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

J. Harry Tregoe, Esq. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its legal title 
being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland," 
and is independent and self-perpetuating, filling its own vacancies. Its powers 
are limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from the fund, which is to 
be applied in the discretion of the Board for the Benefit of the School. 

Attention is invited to the "Charles Frick Research Fund", lately established 
by Messrs. Reverdy Johnson and Wm. F. Frick, for original research. 

Contributions, bequests or donations to this fund are solicited from the Alumni 
and friends of the school. These contributions may be made to the general fund, 
or for some special object, as building, research, library, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. 

Checks should be made payable to J. Harry Tregoe, Treasurer, 300 N. Charles 
Street, Baltimore. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 
I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the bene- 
fit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 
To Endowment Fund. 
I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State 

of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

38 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 

FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

B. Vernon Cecil, M.A., Sc.D., Vice-President, (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of 

Chemistry and Physics. 
John B. White, M.A., (Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A., (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor 

of Mathematics. 

C. W. Strtker, M.A., (Graduate of Union College, New York), Professor of History and Political 

Economy. 
John Brockway Ripperb, B.A., (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Professor of Latin. 
Bartgis McGlone, Ph.D., (Graduate of Johns Hopkins University), Professor of Biology. 
Edward Hinman Sirich, B.A., (Graduate of Johns Hopkins University), Professor of French and 

German. • 

Ronald E. Fisher, 14th Cavalry, U. S. A., (Lieutenant of the United States Army), Professor of 

Military Science and Tactics, and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 
Edwin Stanley Armstrong, M.A., (Graduate of University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Eng- 
lish. 
Charles G. Eidson, B.S., E.E., (Graduate of University of Tennessee), Professor of Mechadcal 

Engineering. 
A. W. Woodcock, Jr., M.A., (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Thomas L. Gladden, Superintendent of the Preparatory School, and Instructor in English and Latin. 
Roscoe E. Grove, B.A., (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant in Preparatory School, and 

Instructor in Gymnastics. 

For information and Annual Catalogue, address The President of St. John's College, Annapolis, 
Md. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The regular Winter Session begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the following 
May. 
The requirements for admission are the same as in all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Principles of Dental Science, Oral Sur- 
gery and Dental Prosthesis. 
R. Dorsey Coalb, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
Randolph Winblow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Clinical Professor of Oral Surgery. 
J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 
B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D., D.D.S. Professor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 
John C. Uhler, M.D., D.D.S., Associate Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
J. S. Geiser, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative and Prosthetic Technics. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry and Porcelain Inlay Work 
Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Anaesthesia. 
J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor oand Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

AND FIFTEEN ASSISTANT DENTAL DEMONSTRATORS. 

Matriculation and Tuition Fees, per Session, $150.00. 
For information and annual catalogue, address T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, Baltimore, 
Md. 

39 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

FORTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Judge Henry D. Harlan, Constitutional Law and Domestic Relations. 
Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations, Pleading, Practice and Legal Ethics. 
Judge Henry Stockbridge, International Law, Public and Private; Conflict of Laws, Executors and 

Administrators. 
Edgar A. Poe, Esq., Bills and Notes, Sales, Suretyship, Personal Property and Bailments. 
W. Calvin Chestnut, Esq., Criminal Law and Insurance. 
Judoe James P. Gorter, Juridical Equity, Evidence and Damages. 
Judge John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courte, Admiralty, Bankruptcy, 

Patents, Trade-marks, Copyrights and Unfair Competition. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., The Law of Real Property. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Title to Real Property, Conveyancing and Dliector of the Moot Court. 
Albert C. Ritchie, Esq., Commercial Law, Shipping and Elementary Law. 
William L. Marbury, Esq., The Law of Torts. 
Charles J. Bonaparte, Esq., The Law of Contracts. 
Judge Carroll T. Bond, Executors and Administrators. 
Samuel Want, Esq., Director of Library and Students' Adviser. 

For catalogue containing full Information, Address, 
Henry D. Harlan. Dean of Law Faculty 

1061 Calvert Building, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

SIXTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

FACULTY. 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M.R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 



ADJUNCT FACULTY. 

H. A. B. Dunning, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Jab. W. Westcott, Ph.G.. Associate Professor of Materia Medlca and Pharmacognosy. 

Chas. H. Ware, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Botany. 

Chas. C.Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Vegetable Histology. 

Henry E. Wich, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Dispensing. 

Joel J. Barnett, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Pharmacy. 

For Catalogue containing full information, address Charles Caspari, Jr., Dean of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



40 




mi. , , lift ■ - >- • — i-; . -. JauL.— ^^i iJ-. 



University of Maryland 



ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH 
ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF THE 

School of Medicine 



N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SESSION 1912- 1913 



BALTIMORE 
WILLIAMS A WILKINS COMPANY 

1912 



CALENDAR, 



One Hundred and Sixth Annual Session. 

1912. 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University Hospital. 
October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

October 14. — Re-examination of Deficient Students and Examina- 
tion for Advanced Standing. 
November 28. — Thanksgiving Day, Holiday. 
December 23. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 



CHRISTMAS RECESS. 
1913. 

January 3. — Lectures resumed. 9 a.m. 
February 22. — Holiday. 
May 15. — Final Examinations begin. 

June 1 (about). — Commencement, Annual Meeting of Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 



THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor, or Master of Arts or Sciences. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. This school 
was established in Baltimore, Md., in 1807, and offers a high-grade 
course in medicine,, extending over a period of four years, and leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The Department of Dentistry was founded in 1882, and 
is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral part of the 
School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1840 as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated with the School 
of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers two years, and leads 
to the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. 

2 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D., Acting Provost. 
F. J. S. Gorgas, M.D., D.D.S. D. M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D. John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D. , LL.D. Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D. 
Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. Daniel Base, Ph.D. 

Edqar H. Gans, LL.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Hon. J. Wirt Randall, LL.D. Hon. Henry Stockb ridge, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Philemon H. Tuck, Esq. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Edgar A. Poe, Esq. 

Hon. John C. Rose. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Joseph G. France, Esq. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Pro-Chancellor, 



The Vice-Chancellor, 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

President of St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS B. V. CECIL, A.M., Sc.D., and C. W. STRYKER, A.M. 
For St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., and 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

For School of Medicine. 

PROFESSORS HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., and W. T. BRANTLY, A.M 

For School of Law. 

PROFESSOR T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 

For School of Dentistry. 

PROFESSOR CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 
For School of Pharmacy. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 



Samuel G. Chew, M.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Medicine. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology. 
Dean of the Faculty. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Chas W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical Medicine. 

Thos. A. Ashbt, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Diseases of Women. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D. ; Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Surgical Pathol- 
ogy. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Jos. L. Hirsh, B.A., M.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and Visit- 
ing Pathologist to the University Hospital. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 

Eugene F. Cordell, A.M., M.D., Professor of the History of Medicine, and 
Librarian. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Harry Adler, B.A., M.D., Professor of Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Dermatology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and 
Hygiene. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

St. Clair Spruill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, B.A., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine, and Associate Profes- 
sor of Physical Therapeutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

J. W. Holland, M. D., Associate Professor and Demonstrator of Anatomy and 
Lecturer on Clinical Surgery. 



''H.J. 



Nathan Winslow, B.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat 

and Nose. 
Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
T. L. Patterson, Pn.D., Associate Professor of Biology and Physiology. 
Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 
G. G. Lockard, M.D., Associate in Medicine, and Director of the Clinical 

Laboratory. 
Wm. Tarun, M.D., Associate in Opthalmoiogy. 
Compton Riely, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 
H. W. Brent, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
J. Holmes Smith, Jr., M.D., Associate in Anatomy. 
A. H. Carroll, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology and Assistant Gastro- 

Enterologist to the University Hospital. 
W. I. Messick, M.D., Lecturer on Clinical Medicine. 
H. C. Hyde, M.D., Lecturer on Pathology and Bacteriology. 
H. W. Stoner, M.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology. 
G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology. 
C. C. Conser, M.D., Demonstrator of Physiology. 
G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology and Embryology. 
H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Demonstrator of Materia Medica. 
H. C. Davis, M.D., Demonstrator of Laryngology. 

John A. Tompkins, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Minor Surgery and Bandaging. 
J. D. Reeder, M.D., Instructor in Proctology. 
J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
G. M. Settle, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
R. C. Metzel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
J. F. O'Mara, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
H. W. Jones, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
H. D. McCarty, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
F. S. Lynn, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. J. Kirby. M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Henry Chandlee. M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Leo Karlinsky, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

W. F. Sowers, M.D., Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Physiology. 
H. U. Todd, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Pathology. 
E. H. Kloman, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Pathology. 

5 



Dispensary Physicians and Chiefs of Clinics. 



John Houfp, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., S. R. Clarke, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of 
Medicine. H. M. Robinson, M.D., J. E. O'Neill, M.D., E. H. Perkins, 
M.D., R. C. Harley, M.D., W. G. Clopton, M.D., Assistants. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery. R. P. Bay, 
M.D., John A. Tompkins, Jr., M.D., J. Holmes Smith, Jr., M.D., C. C. 
Smink, M.D., E. H. Kloman, M.D., Assistants. 

G. C. Lockard, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Pediatrics. R. C. 
Harley, M.D., A. L. Hornstein, M.D., C. L. Schmidt, M.D., Assistants. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., W. K. White, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willse, 
M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases, 
E. A. Looper, M.D., W. G. Queen, M.D., Assistants. 

J. R. Abercrombie, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 

A- H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Stom- 
ach. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose. H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

Walter S. Niblett, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Orthopedic Sur- 
gery. 

A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Genito-Urinary 
Diseases. F. S. Lynn, M.D., Assistant. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Neurology and Psy- 
chiatry. J. F. Hawkins, M.D., A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistants. 

J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Proctology. 



Mr. A. D. Johnson, Secretary to the Dean and Superintendent of College 
Buildings. • 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest institutions of medical education in America, having been 
chartered in 1807, under the title of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land. 

Five years later, in 1812, by authority of the General Assembly 
of Maryland, the College of Medicine of Maryland was empowered 
to annex to itself three other colleges or faculties, viz: The Faculty 
of Divinity, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four faculties or colleges thus united were "constituted an 
University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

The Medical School of the University is thus its oldest department 
and ranks fifth, in point of age, among the medical colleges of the 
United States. 

Throughout the century of its existence it has always taken 
rank as one of the leading medical colleges of the South, and among 
the most widely known and most highly honored of the schools 
of medicine of the country. 

Beginning with the modest number of five, composing the first 
graduating class in 1810, the list of graduates in medicine of the 
University of Maryland, now numbers five thousand eight hundred 
and sixty-six names, drawn from all parts of the United States 
and from abroad, among which are to be found some of the most 
noted names connected with the history of medicine in our country. 

While from the foundation of the University of Maryland, the 
policy of the Faculty of Physic has been one of wise conservatism, 
it has, at the same time, never been behindhand in the march of 
educational progress, and while retaining for so long a time as they 
were of real value, those features of older educational methods which 
were wisest and best, they have often been first, and always among 
the first, in the adoption of all measures tending to improvement in 
methods of medical teaching, and to true elevation of the standard 
of medical education. 



In illustration of this we may mention the following fact*: 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland was th« 
first medical school in America to make dissecting a compulsory 
part of the curriculum. [1833.] 

It established one of the first Medical Libraries and the first 
Medical College Library in the country. [1813.] 

It was among the first to teach Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence. 
[1883.] 

It was the first to give instruction in Dentistry. [1837.] 

It was among the first to meet the modern demand for instruction 
in specialties. [1866.] 

It was the first medical school in America to establish separate 
and independent chairs of Diseases of Women and Children [January, 
1867], and of Eye and Ear Diseases. [1873.] 

It was among the very first to provide for adequate clinical instruc- 
tion by the erection of its own hospital, available at all times for the 
use of the students. [1823.] 

It is the aim of the present Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland to carry out this policy established by its predecessors. 

With this end in view, the Faculty has, in the last few years, 
expended, and is now expending, large amounts in the establishment 
and equipment of its Lying-in Hospital, its Laboratories of Chemistry, 
Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, in the erection of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, which was completed in 1897, and in the erection of 
a new Laboratory Building, just completed, and is therefore in a 
position to offer to students of medicine and graduates a course of 
combined didactic, clinical and laboratory instruction which will 
compare favorably with that offered by any medical school in the 
United States. 

The details of this course will be found in the following announce- 
ment of the one hundred and sixth annual course of instruction 
of the School of Medicine of the Universitv of Marvland. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTH ANNUAL 
COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



SESSION 1912-1913. 

The One Hundred and Sixth Annual Session of the School of 
Medicine of the University of Maryland will begin on Tuesday, 
October 1, 1912, and terminate on June 1, 1913. During the session 
there is a vacation from December 23, 1912, to January 3, 1913, and 
there are no lectures on Thanksgiving Day and Washington's Birth- 
day. 

Clinical lectures introductory to the regular session are given 
daily throughout September. 

COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

Four annual graded courses of not less than eight months each 
will be required for graduation. Every applicant for advanced 
standing will be required to present satisfactory evidence of having 
attended courses reasonably equivalent to those already attended 
by the class to which he seeks admission; to be examined for admis- 
sion in all the subjects in which the said class shall have been exam- 
ined already, or to present satisfactory certificates of having passed 
successfully examinations upon those subjects. Opportunity for 
taking such examinations will be afforded previous to the opening 
of each annual session. 

The system of instruction for the four years' graded course, with 
the number of hours in each week devoted to each subject, is shown 
in the following schedule: 

First Year. 

Physiology. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. 

Demonstrations, 3 hours. 

Chemistry. — Illustrated lectures on General Chemistry. 2 hours. Prof. Coale. 

Laboratory work, 6 hours. Prof. Base. 

Anatomy. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. Prof. Holland. 

Osteology. — Recitations and demonstrations in class sections, 2 hours. Dr. 
J. H. Smith, Jr. 

Dissections, by class sections, daily 2\ hours. Prof. Holland and assistants. 

Materia Medica. — Lectures and recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Shipley. 
Laboratory work, 1 hour. Dr. Sinsky. 

Normal Histology and Embryology. — Laboratory work and demonstrations, G 

hours. Dr. Maldeis and assistants. 

History of Medicine, 1 hour. Prof. Cordell. 

9 



The class divisions are so arranged that work in the laboratories* 
and dissecting-room is evenly distributed throughout the term. 

At the end of the first year examinations are held in Osteology, 
Anatomy, Physiology, and the Laboratory Courses in Chemistry, 
Histology and Embryology. 

Second Year. 

Physiology. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. Prof. Hemmeter. 

Laboratory work, 3 hours. 

Surgery. — Bandaging and application of surgical apparatus, 3 hours, in class 
sections. Dr. Tompkins. 

Chemistry. — Illustrated lectures on Organic and Physiological Chemistry, 1 
hour. Prof. Coale. 

Laboratory work, 4 hours. 

Anatomy. — Lectures, recitations and demonstrations. 3 hours. Prof. Smith. 

Dissections by class sections, daily 2\ hours. Prof. Holland and assistants. 

Materia Medica. — Lectures and recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Shipley. 

Laboratory work, 2 hours. Prof. Shipley and Dr. Sinsky. 

Medical Jurisprudene and Hygiene, 1 hour. Prof. J. T. Smith. 

Bacteriology. — Lectures and laboratory work, 10 hours, half session. Prof. 
Hirsh and assistants. 

Pathology. — Lectures and demonstrations, 1 hour. Prof. Hirsh. 

Laboratory work, 6 hours. Prof. Hirsh and assistants. 
s Physical Diagnosis. — Class sections, 1 hour. Dr. Lockard. 

At the end of the second term the student, before being admitted 
to the third year's class, must stand final examinations in Anatomy , 
Materia Medica, Physiology, Chemistry, Medical Jurisprudence and 
Hygiene, General Pathology, Bacteriology, State Medicine, the 
application of surgical apparatus and bandaging and all Laboratory 
Courses. He must also produce evidence that his work in the dis- 
secting-room and laboratories has been satisfactory. Should he fail 
to pass a successful examination in any of these branches, a second 
opportunity will be afforded him at the opening of the regular session 
in the autumn; failing in this, such studies for the .second year must 
be repeated. 

Third Year. 

Practice of Medicine. — Lectures and recitations, 3 hours. 

Clinical Lectures and Conferences at University Hospital, 1 hour. Prof. 
Mitchell. 

Diseases of Children. — Clinical Conferences at University Hospital, 1 
hour. Prof. Mitchell. 

Diseases of Women. — Lectures and recitations, 1 hour. Prof. Ashby. Clin- 
ical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Ashby. 

Physical Diagnosis. — Class sections, 1 hour. Instructors in medicine. 

Eye and Ear Diseases. — Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 1 hour. 
Prof. Woods. 

10 



Surgery. — Lectures and recitations on General Surgery, 3 hours. Prof. 
Shipley: 

Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Winslow and 
assistants. 

Clinics and recitations at the City Hospital, 1 hour. Prof. Shipley and 
assistants. 

Demonstrations in Operative Surgerj r in class sections, 1 hour. Profs. Martin 
Spruill and N. Winslow. 

Obstetrics. — Lectures, 2 hours. Prof. Neale. 

Demonstrations, practical instruction with the manikin, and recitations, 1 
hour. 

Clinical Obstetrics at Maternity Hospital, 1 hour. 

Therapeutics. — Lectures and recitations, 2 hours. Prof. Adler. 

Physical Therapeutics. — Lectures and recitations, 1 hour, Prof. Gichner. 

Special Pathology. — Lectures and demonstrations, 4 hours. Prof. Hirsh. 

Laboratory work and demonstrations, 6 hours, half session. Prof. Hirsh 
and assistants. 

Neurology. — Lectures, 1 hour. Prof. Spear. 

Special Clinics. — Diseases of the Nervous System, 1 hour. Prof. Spear. 

Clinical Pathology. — Class sections, 6 hours. Dr. Lockard. 

At the end of the third session the stu lent is admitted to exam- 
ination in Principles and Practice of Medicine, Therapeutics, Obstet- 
rics, Diseases of Women, Principles of Surgery, Pathology, Operative 
Surgery, and Clinical Pathology. 

Fourth Year. 

Practice of Medicine. — Clinical lectures and conferences at University 
Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Wilson. 

Clinical lectures, Bayview Hospital. Professors of Clinical Medicine. 

Ward and dispensary instruction, 6 hours. Professors of Clinical Medicine. 

Diseases of Children. — Lectures and recitations, 1 hour. Prof. Mitchell. 

Clinical conference, 1 hour. Prof. Mitchell. 

Dispensary instruction, 1 hour, class sections. Prof. Mitchell and assistants. 

Diseases of Women. — Clinical lectures, ward and dispensary instruction, 4 
hours. Profs. Ashby and Hundley. 

Eye and Ear Diseases. — Lectures, 2 hours. Prof. Woods. 

Clinical lecture, 1 hour, class sections. Prof. Woods. 

Demonstrations, Eye and Ear Hospital, 2 hours. Drs. Chisolm, Gibbons, 
Fleming and Johnston. 

Demonstrations, Eye and Ear Dispensary, 1 hour. 

Surgery. — Clinical lectures at University Hospital, 2 hours. Prof. Winslow 
and assistants. 

Lecture and clinical conference in Surgery, 3 hours. Prof. Winslow. 

W r ard and dispensary instruction, 6 hours, class sections. Prof. Winslow and 
assistants. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. — 1 hour. Prof. Timberlake. 

Orthopedic Surgery. — University Hospital, 1 hour. Prof. Taylor. 

Demonstrations at the J. L. Kernan Hospital for Crippled Children, 1 hour. 
Prof. Taylor. • 

11 



State Medicine. — Lectures and conference, 1 hour. Prof. Fulton. 

Ohste.trics. — Clinical conference, 1 hour. Prof. Neale. 

Attendance upon labor cases in and out of hospital. Ward classes, 4 hours. 

History of Medicine. — 1 hour. Prof. Cordell. 

Diseases of the Throat and Nose. — Clinical lectures, 1 hour. Prof. J. R. 
Winslow. 

Dispensary instruction, 6 hours, class sections. Drs. Johnston and Davis. 

Nervous and Mental Diseases. — Lectures, 1 hour. Clinics, 1 hour. Prof. 
Spear. Ward classes, 2 hours. Prof. Spear and assistants. 

Dispensary Instruction, class sections, ft hours. Prof. Spear and Assistants. 

Weekly clinics at the City Hospital during January, February and March. 
Prof. Spear. 

Special Clinics. — Diseases of the Skin, 1 hour. Prof. Gilchrist. 

Diseases of the Stomach, 1 hour. Prof. Hemmeter. 

At the end of the fourth year the student is admitted to the final 
examinations upon Medicine, Diseases of Children. Diseases of Eye 
and Ear, Surgery, Clinical Obstetrics, and the other special clinical 
courses, and upon passing ruccessfully upon these branches will be 
admitted to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

Throughout the entire period of existence of the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland, clinical teaching has always been 
a prominent and important feature in the course of instruction. 

The ownership and exclusive control by the Faculty of Physic 
of the University Hospital and the Maternity Hospital of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, and the clinical privileges enjoyed by the Univer- 
sity in the Presbyterian Eye, Ear and Throat Charity Hospital, 
the Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Children, Bayview Hospital, 
and other institutions for the sick in the city, place the Faculty in 
a position to make unusually prominent this important feature of 
a medical course, and have enabled it to organize and carry into effect 
a system of thorough clinical teaching whereby each member of the 
several class sections is brought into direct personal contact with 
the cases under examination. 

In addition to the regular daily clinical lectures in the amphi- 
theater, much attention is given to this strictly bedside instruction. 

The students, in small classes, are required to accompany the 
physician or surgeon through the wards of the hospital, and are there 
trained in making diagnosis, in the dressing of wounds, the applica- 
tion of splints, plaster jackets and other appliances, and in use of 

12 



the ophthalmoscope and laryngoscope, and are enabled to observe 
the progress of cases under treatment. 

In the Dispensaries and Out-patient Departments, students have 
similar opportunities of familiarizing themselves with methods of 
diagnosis and treatment in the various specialties of medicine and 
surgery, and of observation of such cases as do not require confine- 
ment in bed. 

To the student of medicine the value of the training and encour- 
agement thus afforded him in habits of close and accurate observation, 
of self-possession and self-reliance, in the future practice of his profes- 
sion, can hardly be overestimated. 



HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in 
accommodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new 
and modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the former 
building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 
etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 

13 



convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as the 

MARINE HOSPITAL. 

for foreign seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a ship- 
ping point brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the 
world, and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the insti- 
tution give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admis- 
sion. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY OR OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

This department of the University Hospital furnishes a most 
abundant supply of material for clinical instruction. During the 
past year the number of visits made by patients to the various 
departments of the Dispensary was 25,791. 

The whole department is arranged and thoroughly organized to 
facilitate the classification of the patients coming under treatment 
and their distribution to the various professors giving clinical lectures. 

During the intervals between the sessions the regular clinics are 
continued in the amphitheater, and there is also, each day, a bedside 

14 



clinic in the hospital and service in the Dispensary. It will thus be 
seen that the school offers unusual facilities for clinical study dur- 
ing its regular session, and that the continuance of the clinics during 
the year affords opportunity to such students and graduates as can 
spend their time in the city. 

Attention is called to the fact that during the intervals between 
the sessions, from June to October, students have the advantage of 
three hours of clinical instruction daily, between the hours of 11 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 

RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Accommodations are provided in dormitories adjacent to the hos- 
pital for resident students. To these are assigned wards in the 
hospital, with attendance upon the sick, under the daily supervision 
of the professors of the University and resident house officers. 
Special attention is called to the fact that in this institution under- 
graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of con- 
stant observation of the sick and of receiving daily bedside instruc- 
tion from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is 
the rule adopted, in order that the experience of the students may 
be as varied as possible. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

Three resident physicians are annually appointed to this hospital 
from among the graduates of the University. 

For purposes of instruction in this most important branch, the 
members of the Senior Class, after a course of instruction by the 
Demonstrator of Obstetrics on the manikin, are taken in sections of 
two students each, into the wards of the hospital, where, under the 
direct and immediate supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and 
his Chief of Clinic, they are thoroughly instructed in vaginal exami- 

15 



nation and the antiseptic precautions to be taken in making such 
examination, abdominal palpation, the diagnosis of presentations, 
and in the treatment of pregnant women preparatory to labor. 
The sections of the graduating class are assigned in rotation to 
attend labor cases in the hospital, and arrangements are perfected 
whereby members of the section are summoned without delay at 
any hour when labor occurs. 

Students are thus afforded opportunities under the immediate 
supervision of the instructor to become familiar with the mechanism 
of labor in all its stages, and have frequent opportunities to witness 
the application of forceps, and the methods of treatment of the 
various complications of labor. Much attention is also paid to their 
instruction in the subsequent treatment of mother and child. 

The out-door clinic is thoroughly organized, and after instruction 
in the hospital, students of the graduating class are allotted to attend 
labor cases at the homes of patients, under supervision of the 
Professor of Obsetetrics, his Chief of Clinic, or either of the resident 
physicians of the Lying-in Hospital whenever complications or 
difficulties arise. Each student will be required to conduct and keep 
accurate record of at least ten confinement cases, under the super- 
vision of the attending physician. 

During the past session an average number of forty cases of labor 
were seen by each student of the graduating class. 

By this system of combined didactic, practical, and clinical meth- 
ods of teaching, students of this University are afforded opportunities 
for instruction in this most important branch of medical science 
which are equaled by very few other schools and surpassed by none. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which was founded in 1877, largely through the 
efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the largest 
special hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1910 there were admitted to the Dispensary and 
Hospital, 11,068 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

The course in Ophthalmology and Otology consists of one didactic 
lecture weekly, throughout the year, with quizzes on the lectures, 
and one weekly clinic at University Hospital. These are conducted 

16 



by Prof. Woods. Students are assigned in groups to the Eye and 
Ear Department of the University Hospital Dispensary, where they 
can see the cases, under Dr. Wm.Tarun, Associate in Ophthalmology. 
From about the middle of November, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 
Prof. Woods meets sections of the class at the Presbyterian Eye, 
Ear and Throat Hospital, where the large clinic affords ample oppor- 
tunities for seeing eye and ear diseases. Dr. Richard H. Johnston, 
of the Nose and Throat Department at the University, is also a 
surgeon of the Presbyterian Hospital. The hospital is open at 2 p.m. 
each day. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL FOR CRIPPLED 

CHILDREN. 

This Orthopedic Hospital, with some sixty-five beds, is the only 
specially equipped institution exclusively for crippled children south 
of Philadelphia, and is supplied with all facilities for the most 
advanced methods of treatment. 

It is most beautifully and hygienically situated at " Radnor Park," 
Hillsdale, a suburb of Baltimore readily reached by the street cars. 

Professor R. Tunstall Taylor is Surgeon-in-Chief. 

The Out-Patient Department is situated in the city, and students 
have access to clinical instruction there on Tuesdays, Thursdays 
and Saturdays from 10 to 12 o'clock. 

Bedside instruction is given weekly at " Radnor Park" by Pro- 
fessor Taylor or the resident surgeon. 

Professor Taylor also gives a clinical and didactic lecture once a 
week at the University Hospital. 

THE CITY HOSPITAL. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of this hospital of 2000 
beds to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are 
daily visits and climes by the teachers of the University in medicine 
and surgery at that institution, and the dead-house furnishes a great 
abundance and variety of pathological material, which is used for 
demonstration. The Insane Department contains 250 beds. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of the Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry, aided by the Demonstrators. Each stu- 

17 



dent during; his course has assigned him a table and is fully supplied 
with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, tree of charge, except 
for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department . 

The course of instruction embraces: 1. Training in the proper care 
and use of apparatus and in the manipulative processes used in the 
laboratory. 2. The experimental study of the more important 
elements and compounds, and the repetition of experiments performed 
in the course of lectures. 3. Instruction in the elements of qual- 
itative analysis. 



LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteids as well as a detailed course in the 
chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which ma} r result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 
The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, will be 
given the opportunity under suitable regulations. 



LABORATORY OF PRACTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped with the latest and most improved 
apparatus from the Harvard Scientific Apparatus Co., and Zimmer- 
mann of Leipzig. 

Each student is trained to become familiar with the phenomena 
of life by objective and personal study. 

An abundant supply of material is provided for experiment and 
demonstration. 

The laboratory is also well adapted for post-graduate study and 
special research in Physiology, for which opportunity will be given 
under suitable regulations. 

IS 



LABORATORY OF NORMAL HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

Instruction in this department is given, for six hours weekly, 
and attendance is obligatory for all first-year students. The course 
of instruction embraces the method of using the microscope and 
its accessories; methods of hardening, cutting, staining and mounting 
the various tissues, together with frequent demonstrations of micro- 
scopical anatomy of the different organs and tissues of the body. 
The department is also well supplied with numerous mounted speci- 
mens for the instructions of students. 

LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGICAL HISTOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

In addition to the opportunities which are afforded students for 
the study of gross pathology by the weekly lectures and demonstra- 
tions, and by attendance upon the autopsies at University and 
Bayview Hospitals, laboratory instruction is also given in Pathologi- 
cal Histology and Bacteriology, for which purposes the autopsies fur- 
nish an abundant supply of material. 

Ten hours weekly are devoted to this instruction, which is obliga- 
tory on all second- and third-year students. 

The course of instruction embraces the preparation and study of 
sections illustrating the common lesions of the various organs; the 
miscroscopic examination of urinary sediments; the various methods 
of isolating and identifying microorganisms, and the method of 
staining important microorganisms. 

Graduates and advanced students qualified to profit by such work, 
desiring to undertake special lines of investigation in this depart- 
ment, will be afforded excellent opportunities for study. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY. 

The third-year class, divided into small sections, is given instruc- 
tions in examination of blood, urine, sputum, feces, and stomach 
contents, under the direction of Dr. Lockard. The Laboratory 
is thoroughly equipped. 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY. 

The dissecting-room is in charge of the Demonstrator, who super- 
intends and directs the classes in their dissection. The rooms are 
convenient, well warmed, ventilated and lighted. The Demon- 

19 



-« 



strator and his assistants pass much of their time in assisting the 
students and in guiding their labors. Access may be had to the 
rooms daily, between the hours of 3 and 6 p.m.. 

Dissecting tickets must be countersigned by the Demonstrator 
as an evidence of satisfactory dissection. 
Dissecting material is furnished in abundance, free of charge. 

THE LIBRARY. 

The Library, founded in 1813, now contains 10,500 volumes, and 
is open daily during the year for the use of the members of the 
Faculty, students and the profession generally. During the past 
year 680 volumes were added. 

The more commodious quarters in the newly acquired Davidge 
Hall have promoted very much its growth and usefulness. 

It is well stocked with recent literature, and one hundred and 
forty-nine journals are regularly received. The pamphlets number 
7000. 

DENTAL INFIRMARY. 

The Dental Department of the University of Maryland is situated 
upon the University grounds, fronting on Greene Street, and adjoin- 
ing the building of the School of Medicine. 

Daily clinics are held in this department in the afternoon from 
2 to 5 o'clock, which are open to students of the School of Medicine, 
and offer excellent opportunities to students intending to practice 
in the country to familiarize themselves with dental operations. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

By arrangements recently concluded between the two institutions, 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, established in 1840, and widely 
and favorably known as one of the oldest and most prominent of 
the institutions of its kind in this country, has become the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, and now occupies 
buildings upon the University grounds. 

The lectures and laboratories in this Department will afford to 
students of the School of Medicine who expect to practice in the 
country, opportunities of acquiring a knowledge of correct methods 
of dispensing medicines which will be of much value in their future 
practice. 

Special courses of instructions in the laboratories of Pharmacy 
may be arranged for upon payment of a moderate fee. 

20 



ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

At the close of each session the following annual appointments 
are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent. 

Five Resident Surgeons. 

Four Resident Physicians. 

Two Resident Gynecologists. 

One Resident Pathologist. 

One Dispensary Physician and Fifteen Chiefs of Clinic. 

TO THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL 

Three Resident Physicians 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants. The fee for such hospital residence 
is one hundred and fifty dollars per year, payable in advance. This 
covers lodging, light and fuel. 

Several appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of the University of Maryland are 
eligible. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination, or both. 

The requirements for the issue of the Medical Student Certificate 
are those prescribed by the rules of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, 
and are as follows: 

(A) A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or Univer- 
sity; or, 

(B) A diploma from an accredited high school, normal school or 
academy requiring for admission evidence of the completion of an 

21 



cight-3 r ear course in primary and intermediate grades, and for gradu- 
ation not less than four years of study embracing two years (4 points) 
of Latin, or four years (8 points) of either high school French or 
German, or its full equivalent, provided a satisfactory examination 
is passed in the elements of Latin grammar; two years (4 points) 
of mathematics; two years (4 points) of English; one year (2 points) 
of history one }^ear (2 points) of physics; and six years (12 points) 
of further credit in language, literature, history or science; or, 

(C) An examination in the following branches, totaling 30 points: 

(a) Required, 16 points. Points. 
Mathematics — 2 years 4 

Algebra and plane geometry. 
English — 2 years 4 

(a) English grammar. 

(b) Rhetoric and composition. 

Latin — 2 years 4 

(a) Latin grammar. 

(b) Latin prose composition. 

(c) Reading four books of Csesar or equivalent. 

Physics — 1 year, with laboratory work 2 

History — 1 year 2 

(b) Elective, 14 points. 
English Language and Literature — 2 years in addition to the required 4 points . 4 
Language — Latin, German, French, Spanish or Greek, 4 years, not less than 

one year in any one 2 

History — 3 years, including civics and political economy 6 

Advanced Mathematics — Solid Geometry and Trigonometry, \ year each. ... 2 
Natural Science — (1 year) Biology, 1 year, or Botany and Zoology, \ year each . 2 

Physical Science — Chemistry or Physics, 1 year 2 

Earth Science — Physical Geography and Geology, | year each 1 

Physiology and Hygiene — f year 1 

Astronomy — § year 1 

Drawing — | year 1 

One point in any subject in a high school or academic course demands not 
less than five periods per week of forty-five minutes for eighteen weeks. 

Two points equal 5 counts, or 1 unit, or 2 credits. 

Conditioned matriculation is not permitted, and all deficiencies 
in credentials presented must be made good by examination before 
the student may be admitted. 

After January 1, 1914, one year of college credits in chemistry, biol- 
logy, physics and a modern language, or two years of work in a college 
of liberal arts will be required in addition to the accredited four-year 
high school course. 

The evaluation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 

22 



iner only, and all st indents whose entrance qualifications arc not clearly 
satisfactory, or whose certificates are not complete, are advised to 
obtain from him or from the Dean blank forms on which to prepare 
a full statement of their previous education, in advance of their 
coming to Baltimore. Such statements to be submitted to the 
Entrance Examiner for his advice as to the course to be pursued. 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Otis, Hall 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 1211 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore. To him must be submitted the credentials of 
all applicants, and by him is issued the certificate upon which the 
student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 
medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 
ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course future difficul- 
ties may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, without 
being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, is by contract 
of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's College 
and who have made an approved choice of electives may if they desire 
it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical School of the 
University. If they successfully complete the work of the first med- 
ical year they are graduated with their class with the degree of A.B. 
from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work of 
the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and for 
four years he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seven years the M.D. degree, but credit from the Med- 
ical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit has already 
been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 



23 



GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica 
and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $100. 

STATUTES. 

1 . Cards for completed courses will be issued by the Dean at the 
end of the session. Laboratory tickets and tickets for practical 
anatomy must be countersigned by the proper demonstrators and 
directors. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket will not be 
accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. Every candidate must have passed examinations in the vari- 
ous branches of medicine taught in this school, or show satisfactory 
evidence of having done so in other schools, and also produce evi- 
dence of satisfactory work in practical anatomy and the various 
laboratories. Attendance upon all clinical lectures is obligatory. 

3. Any student failing in more than one-half the yearly exami- 
nations shall be required to repeat the work of the year and shall not 
be allowed to advance with his class. Students deficient in less than 
one-half the year's work are permitted to make up their deficiency 
in the fall examinations. All students are required to stand the 
spring examinations unless excused by the Dean. No student will 
be permitted to enter the third-year class who has not completed all 
first-year work, and no student will be permitted to enter the fourth- 
year class who has not completed all second-year work. 

A student required to repeat the work of the first, second or 
third year will be permitted to do so upon payment of the matri- 
culation fee only. 

4. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
treasurer before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

5. Examinations for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are con- 
ducted by the several professors. 

A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be charged the regular fees for tuition, etc., 
and will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
should he be permitted to again enter the school as a candidate for 
graduation. 

24 



6. The judgment of the Faculty upon the fitness of a candidate 
is based upon the knowledge of his general attendance and industry, 
character and habits, as well as upon the results of his final exami- 
nations. 

ANNUAL LIMITATION OF RULES AND FEES. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1913, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum requirements for graduation, fee, and all 
the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year) $5 . 00 

Tuition fee (each year) 150 . 00 

Graduation fee 30 . 00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, or 
for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases for 
materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and paj^able during October, and if the entire 
amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tuition 
fee for that year will be $145. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this insti- 
tution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning Octo- 
ber 1, 1912. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first full 
course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses, $25 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this Uni- 
versity, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, "to 

25 



a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year stu- 
dent only, who has successfully completed one year's work in the 
medical course, and no man may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of inability 
to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Classes of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
w r ork up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance.' ' 

The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the 
Faculty of Pr^sic to a student of the Senior Class who presents to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and that 
he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

26 



The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition 
fee of that year. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of students' personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 




$ 18 

"96 

48 
35 
10 


% 32 

5 
112 
65 

50 

20 


$ 50 




10 




128 




80 




100 


All other expenses 


75 


Total 


$207 


$284 


$443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Superinten- 
dent of buildings, who may be found at his office on the premises, 
will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts of students. 

For further information, apply to 

R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



27 



MATRICULATES FOR 1911-1912. 



POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Charles B aglet, Jr., M.D Maryland. 

W. P. B. Bell Virginia. 

James J. Carroll, M.D Maryland. 

Frederick Henry Herrmann*, M.D Maryland. 

Foster Cannon Howard Maryland. 

J. W. P. Jarvis, M.D West Virginia. 

Charles L. Maqruder Maryland. 

Beverly L. Noe, M.D West Virginia. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D Maryland. 

Abraham Reinfield New Jersey. 

James Jackson Stewart, M.D North Carolina. 

Charles B. Williams, M.D West Virginia. 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Name State Preceptor 

Abell, Robert E Soutk Carolina Davidson College. 

Allgood, Reese Alexander South Carolina Dr. J . L. Valley. 

Allison, Robert Glenn South Carolina Dr. J. S. Barron. 

Aviles, Angel Virgilio Ecuador Central Univ. of Quito. 

Battle, George Ctjllen North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Beard, Grover C North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Berngartt, Bernard Mark Maryland 

Bishop. Harry A Dist. of Columbia Baltimore Med. College. 

Bonner. Robert A Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Buchanan, Sidney E North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Chipman, W. Thomas Delaivare Dr. W. H. Chlpman. 

Clatjtice, Charles P Maryland 

Claytor, W. Rivers South Carolina Dr. H. Claytor. 

Cochran, James D North Carolina 

Connors, Thomas Joseph Connecticut Dr. C. W. Fuller. 

D alton, James Thomas Canada McGlll University. 

Darby. John Dade Maryland Md. Agric. College. 

Dean, Russell H., Jr Florida Dr. R. H. Dean. 

Deibel, Harry Maryland Dr. Harry Gross. 

Disbrow. George Ward New Jersey 

Donovan, John Bernard Maine Dr. J. A. Donovan. 

Duggan. James Archie Georgia 

Ebert, John William Virginia Dr. S. P. Latane. 

Fabian, Harry Alabama 

Frey, Ernest William Maryland 

Gallion, William E., Jb Maryland Dr. Curran. 

George, Dawson Orme Maryland Dr. Enoch George. 

Gladstone, Charles F Virginia 

Goldstein, Abraham New York 

Haines, William Granville Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Hair, Judson Elam, Jr South Carolina 

Helfgott, Nathan Dist . of Columbia Georgetown University. 

Helfgott, Max A Dist. of Columbia Georgetown University 

Hennessey, Edward H. J Connecticut Dr. Wm, H. Conklin. 

Hinnant, Milford North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Hubbard, James Edward Maryland St. John's College. 

Irwin. Henderson, B. S North Carolina Univ. of Va. 

Johnson, Edward Sooy Maryland Dr. J. A. Riley. 

Johnston, John Kent Florida 

28 



Nam i2 S-tatb Pbecbptob 

Joslin, Cjiarle CMNQ Maryland 

Judd, Clarence W Pennsylvania Dr. Alfred P. Gray. 

Kahn, M. Randolph Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Kolb, Edwin P Maryland New Windsor College. 

Lawler, Daniel H Connecticut Dr. J. A. Coogan. 

Lebret, Gerard Henry New Jersey Dr. A. E. Wrensch, Jr. 

Lenzner, Simon Geilech New York 

Lichtenberg, Moses Louis Maryland Baltimore City Colleg >. 

Lillich, Bertrand Allen, Phar.D Pennsylvania 

Livingston, Everett A North Carolina 

Llamas, Enrique Colombia, S. A 

Looper, Edward Anderson Georgia Dr. W. S. Elkln. 

McGoooan, Benjamin J North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Martin, Andres G Cuba Collegiate Prep. School. 

Michel, William Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Newhouse, Benjamin Maryland Dr. E. Deichmann. 

Norton, John C Maryland Dr. M. A. O'Neill. 

Parlett, Roger V Maryland St. John's College. 

Patrick, R. Bruce, A.B South Carolina Ereklne College. 

Peart.stein, Phillip Texas 

Rauschenbach, Charles William, Phar.D Maryland Md. Coll. of Phar. 

Rich, Herman Harrt New Jersey Dr. W. Winters. 

Rottenberq, Joseph Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Scott, Wilbur Moate Georgia Dr. W. S. Elkln. 

Sharp, Jat D., B.S Indiana Valparaiso College. 

Sherrill, Everett Alanson, B.S North Carolina 

Silberm an, D avid Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Skladowskt, John A Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Stallworth, Clarke J Alabama Dt. W. H. Taylor. 

Stansbury, John C Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Stem, Grover A Maryland Dr. Edwin D. Cronk. 

Stevens, Thomas F. A., Phar. D Maryland Md. Coll. of Phar. 

Stilley. Jesse Cunningham Pennsylvania Dr. W. J. Brysou. 

Straessley, Edward Charlks Pennsylvania Dr. F. X. Straossley. 

Terry, William C, M.D North Carolina N. C Med. College. 

Traband, John Henry, Jr Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Vega, Luis G., A.B Cuba Instltuto de O.lente. 

Vinciguebra, Michael New Jersey Dr. A. Bianchl. 

Webb, Harold Homer Virginia 

Whitaker, Edwin Viqnes Louisiana Dr. T. L. Mills. 

Whitaker, F. Stanly North Carolina Dr. W. O. Nesbit. 

Wiener, Hyman R Pennsylvania Dr. J. E. Gleaner. 

Williams, Robert Cleveland North Carolina Dr. R. S. Carr. 

Yeaqeb. W. Howard Pennsylvania Dr. J. H. Vastine. 

Zimmerman, Henby Massachusetts Hartford High School. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Alexander, S. A North Carolina Univ. of N. G 

Bean, Philip Jenifer Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Beavers. John Thomas North Carolina Univ. of N. C 

Blalock, B. Karl North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Breeding, Earlb Griffith, B.A Maryland Washington College. 

Buch, J. M., A.B Cuba Instltuto de Orlente. 

Butler. H. W Brazil, S. A Dr. G. Butler. 

Callahan. Frank F Maryland Colle?late Prep. School. 

Casleb, Fbank G West Virginia West Virginia Univ. 

Cavanaugh, Leo M Maryland Dr. A. Leo Franklin. 

Choatb, Posey Leff North Carolina Dr. B. 0. Choate. 

Cobb, Ross B Pennsylvania Dr. Thos. S. Cullen. 

29 



Name State Preceptor 

Condon, Vernon H Maryland Dr. E. H. Condon. 

Councill, Wilford A. Hall Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Craven, Franklin Clyde North Carolina 

Detrick, Frederick Louis Virginia Dr. Wm. Dabney. 

Devine, Frederick R Rhode Island Dr. Edw. Gill 

Di Stefano, Dominick Maryland Dr. E. G. Welch. 

Edwards, Charles Reid Maryland Adamstown High School. 

Edwards, Vertie Edward North Carolina 

English, Ernest Lafayette North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Fajardo, Id alberto H Cuba Dr. J. M. Infante. 

Flickinger, William H Pennsylvania Dr. H. W. Woods. 

Gannon, Charles Henry Rhode Island 

Gavlas, Frank E Pennsylvania Jefferson Med. College. 

GeMMiLL, Frank W Pennsylvania Dr. David Posey. 

Goldsmith, Harry Maryland Baltimore City Collese. 

Gould, Nathaniel Jay Virginia Norfolk High School. 

Graves, Jesse C Arkansas 

Hays, Leonard Maryland Dr. E. B. White. 

Hayworth, Claudius Abu ah North Carolina N. C. Med. College. 

Heid, Edward F Pennsylvania Dr. Geo. F. Heid. 

Hemphill, Clyde Hoke North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Holmes, Everett J Maine 

Holstein, Aaron Louis New Jersey 

Ivish, Paul A New Jersey Dr. McChesney. 

Lecates, Howard E Delaware Laurel High School. 

Levin, Herman Harry Connecticut Tufts College. 

McDaniel, Frederick Leonard Alabama Dr. W. S. Elkin. 

Martin, William Tillman South Carolina Dr. A. R. Hunter. 

Murphy, Franklin Dashiell Maryland 

Murray, James Henry, Jr Maryland Dr. Cawood. 

Nance. Fuller, Ph.G Maryland 

Neistadt, C. S Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Newcomer, Elmer Maryland 

Kitsch, Norbert Charles, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Joseph's College. 

Norment, Richard Baxter, Jr Maryland Dr. R. B. Norment. 

Ostendorf, Walter A Maryland 

Perez, Herman Marino, Lit.B Cuba Institute de Oriente. 

Phillips, John C Georgia 

Pratt, T. Ruffin North Carolina Dr. Thos. Taylor. 

Raysor, Harry C South Carolina Wofford College. 

Scruggs, Wm. H., Jr Georgia Mercer Univ. 

Sellers, Robert Raymond Ohio Dr. V. H. Tuttle. 

Shuler, G. Clyde Virginia 

Sirak, William W Pennsylvania 

Slusher, Hamilton J Virginia 

Smith, David A Pennsylvania 

Smith, Manly Coke South Carolina Dr. A. R. Hunter. 

Sparck, Joseph Maryland 

Spoore, Compton New York Dr. H. Burwell. 

Stoneham, H. Graham Virginia 

Tannenb aum, Frank New Jersey 

Toulson, W. Houston, A.B Maryland Washington College. 

Travers, Edgar E Maryland Virginia Military Inst. 

Troxler, Moody R North Carolina 

Tullidge, E. Kilbourne Pennsylvania Dr. Geo. B. Tullidge. 

Warner, Theodore B Maryland 

Wells, Grady Brice South Carolina Dr. H. R. Wells. 

Whelchel, Cleveland Davis Georgia Dr. W. S. Elkin. 

Williams, Lester Lonnie North Carolina Univ. of N. C. 

Woods, Thomson Butler South Carolina 

30 






Name State Preceptor 

Wrightson, William South Carolina 

de Yoanna, Alfred Aurelius New York Dr. A. de Yoanna. 

de Yoanna, Saverio Aureliuo Nciv York Dr. A. de Yoanna. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Avakian, Vosgan A., A.B Turkey Euphrates College. 

Ayres, Charles C Maryland.. Jarrettsvllle High School. 

Balart, Antonio Cuba Charlotte Hall Academy. 

Barber, Yates Middleton Virginia William and Mary College. 

Barr, Walter Stuart South Carolina Davidson College. 

Benard, Albert Nicaragua Dr. S. Castrlllo. 

Blake. Lowrie Wilson South Carolina 

Bogart, Clark S Pennsylvania .Bradford High School. 

Boylan, Lawrence B New Jersey 

Bradley, Theron Robert New York Dr. A. D. Wadsworth. 

Bridgers, Harvey C North Carolina Dr. A. S. Brldgers. 

Brogden, James Chester, A.B South Carolina Wofford College. 

Brotman, M. Morton New Jersey Newark High School. 

Byers, Horace Wellington North Carolina Hampden-Sidney College. 

Caldwell, John C South Carolina 

Clark, Haynsworth D Florida Alachua High School. 

Clark, Hugh E Virginia 

Clinton, Roland S North Carolina Dr. H. M. Eddleman. 

Coleman, Alexander Stuart Georgia Dr. Albert Jefferson. 

Collier, Thomas Reed Virginia 

Cook, LeCompte Maryland St. John's College. 

Crist, George Bruce Maryland Dr. F. D. Harshman. 

Davis, Theodore McCann South Carolina Dr. R. E. Houston. 

Denny, Walter L., Jr Maryland Colleiate Prep. School. 

Dodson, James Furman South Carolina ,. Furman University. 

Dovell, Chauncey Elmo Virginia William and Mary College. 

Echeverria, Jose R Florida Tampa High School. 

Esslinger, Richard I., Phar.D Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Fenby, John Smith Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Grant, Harry Clifford North Carolina 

Guistwhite, Bruce H Pennsylvania Dr. H. B. Hetrick. 

Habliston, Charles Carroll, Phar.D Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Hassell, Cecil S North Carolina Dr. S. Hassell. 

Hicks, Claud B., A.B North Carolina Trinity College. 

Hoke, Clarence C, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Mary's College. 

Horger, Eugene Leroy, A.B South Carolina Wofford College. 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland Dr. E. G. Comegys. 

Johnson, Raymond Lovejoy, Ph.G Florida Dr. A. B. Beall. 

Katzenberger, James Wesley, A.B Maryland Mt. St. Joseph's College. 

Kean, Thomas S Maryland Dr. A. Leo Franklin. 

Layton, Edward Gordon South Carolina 

Levin, Morris Benjamin Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Limbaugh, Louie M Florida Duval High School. 

Lipnick, Alexander Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Love, Samuel Glenn South Carolina Dr. William Love. 

Lutz, John Francis, A.B Maryland St. John's College. 

McFadden, Albert David Alabama Dr. W. S. Elkin. . 

Markell, Solomon Charles Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Metcalfe, Challice Hagdon Maryland Washington College. 

Morales, Jose, Ph.G., A.B Cuba University of Habana. 

Mordecai, Alfred North Carolina Dr. C. J. Parleir. 

Munnerlyn, Joseph Francis, A.B South Carolina Wofford College. 

Ostro, Marcus Delaware Dr. J. Ostro. 

Penebaz, Fernando Cuba 

31 



Name State Preceptor 

Perkins, Edwin Hebden Maryland Dr. E. Deichmann. 

Portuondo, Albert Leocadis Cuba VUlanova College. 

Pushkin, Benjamin Maryland Wltebsk Gymnasium. 

Reed, Joseph Corrington, Jr Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Ricb, William F North Carolina Columbia High School. 

Richards, Walter L Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Ribra, Manuel J., A.B Cuba Instltuto de Orlente. 

Schapiro, Abraham Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Schnuox, Harry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Smith, M. Duke Maryland Denton High School. 

Stahl. William Martin Connecticut Collegiate Prep. School. 

Stbin, Harry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Stephens, Charles M Pennsylvania Dr. R. W. Ramsay. 

Stewart, Emmet James Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Tidmarsh, Henry Walter South Carolina 

Timanus, George Loutrell Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Tolleson, Clarence C Arizona Wofford College. 

Vaccaro. Leopold Maryland Clark University. 

Van Poole. Carl M North Carolina Mt. Pleasant Coll. Inst. 

Vinson, Porter Paisley, B.S., A.M North Carolina Davidson College. 

Walsh, William S Rhode Island LaSalle Academy. 

Warner, Howard Hogb Maryland 

Whiteside, W. Carl South Carolina Dr. B. N. Miller. 

Wilkinson, Vernon Stevens Pennsylvania Western Maryland College. 

Williams, David Tressler Virginia Dr. Anderson. 

Wilson, Frank Minium Maryland Dr. J. Jones Wilson. 

Wilson, Frank W North Carolina Dr. C.O.H.Laughlnghouse. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Anderson, Franklin B *. Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Arnold, John Bruce Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Ashman, Jesse, LL.B Maryland 

Bennett, James Allan Virginia 

Berlin, Samuel Maryla?id 

Birely, Lewis A Maryland Dr. F. D. Harshman. 

Blackmer. Jocelyn William North Carolina Trinity High School. 

Braverman, Abraham Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Brotman, Robert H Maryland Dr. E. Deichmann. 

Buie, Louis A., B.A South Carolina University of S. C 

Byrnes, Hugh Edward Connecticut Phillips Exeter Academy. 

Chambliss, Peter Corbin Maryland Johns Hopkins Univ. 

Cohn, Alexander Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Cohn. Charles A Pennsylvania Dr. M. L. Cahn, 

Crook, Charles S Maryland Dr. G. G. Rusk. 

Diener, Louib Virginia Culpeper High School. 

Dimarco, Vincent Mississippi Dr. S. Dlmarco. 

D0R8EY, George H Maryland Dr. C. G. Myers. 

Egan, Michael Joseph, Jr Georgia Dr. Marion Thomas. 

Elrod, Luther C South Carolina Wofford College. 

Etzler, Dorsey Paul Maryland Frederick Co. High School 

Foard, Frederick T., Jr North Carolina University of N. C. 

Foxwell, Raymond Kennedy Maryland Charlotte Hall Academy. 

Fritz, Gustav A Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Gibbons, Richard William New Jersey 

Gilbert, Harry Jesse New Jersey 

Goldman, Harby Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Gordy, Lylb Leeland Maryland 

Hale, L. Fitzhugh Virginia 

Hamill, Hhnhy Byrne Maryland Hampden-Sldney College. 

Hayh, Mathhw Ewing West Virginia Dr. C. N. Wyant. 

32 



Name State Preceptor 

Hendrix, Nevins, Btford, A.B South Carolina Dr. M. Q. Hendrlx. 

Hill, Robert B., B.S., M.A North Carolina Davidson College. 

Jenkins, Ralph Hathaway Maryland Johns Hopkins University. 

Jenkins, William Hemson Virginia Richmond College. 

Johnson, Robert W South Carolina 

Johnson, William Robert South Carolina 

Krantz, Herman Warner Connecticut 

Laplanche, Ernest Maryland Milton Academy. 

Leiva, Carlos E Cuba Dr. J. M. Infante. 

Lewis, Le Rot South Carolina Presbyterian College. 

Lockridqe, Raymond B West Virginia 

Lowry, John A. B North Carolina Indian Normal College. 

McAnally, William F North Carolina University of N. C. 

McCabe, J. Levering North Carolina University of N. C. 

Me'ich, Wilson S Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Merkel, Henry Anton Maryland Dr. E. Deichmann. 

Michael, Marion Harlan Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Mitchell. Henry Stanley Maryland Dr. N. I. Broadwater. 

Mitchell, Roy W Delaware Millsboro High School. 

Moffett, Daniel Bruce, B. A Alabama Richmond College. 

Parlett, William Alvin Maryland Dr. J. T. Avery. 

Patrick, George R., Jr North Carolina.. Dr. L. N. Patrick 

Penabaz. Jose A., B.A Cuba 

Pinkerton, Frank Coulson Virginia 

Porro, Adalbert© Cesar Florida Tampa High School. 

Porter. Lyman R : Maryland 

de Quevedo, Alberto Garcia Porto Rico 

Rappeport, Jacob Max Maryland 

Raskin, Moses Georgia 

Rever, William B Maryland 

Robinson, John Daniel, A.B North Carolina Davidson College. 

Ross, George Perry Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Rush, Playford L Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Schreiber, Louis Waiter Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Shafer, Ralph Maryland 

Shannon, Samuel Dennison Maryland Baltimore City College. 

It-Sindler, Joseph Maryland 

Soderstrom, Gustav Albin, A.B Neiv Jersey Upsala College. 

Stern, Max E Maryland Columbia College. 

Stringer, John Thomas Virginia Dr. R. A. Rosser. 

Tonolla, Howard Maryland Collegiate Prep. School. 

Whittington, William Eugene North Carolina Baltimore Med. College. 

Williams, William Frederick Maryland Cumberland High School. 

Wilson, Bascom L North Carolina 

Woodland, John C, Phar.D Maryland Md. College of Phar. 

Wolfe, Humphrey D Maryland 

Zeller, Eugene Joshua Karl Maryland Baltimore City College. 

Zieqler, Mark V Maryland St. John's College. 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1911-1912. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 202 

School of Medicine 331 

Department of Law 180 

Dental Department 199 

Department of Pharmacy 106 

Training School for Nurses 80 

Total 1098 

33 



GRADUATES JUNE 1, 1912. 



Robert Ephraim Abell South Carolina. 

Reese Alexander Allgood.. .South Carolina. 

Robert Glenn Allison South Carolina. 

Angel Virgilio Aviles Ecuador, S. A. 

George Cullen Battle North Carolina. 

Grover Cleveland Beard North Carolina. 

Bernard Mark Berngartt Marijland. 

Harry Aloysius Bishop Dist. of Columbia. 

Robert Alexander Bonner Maryland. 

Sidney Eli Buchanan North Carolina. 

William Thomas Chipman Delaware. 

Charles Peter Clautice Maryland. 

Wilfred Rivers Claytor South Carolina. 

James Daniel Cochran North Carolina. 

Thomas Joseph Connors Connecticut. 

John Dade Darby Maryland. 

Russell Hardy Dean, Jr Florida. 

Harry Deibel Maryland. 

John Bernard Donovan Maine. 

James Archie Duggan Georgia. 

John William Ebert Virginia. 

Ernest William Frey Maryland. 

William Edwin Gallion, Jr Maryland. 

Dawson O. George Maryland. 

Abraham Goldstein New York. 

William Granville Haines Maryland. 

Judson E. Hair South Carolina. 

Edward H. J. Hennessey Connecticut. 

Milford Hinnant North Carolina 

James Edward Hubbard Maryland. 

Henderson Irwin North Carolina. 

Edward Sooy Johnson Maryland. 

John Kent Johnston Florida. 

Charles Loring Joslin Maryland. 

M. Randolph Kahn Maryland. 

Edwin Paul Kolb Maryland. 

Daniel Henry Lawler Connecticut. 

Simon Geilech Lenzer New York. 



Moses Louis Lichtenberg Maryland. 

Bertrand Allen Lillich Pennsylvania. 

Everett Alexander Livingston N. C 

Enrique Llmas Columbia, S. A. 

Edward Anderson Looper Georgia. 

Benjamin J. McGoogan North Carolina. 

Andres Martin G. de Per alt a Cuba. 

William Michel Maryland. 

Benjamin Newhouse Maryland. 

John Charles Norton Maryland. 

Roger Vinton Parlett Maryland. 

Robert Bruce Patrick South Carolina. 

Philip Pearlstein Texas. 

Charles Wm. Rauschenbach Maryland. 

Harry Herman Rich New Jersey. 

Joseph Rottenberg ; Maryland. 

Wilbur Moate Scott Georgia. 

Jay D. Sharp Indiana. 

Everett Alanson Sherrell... North Carolina. 

David Silberman Maryland. 

John Andrew Skladowsky Maryland. 

Clarke Jackson Stallworth Alabama. 

John Clinton Stansbury Maryland. 

Grover A. Stem Maryland. 

Thomas F. A. Stevens Maryland. 

Jesse Cunningham Stilley Pennsylvania . 

Edward Charles Straessley.. Pennsylvania. 

William C. Terry North Carolina. 

John Henry Trab and, Jr Maryland. 

Gerardo Vega y Thomas Cuba. 

Michael Vinci guerra New Jersey. 

Harold Homer Webb Virginia. 

Edwin V. Whitaker Louisiana. 

Hyman R. Wiener Pennsylvania. 

Robert Cleveland Williams A' . C. 

W. Howard Yeager Pennsylvania. 

Henry Zimmerman Massachusetts. 



PRIZEMEN. 

University Prize— Gold Medal Charles William Rauschenbach 



Certificates of Honor. 



Edwin Paul Kolb, 
Robert Ephraim Abell, 



William Granville Haines, 
Robert Alexander Bonner, 



William Michel. 



34 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Wm. J. Coleman, M.D. 
Medical Superintendent. 



F. R. Winslow, M.D. 
Robert E. Abell, M.D. 
Wm. E. Gallion, Jr., M.D. 
Edward A. Looper, M.D. 
Henderson Irwin, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Surgeons. 



Chas. W. Rauschenbach, M.D. 
R. A. Allgood, M.D. 
Wilbur M. Scott, M.D. 
Judson E. Hair, Jr., M.D. 

Assistant Resident Physicians. 

Wm. L. Byerly, M.D. 
L. K. Walker, M.D. 

Assistant Resident Gynecologists. 



M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D. 
Resident Pathologist. 



FACULTY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Attending Physicians. 
Prof. C. W. Mitchell, M.D. 



Prof. J. C. Hemmeter, M.D. 
Prof. E. Zueblix, M.D. 
Prof. J. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Prof. 



I. J. 



Prof. Harry Adler, M.D. 
Prof. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 
Prof. C. W. McElfresh, M.D. 
Prof. Gordon Wilson, M.D. 
Spear, M.D. 



Attending Surgeons. 



Prof. R. Winslow, M.D. 
Prof. T. A. Ashby, M.D. 
Prof. A. M. Shipley, M.D. 
Prof. J. M. Hundley, M.D. 



Prof. Hiram Woods, M.D. 
Prof. Frank Martin, M.D. 
Prof. St. Clair Spruill, M.D. 
Prof. John R. Winslow, M.D. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS FOR 1912-1913. 



S. A. Alexander, North Carolina. 
John T. Beavers, North Carolina. 
B. Karl Blalock, North Carolina. 
Earle G. Breeding, Maryland. 
J. M. Buch, Cuba. 
Humphrey Butler, Maryland. 
Leo M. Cavanaugh, Maryland. 
Vernon H. Condon, Maryland. 
Frederick L. Detrick, Virginia. 
Idalberto Fajardo, Cuba. 
Leonard Hays, Maryland. 
Howard E. Lecates, Maryland. 

The total number of patients treated 
1911-12 was 5495. 

35 



Elmer Newcomer, Maryland. 
Norbert C. Nitsche, Maryland. 
Walter A. Ostendorf, Maryland. 
Harry C. Raysor, South Carolina. 
Wm. Henry Scruggs, Jr., Georgia. 
Hamilton J. Slusher, Virginia. 
W. Houston Toulson, Maryland. 
Moody R. Troxler, North Carolina 
Grady B. Wells, South Carolina. 
Cleveland D. Whelchel, Georgia. 
Thomson B. W t oods, South Carolina. 



the Hospital during the year 



THE UNIVERSITY TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

Under the guidance of the Superintendent, the pupils of this School are In- 
structed in all that pertains to Scientific Nursing. Lectures are also delivered to 
them by the members of the Faculty of Physic, on Elementary Anatomy, Physi- 
ology, Materia Medica, Chemistry, Antiseptics and Hygiene, as well as upon Nurs- 
ing in special practice. The Nursing in the Hospital is thus conducted on the 
most approved plan, and its large material is invaluable to the pupils of the School. 
For circulars and information about the Training School, address, 
Mrs. Ethel P. Clarke, Superintendent of Nurses, 

Hospital of the University of Maryland, 
Baltimore, Md. 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
Prof. L. E. Neale, M. D., Director. 
L. H. Douglass, M.D. John D. Darby, M.D. Wm. Michel, M.D 

Resident Physicians. 

Synopsis of the Report of the Resident Physicians for the Year Ending May, i, 

1912. 

Number of Confinements in Hospital 462 

Number of Confinements in Out-door Department 946 

Total 1408 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class, 40 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Anatomy. — Piersol. 

Surgery. — Da Costa; Wyeth; Brewer; Lexer-Bevan; Binnie's; Opera- 
tive Surgery; Park. 

Chemistry. — Remsen; Witthaus; Holland; Simon. 

Obstetrics. — William's Obstetrics; Hirst, American Text-Book of Obstetrics. 

Principle and Practice of Medicine. — Anders; Osier; Edwards. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics. — Culbreth's Materia Medica; Wood's 
Therapeutics (1 vol.); Cushny; Hare. 

Physiology. — Halliburton; Hall; Howell; Brubaker; Tigerstedt; Hem- 
meter's Manual of Practical Physiology. 

Diseases of Women. — Ashby; Ashton; Montgomery; Penrose. 

Diseases of the Eye. — Fuchs, 1908 Edition; DeSchweinitz ; May. 

Diseases of the Ear. — Politzer (last edition); Deuch; Bezold. 

Diseases of the Throat and Nose. — Elementary, J J.Kyle; Gleason; Advanced. — 
Ballenger; B. Kyle; Coakley; Grunewald's Atlas. 

Orthopedic Surgery. — Taylor's Notes on Orthopedic Surgery. 

Pathology. — Delafield and Prudden; Stengel; Macfarland; Abbott's Bacte- 
riology; Histology — Ferguson; Embryology — McMurrich; Heisler. 

Medical Jurisprudence. — Chapman; Draper; Stewart. 

Hygiene. — Egbert; Harrington; Parke; Bergey. 

Diseases of Nervous System. — Starr; Church and Peterson; Gowers; Dana. 

Mental Diseases. — Kraepelin; Defendorf. 

Diseases of Children. — Holt. 

Disease of Skin. — Stelwagen; Duhring; Hyde. 

Medical Dictionary. — Dunglison (last edition); Duane; Gould (third edition); 
Dorland. 36 



Works on Special Subjects. — Greene's Medical Diagnosis; Cabot's Phy- 
sical Diagnosis; Hemmeter, Diseases of the Stomach; Da Costa on Diagno- 
sis; Sahli's Diagnosis; Anders and Barton's Diagnosis; Musser's Medical 
Diagnosis; Von Jacksch, Clinical Diagnosis; Tyson, Practical Examination 
of Urine; Ogden, Clinical Examination of Urine; Fractures, Scudder; Diseases 
of the Rectum, Gant; Park's History of Medicine. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 
The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 
The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an orator 
will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old class- 
mates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates who 
have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 
The following are the officers for the current year: 
President — C. R. Winterson, M.D. 
First Vice-President— Wm. E. Wiegand, M.D. 
Second Vice-President — H. L. Naylor, M.D. 
Third Vice-President— W. S. Maxwell, M.D. 
Recording Secretary — Nathan Winslow, M.D. 
Asst. Recording Secretary — J. Chas. Macgill, M.D. 
Corresponding Secretary — John I. Pennington, M.D. 
Treasurer — John Houff, M.D. 

Executive Committee — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D., B. Merrill Hopkln- 
son, M.D., G. A. Fleming, M.D., V. L. Norwood, M.D., H. C. Houck, 
M.D. 
Application for membership should be accompanied with Initiation Fee o/$1.00 
and mailed to the Corresponding Secretary or Treasurer. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Porter P. Vinson, President. 

This Association since its establishment, seventeen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

The Association now occupies comfortable rooms in one of the buildings of the 
University. 

Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout the 
College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character and 
morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session to wel- 
come new students to the University, and will also be glad to render assistance in 

37 



the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding houses, etc., and to extend any 
other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges of the Association, and to address the officer named below, 
who will be glad to furnish any information desired regarding the Association 
and its work, and to render any assistance in his power, and upon arriving in 
the city are requested to make themselves known as soon as possible. 

Porter P. Vinson, President. 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 

ENDOWMENT. 

Through the instrumentality of the Alumni Association, an important move- 
ment in the direction of securing a permanent endowment for the School of Medi- 
cine of the University has lately been inaugurated. 

The following gentlemen constitute the present Board of Trustees of this fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridqe, LL.D. Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. 
Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 

Harry Adler, M.D. B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Eugene F. Cordell, M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Charles Markell, Esq. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, its legal title 
being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the University of Maryland," 
and is independent and self-perpetuating, filling its own vacancies. Its powers 
are limited to the expenditure of the interest derived from the fund, which is to 
be applied in the discretion of the Board for the Benefit of the School. 

Attention is invited to the "Charles Frick Research Fund," lately established 
by Messrs. Reverdy Johnson and Wm. F. Frick, for original research. 

Contributions, bequests or donations to this fund are solicited from the Alumni 
and friends of the school. These contributions may be made to the general fund, 
or for some special object, as building, research, library, hospital, publication, 
laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. 

Checks should be made payable to Charles Markell, Treasurer, 1137 Cal- 
vert Building, Baltimore. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 
I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the bene- 
fit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 

University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State 

of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 
38 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 

FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

B. Vernon Cecil, M.A., Sc.D., Vice-President, (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of 

Chemistry and Physics. 
John B. White, M.A., (Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A., (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor 

of Mathematics. 

C. W. Stryker, M.A., (Graduate of Union College, New York), Professor of History and Political 

Economy. 

John Brockwat Rippere, B.A., (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Professor of Latin. 

Bartgi8 McGlone, Ph.D., (Graduate of Johns Hopkins University), Professor of Biology. 

Edward Hinman Sirich, B.A., (Graduate of Johns Hopkins University), Professor of French and 
German. 

Ronald E. Fisher, 14th Cavalry, U. S. A., (Lieutenant of the United States Army), Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics, and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 

Edwin Stanley Armstrong, M.A., (Graduate of University of Pennsylvania, Professor of Eng- 
lish. 

Charles G. Eidson, B.S., E.E., (Graduate of University of Tennessee), Professor of MechaDlcal 
Engineering. 

A. W. Woodcock, Jr., M.A., (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Henry F. Sturdy, B.A., (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
Thomas L. Gladden, Superintendent of the Preparatory School, and Instructor In English and Latin. 
Roscoe E. Grove, B.A., (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant in Preparatory School, and 

Instructor in Gymnastics. 

For information and Annual Catalogue, address The President of St. John's College, Annapolis, 
Md. 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The regular Winter Session begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the following 
May. 
The requirements for admission are the same as in all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Principles of Dental Science and Dental 

Prosthesis. 
R. Dorsey Coale, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 

B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Prof essor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 
Eldridge Baskin, M.D., D.D.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Dentistry and Orthodontia. 

J. S. Geiser, D.D.S., Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis and Operative and Prosthetic Technics. 

J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 

Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Instructor of Histology and Dental Anatomy. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Howard J. Maldeis, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 

E. Frank Kelly, Ph.G., Director of Chemical Laboratory. 

Herbert F. Gorgas, D.D.S., Director of Dental Infirmary. 

Matriculation and Tuition Fees, per Session, $150.00. 

For information and annual catalogue, address T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, Baltimore, 
Md. 

39 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION. 
THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Judge Henby D. Hablan, Constitutional Law and Domestic Relations. 
Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations, Pleading, Practice and Legal Ethics. 
Judge Henby Stockbridge, International Law, Public and Private ; Conflict of Laws, Executors and 

Administrators. 
Edgar A. Pob, Esq., Bills and Notes, Sales, Suretyship, Personal Property and Bailments. 
W. Calvin Chestnut, Esq., Criminal Law and Insurance. 
Judge Jamep P. Gobteb, Juridical Equity, Evidence and Damages. 
Judge John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Bankruptcy, 

Patents, Trade-marks, Copyrights and Unfair Competition. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., The Law of Real Property. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Title to Real Property, Conveyancing and Dnector of the Moot Court. 
Albert C. Ritchie, Esq., Commercial Law, Shipping and Elementary Law. 
Chables J. Bonaparte, Esq., The Law of Contracts. 
Judge Carroll T. Bond, Executors and Administrators. 
Samuel Want, Esq., Director of Library and Students* Adviser. 

For catalogue containing full Information, Address, 
Henry D. Hablan. Dean of Law Faculty 

1061 Calvert Building, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL SESSION MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY. 

FACULTY. 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Chables Caspabi, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M.R. Culbbeth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henby P. Htnson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 



ADJUNCT FACULTY. 

H. A. B. Dunning, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Jab. W. Westcott, Ph.G.. Associate Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacognosy. 

Chas. C.Plttt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Vegetable Histology. 

Henby E. Wich, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

J. Cablton Wolf, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Dispensing. 

For Catalogue containing full Information, address Charles Casparl, Jr., Dean of the Maryland 
College of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 

40 



r 





gy i »w 











^i£/ 



University of Maryland 



ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTH 
ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF THE 

School of Medicine 



N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SESSION 1913-1914 



BALTTMORE 
WILLIAMS & WILKIN'S COMPANT 

lal3 




MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL 






The School of Medicine of 

the University of 

Maryland 

1913 



CALENDAR 



One Hundred and Seventh Annual Session. 

1913. 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University Hospital. 
October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

October 13. — Re-examination of Deficient Students and Examina- 
tion for Advanced Standing. 
November 27. — Thanksgiving Day, Holiday. 
December 23. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 



CHRISTMAS RECESS. 
1914. 

January 5. — Lectures resumed. 9 a.m. 
May 11. — Final Examinations begin. 

June 1 (about). — Commencement, Annual Meeting of Alumni Asso- 
ciation. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor, or Master of Arts or Sciences. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. This school 
was established in Baltimore, Md., in 1807, and offers a high-grade 
course in medicine, extending over a period of four years, and leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The Department of Dentistry was founded in 1882, and 
is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral part of the 
School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1840 as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated with the School 
of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers two years, and leads 
to the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. 

3 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost. 
R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D. LL.D. Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. 
Thomas A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D. Philemon H. Tuck, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D.. D.C.L. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Edgar A. Poe, Esq. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Hon. John C. Rose Joseph C. France, Esq. 

D. M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G., M.D. Timothy A. Heatwole,M.D.,D.D.S. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D. Hon. Robert Moss, 
Charles C^spari, Jr., Phar.D. David Streett, A.M., M.D. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 
THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 
President of St John's College. 

PROFESSORS B. V. CECIL, A.M., Sc.D., and 

PHILEMON H. TUCK, A.M., LL.D. 

For St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., and 
RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

For School of Medicine. 

PROFESSORS HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., and 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D. 

For School of Law. 

PROFESSOR T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 

For School of Dentistry. 

PROFESSOR CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 
For School of Pharmacy. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FOUNDED 1807 



THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M. D. 
RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
L. E. NEALE, M.D., LL.D. 
THOMAS A. ASHBY, M.D., LL.D. 
J. HOLMES SMITH, M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 
ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D. 
DAVID STREETT, A.M., M.D. 
SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 
RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 
5 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Medicine. 

R. Dorset Co ale, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, 

Dean of the Faculty. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical 

Medicine. 
Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Diseases of Women. 
J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Clinical Medicine. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Surgical Pa- 
thology. 
David Streett, A.M., M.D., Professor of Practice of Medicine. 
Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Practice of Surgery. 
Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
Jose L. Hirsh, B.A.. M.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and 

Visiting Pathologist to the University Hospital. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 
Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 
Eugene F. Cordell, A.M., M.D., Professor of the History of Medicine and 

Librarian. 
Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Principles of Medicine. 
Harry Adler, B.A., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas C. Gilchr st, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. C. Pole, M.D., Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 
J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

and Clinical Medicine. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Tilgham B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Joseph T. Smith, M.L}., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene. 

6 



St. Clair Spruill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

R. Tdns'tall Taylor, M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, B.A., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Jas. A. Nydegger, M.A., M.D., Sc.D., Surg. U. S. P. H. Service, Professor of 
Tropical Medicine. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Lecturer on Clin- 
ical Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, M.A., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Prof essor of Diseases of the Throat and 
Nose. 

T. L. Patterson, M.A., Associate Professor of Biology and Physiology. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

G. C. Lockard, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Pedi- 
atrics. 

E. L. Whitney, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry, Phar- 
macology and Clinical Pathology. 

E. B. Freeman, S.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

William Caspari, Jr., Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Materia Medica. 

J. W. Cole, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. Clement Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. E. Peterman, M.D., Associate in Ophtalmology and Otology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology and Assistant Gastro- 
Enterologist to the University Hospital. 

Isaac M. Macks, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate in Proctology. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Associate in Clinical Surgery. 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine and Pedi- 
atrics. 

John Evans, M.D., Associate in Anatomy. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 



H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate in Operative Surgery. 

J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate in Anatomy. 

Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Associate in Histology and Embryology. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

W. I. Messick, M.D., Lecturer on Clinical Medicine. 

Frank W. Keating, M.D., Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics. 

H. C. Hyde, M.D., Lecturer on Pediatrics. 

H. W. Stoner, M.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology. 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D., Lecturer on Psychiatry. 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Lecturer on Osteology. 

G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Demonstrator of Materia Medica. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Demonstrator of Physiology. 

W. F. Sowers, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology and Embryology. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

John A. Tomkins, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Minor Surgery and Bandaging. 

J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

J. F. O'Mara, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. W. Jones, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Stubbs. M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

F. S. Lynn, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

F. J. Kirby, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

Henry Chandlee, M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

W. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Fred Rankin, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. M. Delevett, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

C. Irwin Hill, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Psychiatry. 

Milton P. Hill, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

John G. Jeffers, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Christian Deetjen, M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 

A. J. Underhill. M.D., Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 
Leo Karlinsky, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 
H. W. Brent, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

8 



W. G. Queen, M.D., Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Assistant Demonstrator of Physiology. 

H. U. Todd, M.D,, Assistant in Clinical Pathology. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Assistant in Histology and Embryology. 

F. W. Hoblemann, M.D , Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. W. Sanderson, M.D., Assistant in Medical Topography. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Pathology and Pharmacology. 

S. A. Bain, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

George Murgatroyd, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Horace W. Nicholson, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology 

H. J. Walton, M.D., Assistant in Radiography. 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

H. W. Nicholson, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

George E. Bennett, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A. L. Fehsenpeld. M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Surgeons. 

Prop. Randolph Winslow Prop. Frank Martin 

Prop. Arthur M. Shipley Prof. J. D. Blake 

Prop. Ridgelt B. Warfield Prof. St. Glair Spruill 

Clin. Prof. Nathan Winslow 

Attending Physicians. 
Prof. Charles W. Mitchell Prop. Harry Adler 

Prop. John C. Hemmeter Prof. Charles O'Donovan 

Prof. David Streett Prof. J. M. Craighill 

Prof. Ernest Zueblin Prop. Jos. E. Gichner 

Prof. Gordon Wilson Prof. Charles W. McElfresh 

Attending Gynecologists. 

Prof. Thomas A. Ashby Prof. W. B. Perry 

Prof. J. Mason Hundley 

Attending Obstetricians. 
Prof. L. E. Neale Prof. J. M. H. Rowland 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 
Prof. Hiram Woods Prof. J. Frank Crouch 

Attending Laryngologists. 

Prof. Samuel K. Merrick Prof. John R. Winslow 

Clin. Prof. R. H. Johnson 

Attending Proctologist. 
Prof. G. Milton Linthicum. 

Attending Orthopedist. 
Prof. R. Tunstall Taylor. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Prof. Irving J. Spear. 

Attending Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 
Prof. Gideon Timberlake Clin. Prof. Page Edmunds 

Attending Pathologists. 
Prof. Jose L. Hirsh Associate, H. J. Maldeis 

Attending Radiologists. 
Henry Chandlee, M.D. H. J. Walton, M.D. 

10 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
William J. Coleman, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons. 

C. W. Rauschenbach, M.D. H. A. Codington, M.D. 

.Wilbur M. Scott, M.D. Charles R. Edwards, M.D. 

Robert E. Abbll. M.D. Elmer Newcomer, M.D. 

Resident Physicians. 

M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D. Leonard Hays, M.D. 

W. F. Gemmill, M.D. C. D. Whelchel, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologists. 
S. Miller, M.D. Grover A. Stem, M.D. 

Maternity Department. 
H. M. Freeman, M.D., Chief Resident Obstetrician. 

Resident Obstetricians. 
T. B. Woods, M.D. Edgar E. Travers, M.D. 

Resident Pathologist. 
N. H. Toulson, M.D. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS FOR 1913-1914. 



Charles W. Armstrong North Carolina 

Charles C. Ayers Maryland 

Antonio Balart Cuba 

Lowrie W. Blake South Carolina 

Clark S. Bog art Pennsylvania 

Theron R. Bradley New York 

William D. R. Brandon North Carolina 

Horace W. Byers North Carolina 

John C. Caldwell South Carolina 

Hugh E. Clark Virginia 

Alexander S. Coleman Georgia 

LeCompte Cook Maryland 

George B. Crist Maryland 

Theodore McC. Davis South Carolina 

Walter L. Denny, Jr Maryland 

John S. Fenry Maryland 

Bruce H. Guistwhite Pennsylvania 

Charles C. Habliston, Phar.D Maryland 

Cecil S. Hassell North Carolina 

Clair C. Henderson North Carolina 

Claud B. Hicks, A.B North Carolina 



Clarence C. Hoke, A.B South Carolina 

Raymond L. Johnson Florida 

James W. Katzenberger, A.B Maryland 

Louis M. Limbaugh Florida 

Samuel G. Love South Carolina 

John F. Lutz Maryland 

George B. Lynch North Carolina 

Charles L. Magruder Maryland 

Challice H. Metcalfe Maryland 

Alfred Mordecai North Carolina 

Joseph F. Munnerlyn, A.B... South Carolina 

Richard B. Norment, Jr Maryland 

Walter L. Richards Maryland 

M. Duke Smith Maryland 

William M. Stahl Connecticut 

Harry Stein Maryland 

George L. Timanus Maryland 

Porter P. Vinson, B.S., A.M.. .South Carolina 

Jesse R. Wanner Maryland 

Frank M. Wilson Maryland 

Frank W. Wilson North Carolina 



The total number of patients treated in the Hospital during the year 1912-13 
was 6628. 



11 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF. 
Rev. John Helps Bickford, D.D.. Superintendent. 

Visiting Staff. 

Surgeons. 



Prof. Randolph Winslow 
Prof. Arthur M. Shipley 
Prof. Ridgely B. Warfield 



Prof. Frank Martin 

Prof. John D. Blake 

Prof. St. Clair Spruill 



Nathan Winslow, M.D. 
J. C. Lumpkin, M.D. 



Associates. 

A. G. Barrett, M.D. 
Physicians. 



Prof. Charles W. Mitchell 
Prof. John C. Hemmeter 
Prof. David Streett 
Prof. Ernest Zueblin 
Prof. Gordon Wilson 



H. C. Blake, M.D. 
J. Frank Kirby, M.D. 



Prof. Harry Adler 

Prof. A. C. Pole 

Prof. Charles O'Donovan 

Prof. J. M. Craighill 

Prof. Jos. E. Gichnbr 



Prof. Chas. W. McElfresh 
Associates. 



Thos. W. Keown, A.B., M.D. 

J. SOMERVILLE FlSCHER, A.B., M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D 



E. B. Freeman, S.B., M.D. 
Wm. T. Riley, M.D. 



Neurologist. 
Prof. Charles G. Hill. 



J. Clement Clark, M.D. 



Prof. S. K. Merrick 



Associates. 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D. 
Larynqologists. 



J. Percy Wade, M.D. 



Prof. John R. Winslow 



Prof. L. E. Neale 



Obstetricians. 



Prof. J. M. H. Rowland 



Gynecologists. 



Prof. Thomas A. Ashby 



Prof. W. B. Perry 



Pbof. J. Mason Hundley 
12 



Associates. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D. S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists. 
Prop. Hiram Woods Prof. J. Frank Crouch 

Associates. 
H. E. Peterman, M.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
Prop. G. Milton Linthicum. 

Associate. 
John G. Jefpers, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D. 

Urologists. 
Prof. Gideon Timberlake W. B. Wolf, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Radiologist. 
Christian Deetjen, M.D. 

Chief of House Staff. 
L. K. Walker, M.D. 

Resident Staff. 

I. M. Zimmerman, M.D. B. D. Smith, M.D. 

G. A. Sillman, M.D. E. G. Marr, M.D. 

H. W. Gibbs, M.D. R. E. Thomas, M.D. 



13 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, B.A., M.D., Surgeon^in-Chief. 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

J. Edward Hubbard, M.D., Assistant Surgeon. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Dispensary Surgeon. 

Miss Mary E. Thomas, R.N., Head Nurse. 

Miss Ada B. Mosby, Principal of School. 

Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, M.D. 

Pediatrist. 
Richard A. Urquhart, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atkinson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 

Frank Martin, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologist. 

John R. Winslow, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologist. 

Richard H. Johnson, M.D. 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 

William Tarum, M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

L. McLane Tiffany, M.D. W. S. Halbted. M.D. 

Randolph Winslow, M.D. J. M. T. Finney M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, M.D. Charles W. Mitchell, M.D. 

William S. Thayer, M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 

Hiram Woods, M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 

John N. Mackenzie, M.D. 

14 



STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITALS AT BAYVIEW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

Milton C. Winternitz, A.B., M.D., Pathologist. 

Consulting Staff. 

Ophthalmologist. 
James J. Mills, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

Otologist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 
Edward H. Richardson, M.D. Hugh W. Brent, M.D. 

Urologists. 
Gideon M. Timberlake, M.D. John T. Geraghty, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. A. Strobel, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 



16 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. P. F. Martin, M.D. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

Eugene H. Hayward, M.D. G. C. Lockard, M.D. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank Martin, M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

R. B. Warfield, M.D. 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Pathologists. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. G. C. Lockard, M.D- 

H. R. Spencer, M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
H. W. Pinto. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

Prof. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Obstetrician. 

Associates. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar. M.D. E. A. Smith, M.D. 

J. M. Delevett, M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
D. L. Farber, M.D. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 
John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., J. F. O'Mara, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor 

of Medicine. 
S. R. Clark, M.D., L. H. Douglass, M.D., Assistant Chiefs of Clinic. 
Wm. M. Byerly, M.D., Wm. Michel, M.D., W. G. Clopton, M.D., F. K. 

Nksholls, M.D., E. H. Perkins, M.D., Assistants. 

16 



John G. Jay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery. 
R. P. Bat, M.D., Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Assistant Chiefs of Clinic. 
Fred Rankin, M.D., E. L. Perkins, M.D., Thos. L. Phillips, M.D., Assist- 
ants. 

G. C. Lockard, M.D., H. C. Hyde, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of 

Pediatrics. 
R. C. Harley, M.D., C. L. Schmidt. M.D., L. C. Douglas, M.D., Wm. Michel, 

M.D., Assistants. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., W. K. White, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willse, 
M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 

E. A. Looper, M.D., W. G. Queen, M.D., Assistants. 

J. R. Abercrombie, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Stomach. 
Robert A. Warner, M.D., J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Assistants. 

R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the 

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
Walter S. Niblett, M.D., Assistant. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito -Urinary Diseases. 

F. W. Hoblemann, M.D., A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic. 

J. H. Von Dreele, M.D., Wm. L. Byerly, M.D., H. A. Rutledge, M.D., 
Assistants. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

George M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

A. L. Fehsenpeld, M.D., Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Assistants. 

J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Clinic. 

Mr. A. D. Johnson, Secretary to the Dean and Superintendent of College Build- 
ings 



17 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Robert L. Blake, M.D., Dispensary Chief. 

Medicine. 
E. B. Freeman, M.D. 

Surgery. 
E. H. Hutchins, M.D. 

Nose, Throat and Chest. 
Geo. W. Murgatroyd, M.D. H. M. Nicholson, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 
J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

Dermatology. 
Edgar R. Strobel, M.D. Samuel A. Bain, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

Sidney H. Streett, M.D. J. M. Fenton, M.D. 

Eugene Hayward, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Sidney M. Cone, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear. 
Clybe A. Clapp, M.D. R. D. West, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. F. W. Hobleman, M.D. 

Proctology. 
John G. Jeffers, M.D. 



18 



MATRICULATES FOR 1912-1913. 



POST GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Name State 

Lang W. Anderson South Carolina 

C. S. Bates, M.D West Virginia 

Nathan B. Bordensky, M.D Maryland 

Thos. Morris Chaney, M.D Maryland 

Joseph Hamilton Crampton, M.D Washington 

Emilio Cumpi ano Lucari Porto Rico 

Charles Singleton Dodd, B.S., M.D Virginia 

Frank O. Foard North Carolina 

John Bradford Grigg, M.D North Carolina 

J. Knox Insley, M.D Maryland 

Samuel W. Meech Maryland 

James Anderson Mitchell North Carolina 

James B. Parramore, M.D Florida 

Albert Luther Sibrel, M.D Virginia 

Eladio Thaureaux Cuba 

S. Wallenstein, M.D Maryland 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Alexander, Samuel Allen North Carolina 

Anderson, John, Jr New Jersey 

Bean, Philip Jenifer Maryland 

Blalock, B. Karl , North Carolina 

Breeding, Earlb Griffith, B.A Maryland 

Buch, J. M m A.B Cuba 

Butler, Humphrey Brazil, S. A . 

Callahan, Francis Fowler Maryland 

Cavanaugh, Leo M Maryland 

Cobb, Ross B Pennsylvania 

Crumrine, Leslie Bane Pennsylvania 

Craven, Franklin Clyde North Carolina 

Detrick, Frederick Louis Virginia 

Devine, Frederick R Rhode Island 

Disbrow, George Ward New Jersey 

Di Stefano, Dominick Maryland 

Edwards, Charles Reid Maryland 

Edwards, Vertie Edward North Carolina 

English, Ernest Lafayette North Carolina 

Fajardo, Idalberto H Cuba 

Gavlas, Frank E Pennsylvania 

Gemmill, W. F. Pennsylvania 

Goldsmith, Harry. Maryland 

Gould, Nathaniel Jay Virginia 

Graves, Jesse C Arkansas 

Hays, Leonard Maryland 

Haywobth, Claudius Abijah North Carolina 

19 



Name State 

Heath, Jacob Mott, Jr New York 

Heid, Edward P Pennsylvania 

Hemphill, Clyde Hoke North Carolina 

Holmes, Everett James Maine 

Judd, Clarence Wriglet ,. Pennsylvania 

Lebret, Gerard Henry New Jersey 

Lecates, Howard E Maryland 

Levin, Herman Harry Connecticut 

McDaniel, Frederick Leonard Alabama 

McDuffie, Charles George , Maryland 

Martin, William Tillman South Carolina 

Murphy, Franklin Dashiell New Jersey 

Neistadt, S. C Maryland 

Newcomer, Elmer Maryland 

Nitsch, Norbert Charles, A.B Maryland 

Ostendorf, Walter A , Maryland 

Pelusio, August N New Jersey 

Peters, Charles M., D.D.S New Jersey 

Perez, Hernan M., A.B Cuba 

Poibal, John Wilson, Jr Maryland 

Pratt, Thomas Ruffin, Jr North Carolina 

Raysor, Harry C South Carolina 

Schott, Edward H Connecticut 

Scruggs, William Henry, Jr Georgia 

Sellers, Robert R Ohio 

Shuler, G. Clyde Virginia 

Sirak, William W Pennsylvania 

Slusher, Hamilton J Virginia 

Smith, Manly Coke South Carolina 

Sparck, Joseph Maryland 

Stoneham, H. Graham Virginia 

Toulson, W. Houston, A.B Maryland 

Travers, Edgar E Maryland 

Troxler, Moody R North Carolina 

Tullidge, E. Kilbourne .Pennsylvania 

Wilson, Oscar Britton South Carolina 

Wells, Grady Brice South Carolina 

Whelchel, Cleveland Davis Georgia 

Woods, Thomson Butler South Carolina 

Wrightson, William O South Carolina 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Armstrong, Charles Wallace North Carolina 

Ayres, Charles C , Maryland 

Balart, Antonio Cuba 

Barber, Yates M Virginia 

Beavers, John T North Carolina 

Bishop, George William, A.B Maryland 

Blake, Lowrie Wilson South Carolina 

Bogart, C. S Pennsylvania 

Bradley, T. R., Ph.G New York 

Brandon, Wm. D. R North Carolina 

Bridgers, Harvey C North Carolina 

Brogden, James Chester, A.B South Carolina 

Brotman, Morton W New Jersey 

Byers, Horace Wellington North Carolina 

Caldwell, John C South Carolina 

Casler, Frank G West Virginia 



20 



Name State 

Clark, Hatnsworth D Florida 

Clark, Hugh E Virginia 

Clinton, Roland S North Carolina 

Coleman, A. S Georgia 

Condon, Vernon Herbert Maryland 

Cook, LeCompte Maryland 

Councill, Wilford A. Hall Maryland 

Cremin, Lawrence Dennis New York 

Crist, George Bruce Maryland 

Davis, Theodore McCann South Carolina 

Denny, Walter L Maryland 

Dodson, James Furman South Carolina 

Dovell, Chauncet Elmo Virginia 

Echeverria, Jose R Cuba 

Ellis, Joseph J Maryland 

English, John Mathews Francis Rhode Island 

Esslinger, Richard I., Phar.D Maryland 

Fenbt, John Smith Maryland 

Flickinger, William Pennsylvania 

Floyd, F. F North Carolina 

Grant, Harry C North Carolina 

Guistwhite, Bruce Hetrick Pennsylvania 

Habliston, Charles Carroll, Phar.D Maryland 

Hassell, Cecil S North Carolina 

Henderson, Clair Crouse North Carolina 

Hicks, Claud B., A.B North Carolina 

Hoke, Clarence C, A.B., A.M Maryland 

Holstein, Aaron Louis New Jersey 

Horger, Eugene Leroy, A.B South Carolina 

Johnson, Raymond Lovejoy, Ph.G Florida 

Katzenberger, James Wesley, A.B Missouri 

Levin, Morris Benjamin Maryland 

Limbaugh, Louie Mixson Florida 

Lipnick, J. Alexander Maryland 

Love, Samuel Glenn South Carolina 

Lutz, John Francis, A.B Maryland 

Lynch, George Bruce North Carolina 

McFadden Albert David Alabama 

McKinney, Harold Napoleon North Carolina 

Magruder, Charles L Maryland 

Metcalfe, Challice Hagdon Maryland 

Mordecai, Alfred North Carolina 

Munnerlyn, Joseph Francis, A.B South Carolina 

Nance, Fuller, Ph.G Maryland 

Norment, Richard Baxter, Jr Maryland 

Ostro, Marcus Delaware 

Portuondo, Albert L Cuba 

Pushkin, Benjamin Maryland 

Ray, Hickman North Carolina 

Rice, William Frederick North Carolina 

Richards, Walter L Maryland 

Sarinas, Faustino, B.A Philippine Islands 

Schapiro, Abraham Pennsylvania 

Schnuck, Harry Maryland 

Smith, Marcus Duke Maryland 

Spoore, Compton New York 

Stahl, William Martin Connecticut 

Stapleton, W. Pierce New Jersey 

Stein, Harry Maryland 

Stephens, Charles M Pennsylvania 

21 



Name State 

Stewart, Emmet James Maryland 

Timanus, George Loutrell Maryland 

Tolleson, Clarence C South Carolina 

Van Poole, Carl M North Carolina 

Vinson, Porter Paisley, B.S., A.M North Carolina 

Walsh, William S Rhode Island 

Wanner, Jesse R Maryland 

Warner, Howard Hoqe Maryland 

Warner, Theodore, Jr Maryland 

Whiteside, W. Carl South Carolina 

Wilikinson, Vernon Stevens Pennsylvania 

Williams, David T Virginia 

Williams, Lester L North Carolina 

Wilson, Frank M Maryland 

Wilson, Frank W North Carolina 

de Yoanna, Alfred Aurelius New York 

de Yoanna, Saverio Aurelio New York 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Anderson, Franklin B Maryland 

Arnold, J. Bruce Maryland 

Benard, Alberto, A.B Nicaragua 

Bennett, J. A Virginia 

Berlin, Samuel Maryland 

Birelt, Lewis Adam Maryland 

Blackmer, Joceltn William North Carolina 

Braverman, Abraham Maryland 

Buie, Louis Arthur, B.A South Carolina 

Cohn, Charles A Pennsylvania 

Crook, Charles S Maryland 

Diener, Louis Virginia 

Demarco, Vincent Mississippi 

Dorset, George Hamilton Maryland 

Ebt, John Ctril Maryland 

Egan, Michael Joseph, Jr Georgia 

Etzler, Dorsey Paul Maryland 

Foard, Frederick T., Jr North Carolina 

Fritz, Gustave A Maryland 

Gilbert, Harry Jesse New Jersey 

Goldman, Harry Maryland 

Gordy, Lyle Leland Maryland 

Hendrix, Nevins Byford, A.B., A.M South Carolina 

Hill, Robert B., B.S., M.A North Carolina 

Horn, John W., Jr Pennsylvania 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland 

Jenkins, William Herndon Virginia 

Johnson, Robert W South Carolina 

Johnson, William Robert South Carolina 

Justice, J. I West Virginia 

Kean, Thomas S. f Jr Maryland 

Khuri, Assad A Syria 

Krantz, Herman Warner Connecticut 

Laplanche, Ernest R Maryland 

Lewis, LeRoy South Carolina 

Long, Miles Thomson North Carolina 

Lowry, John, A.B North Carolina 

McCabe, J. Levering North Carolina 

Mellor, Royal B Maryland 

Mebkbi* Henry Anton Maryland 

22 



^~VO 



Name Htaiu 

Moffbtt, Daniel Bbuce, B.A Alabama 

Patrick, George Riddle North Carolina 

Penab az, Fernando Cuba 

Penabaz, Jose A. Fernandez, A.B \. . Cuba 

Pinkerton, Frank Coulson Virginia 

Porter, Lyman R Maryland 

De Quevedo, Alberto Garcia Porto Rico 

Radlow, James B New York 

Raskin, Moses Georgia 

Rice, Geo. W. Mainland 

Robinson, John Daniel, A.B North Carolina 

Ross, George Perry Maryland 

Rush, P. L Maryland 

Schreiber, Louis Walter Maryland 

^^JScimeca, Salvatore New York_ 

Shafer, Ralph A Maryland 

Shannon, Samuel Dennison Maryland 

Sloan, William Henrt North Carolina 

Stern, Max E New York 

Stringer, John Thomas Virginia 

Tidmarsh, Henry Walter South Carolina 

Tonolla, E. Howard Maryland 

Williams, William Frederick, Jr Maryland 

Wilson, Bascom L North Carolina 

Woodland, John C., Phar.D Maryland 

Zeller, Eugene Joshua Karl Maryland 

Ziegler, Mark Victor, A.B Maryland 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Abnest, Richard Turberville Virginia 

Baldwin, Anton, Jr Maryland 

Beam, Allen Wroth, Jr Maryland 

Bennett, Perctval Robert North Carolina 

Benson, Edward H Maryland 

Bickley, William Ernest, A.B South Carolin i 

Bishop, Everett Lassiter Georgia 

Bowden, George Aban Maryland 

Brumbaugh, Benjamin Bruce, Phar.D Maryland 

Burton, Charles Hammon Maryland 

Carbo, Pablo Alegre Cuba 

Catlin, William G Maryland 

Chandler, James Jennings, A.B South Carolina 

Cudd, James Eric, A.B South Carolina 

Davidson, William Brown Rhode Island 

Day, Samuel Thomas, Jr New Jermy 

Evans, John E., A.B Somh Carolina 

Feingloss, Israel Maryland 

Ferry, Bernard J Pennsylvania 

Folk, Robert Hamilton, A.B South Carolina 

Grant, David Swain North Carolina 

Gbowt, Bowers Hewitt Louisiana 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Jr Florida 

Gwynn, Humphrey Wilson Florida 

Hammer, Howell I. Ph.G Maryland 

Hawk, Albert Gatther North Carolina 

Hennessy, Jay Tyrrell New York 

Hutton, Daniel C North Carolina 

Jacobson, Bernard Samuel Maryland 

Jenkins, Ralph Hathaway Maryland 

23 



Name State 

Kennard, Hahold Claire Maryland 

King, Merle William, A.B New York 

Lazenby, Allen Deming Maryland 

Leiva, Carlos E Cuba 

Lockridge, Raymond West Virginia 

Long, Clark Samuel Pennsylvania 

McIntyre, Charles Frederick North Carolina 

Marino, Frank Christian Maryland 

Mason, Frank Ebaugh Maryland 

Michael, Marion Harlan Maryland 

Mitchell, Edward Kellers South Carolina 

Mitchell, Henry Stanley Maryland 

Mitchell, James Alfred Maryland 

Mitchell, R. W Delaware 

Nicklas, John Michael , Maryland 

O'Brien, J. Gerald Maryland 

Payaval, Juan L., A.B Philippine Islands 

Power, Maurice J Massachusetts 

Rappeport, Jacob Max Maryland 

Reed, Joseph Corrington, Jr Maryland 

Reier, Adam William Maryland 

Reifschneider, Charles Adam Maryland 

Rever, William B Maryland 

Rigby, Cecil, B.S I South Carolina 

Roberts, Joseph John Connecticut 

Rogers, Herbert W Virginia 

Santos, Angel Maria, Lit.B Cuba 

Satterfibld, Claude M Maryland 

Short, Noah West Virginia 

_V- Sindler, Joseph Maryland 

Stein, Harry Milton New Jersey 

Thomas, Edward Philip Maryland 

Toula, Jaroslav Jerry, Phar.D Maryland 

Voss, Norwood W., A.B Maryland 

Whittle, William Oscar Virginia 

Wilkinson, George R., B.S South Carolina 

Yaffe, Benjamin Meyer Maryland 



24 



GRADUATES MAY 31, 1913. 



Samuel Allen Alexander North Carolina 

Philip Jenifer Bean Maryland 

Burman Karl Blalock North Carolina 

Earle Griffith Breeding Maryland 

Jesus Maria Buch Portuondo Cuba 

Humphrey William Butler Brazil 

Francis Fowler Callahan Maryland 

Leo Martin Cayanaugh Maryland 

Ross B. Cobb Pennsylvania 

Franklin Clyde Craven North Carolina 

Fredrick Louis Detrick Maryland 

Frederick R. Devine Rhode Island 

George Ward Disbrow. .... New Jersey 

Charles Reid Edwards. . /. Maryland 

Vertie Edward Edwards North Carolina 

Id alberto H. Fajardo Infante Cuba 

W. Frank Gemmtll Pennsylvania 

Harry Goldsmith Maryland 

Nathaniel Jay Gould Virginia 

Leonard Hays Maryland 

Claudius Abu ah HAYwoRTH...iVor^ Carolina 

Edward Francis Heid Pennsylvania 

Clyde Hoke Hemphill North Carolina 

Clarence Wrigley Judd Pennsylvania 

Gerard Henry Lebret New Jersey* 



Howard Edward Lecates Maryland 

Herman Harry Levin Connecticut 

Frederick Leonard McDaniel Alabama 

William Tillman Martin Maryland 

Franklin Dashiell Murphy Maryland 

Simon Chas. Neistadt Maryland 

Elmer Newcomer Maryland 

Norbert Charles Nitsch Maryland 

Walter Anthony Ostendorf.- Maryland 

Hern an Marino Perez y Quint an a. . . Cuba 

Thomas Ruffin Pratt, Jr North Carolina 

Harry C. Raysor South Carolina 

William Henry Scruggs, Jr Georgia 

Gerald Clyde Shuler ' Virginia 

William W. Sirak Pennsylvania 

Hamilton J. Slusher Virginia 

Manly Coke Smith South Carolina 

Joseph Sparck Maryland 

Hartwell Graham Stoneham Virginia 

William Houston Toulson. . v . Maryland 

Edgar E. Travers Maryland 

Cleveland D. Whelchel. .V. Georgia 

T. Butler Woods South Carolina 

William O. Wrightson.' South Carolina 



PRIZEMEN. 

University Prize— Gold Medal Jesus Maria Buch Portuondo 



Hamilton J. Slusher 
Charles Reid Edwards 



Certificates op Honor 



Nathaniel Jay Gould 



Claudius Abijah Hayworth 
W. Frank Gemmill 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1912-1913. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 161 

School of Medicine 309 

Department of Law 173 

Dental Department 167 

Department of Pharmacy 97 

Training School for Nurses 85 

Total 992 



25 



MATRICULATES, BALTIMORE MEDICAL 
COLLEGE, 1912-1913. 



The following students were in attendance in the Baltimore Medical 
College prior to its merging with the University of Maryland, June 1, 1913. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Name State 

Alzarez, Jos£ A Porto Rico 

Bolen, Henry L Massachusetts 

Brooke, Chas. R Maryland 

Brown, Thos. E .* Pennsylvania 

Brett, Gustave New York 

Baez, Santiago Porto Rico 

Brackett, Leon G Massachusetts 

Carasquilla, Honorio Porto Rico 

Cole, Lewis Furbeck New York 

Cavello, Michael E New York 

Campo, Tony R New York 

Dillon, William J Massachusetts 

DeVere, Gerard Dutch West Indies 

Davis, P. D New York 

Eyestone, Fred. L Ohio 

Glatzaxt, Lewis W Pennsylvania 

Hannigan, S. Roscoe Pennsylvania 

Herrington, D.J North Carolina 

Knapp, Henry Lee New Hampshire 

Lovely, Bernard Henry New Hampshire 

Lay, Juan A Cuba 

Lanadrid, F. S Cuba 

Light, Ellsworth Emmett Massachusetts 

Linnehan, George M Massachusetts 

Miller, John Edward Vermont 

Melroy, Raymond S Wisconsin 

Mayo, W. B Utah 

Meji as, Francisco J Porto Rico 

Nicholson, Frank New York 

Oddo, Vincent Massachusetts 

Oduber, Jacob Dutch West Indies 

O'Malley, William F New York 

Pruitt, Sam Orr South Carolina 

Rios, Maatsl Garcia Porto Rico 

Rzos, Ramon R Porto Rico 

Ruzicka, Francis F Maryland 

Schaeffer, Stewart Seibert Pennsylvania 

Sharpe, Horace W New York 

Sosa, Carmelo Porto Rico 

Steffy, Gideon H Maryland 

Strandberg, H New Jersey 

Va88alo, John E Mwehv*ett$ 

Wbllman, Harrison M Ptnn$ylvnU 

26 



PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

Name Statu 

Daves, John Virginia 

Gleason, John L Connecticut 

Goldberg, A. M Maryland 

Mabesca, R. J New Jersey 

Rigau, Gabbjel Porto Rico 



SPECIALS. 

Gauvain, Ernest A Maryland 

Hodges. Henry S North Carolina 

Lewis, W. C Pennsylvania 

Lopes, Enferio Porto Rico 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Armstrong, Ralph H Pennsylvania 

Bailin, Robert New York 

Calladine, Thomas, Jr New York 

Clinkscales, Reuben C South Carolina 

Childs, Chapin C New York 

Diebolder, Oscar A Germany 

Dominguez, Thomas Porto Rico 

Dooley, George E Connecticut 

Durkin, Patrick Rhode Island 

English, Samuel M , Pennsylvania 

Foley, Joseph D Massachusetts 

Garrido, Manuel Porto Rico 

Gillette, Harold E New York 

Gonzales, Carlos Porto Rico 

Greenspun, Hyman Pennsylvania 

Grossman, Louis W Pennsylvania 

Gatsopoulos, Petros N Greece 

Ginsburg, Jacob Maryland 

Hughes, Samuel North Carolina 

Higgins, Gerald L New Jersey 

Hay, Edward F Pennsylvania 

Jenrette, Wendell V North Carolina 

Jordan, Wm. B Massachusetts 

Jones, Milton E Maryland 

Jarman, Alonzo Russell North Carolina 

Kelly, B. R Connecticut 

Litzinger, R. W Mar/land 

Linhardt, Oscar V Maryland 

Lanich, Lloyd L Pennsylvania 

McGuffie, Charles R West Virginia 

Meyers, Lloyd R Pennsylvania 

Miller, W. Cleland Pennsylvania 

McReynolds A. E Illinois 

Machin Frank: H Maryland 

Maxwell John A Connecticut 

McCullough, Kenneth J Delaware 

Moses, Charles Howard Pennsylvania 

Meyers, Charles W Pennsylvania 

McKenna, William G Rhode Island 

Neale, Vivian J Maryland 

Naumann, Albert A Massachusetts 

O'Neale, Jobeph T Massachusetts 

Pasuth, Bartholomew C Connecticut 



Name State 

Pole, Charles A Maryland 

Riordan, Arthur II Massachusetts 

Ruark, William T North Carolina 

Sanders, L. C South Carolina 

Shipley, Frank E Maryland 

Sima, Charles E Maryland 

Snyder, Samuel S Pennsylvania 

Studebaker, David C Pennsylvania 

Streett, Russell B Connecticut 

Scher, Isidor New York 

Sharkey, Myles B New York 

Umpierre, Ramon Porto Rico 

White, Clarence S West Virginia 

Wright, Harold G New York 

Windsor, W. W Maryland 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Agnew, John Robert New York 

Blanchard, William B Connecticut 

Cas8illi, Arthur New Jersey 

Chenoweth, B. M West Virginia 

Church, Frederick E Massachusetts 

Cobleigh, H. R. C Massachusetts 

Coltraine, John W North Carolina 

Culverhouse, J. B Massachusetts 

Dailey, Gilbert L Pennsylvania 

DiAngelo, V. F New York 

Douthirt, Cranford H Maryland 

Downey, J. Frank Massachusetts 

Dull, J. E Pennsylvania 

Genell, Ernest G New Jersey 

Glover, Victor L West Virginia 

oldfarb, Samuel Maryland 

Grazier, George G Pennsylvania 

Guzman, Manuel Porto Rico 

Hoak, Warren H Pennsylvania 

Lewis, Nolan D. C Pennsylvania 

Lebares, G. A .* Philippine Islands 

Miller, Byron Y Vermont 

McLellan, W. E ? Massachusetts 

Morison, G. P Pennsylvania 

O'Neill, John C Connecticut 

Pinto, Nicholas W New Jersey 

Rieger, Ernest M. G. New York 

Roman Manuel Porto Rico 

Romeu, Ernesto Porto Rico 

Saadeh, Najib A Syria 

Schaun, Paul Edward Maryland 

Updike, E. H West Virginia 

Van Orman, Vilas G New York 

Wood, Austin H Pennsylvania 

Young, Charles A Pennsylvania 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Blanchet, Louis A Canada 

Bicking, C. Austin Pennsylvania 

Bove, Charles F New York 

Clift, John White Vinton Maryland 

28 



Namb Stat» 

Cuktin, William Edward Masaachusett* 

Farbhr, Daw80N L Ohio 

Gat-Lord Lyman W Maryland 

Gibbs, Howard W Massachusetts 

Gluckstein, Alexander M New York 

Kaplan, Michael New York 

Keim, Albert L Pennsylvania 

Kraft, Harry Nelson Maryland 

Lassise, Enrique Porto Rioo 

LeValle, Irving H. New York 

Leddy, Robert C Connecticut 

Leone, Chas. B New York 

Marr, Ernest G Germany 

Morrison, James Bernard Canada 

McDuffie, Charles G New Hampshire 

McLeod, Alexander Alabama 

Nah, Victor C Mexico 

Piness, George New Jersey 

Regan, L. J New York 

Reynolds, Calvin Lewis Virginia 

Riley, Edwards Murray South Carolina 

Riley, William M Pennsylvania 

Schlhsinger, Henry Pennsylvania 

Schneider, Gordon W New Ysrk 

Sell, Roger K Pennsylvania 

Sillim an, Grover A New York 

Silverman, Max K New York 

Smith, Boylston D Alabama 

Stokes, William E California 

Thomas, Robert E Pennsylvania 

Whitney, George M Maryland 

Zimmerman, George L Pennsylvania 

Zimmerman, Ira M Pennsylvania 

GRADUATES— SESSION OF 1912-1913. 

C. Austin Bicking ■*, Pennsylvania 

Charles F. W. Bove *C. New York 

William Edward Curtin 1^ Connecticut 

John White Vinton Clift...** Maryland 

Dawson L. Farber Y\, Ohio 

Lyman Windley Gay-Lord . . .vi Maryland 

Howard W. Gibbs & Massachusetts 

Albert L. Keim t: Pennsylvania 

' Enrique Lassise Rivera y. Porto Rico 

Charles B. Leone K. New York 

Irving Howard LaValle — *T New York 

James Bernard Morrison ....1.*. Canada 

Alexander McLeod Jy Alabama 

Ernest G. Marr K. Germany 

Victor C. N ah Mexico 

*■ George Pijtess f. New Jersey 

William Murdock Riley Ky Canada 

Edwards Murray Riley Y. South Carolina 

Calvin Lewis Reynolds K./ Virginia 






William Ellis Stokes Yy. California 

Grover Asa Silliman Yy New York 

Roger K. Sell y Pennstjlvania 

Gordon William Schneider . . . Yy New York 

Max Kaufman Silverman New York 

29 



Name State 

Henry Schlesingeh. . . . Y Pennsylvania 

Boylston D. Smith U Alabama 

Robert E. Thomas iC/ Pennsylvania 

Ira M. Zimmerman X. y Pennsylvania 

George Luther Zimmerman.^ Pennsylvania 

THE COLLEGE MEDAL AND PRIZES. 

The Gold Medal and the R. B. Warfield Surgical Prize to Alexander McLeod of Alabama. 

The S. K. Merrick Prize to Grover Asa Silliman of New York. 

The W. B. Perry Gynecological Prize to Enrique Lassise Rivera of Porto Rico. 

The J. M. H. Rowland Obstetrical Prize to George Piness of New Jeraey. 

The J. Burton Rutherford Prize to Henry Schlesinger of Pennsylvania. 

The Arminius C. Pole Anatomical Prize to P. N. Gatsopoulos of Greece. 

ALUMNI. 

This College has been in existence thirty-two years and has two thousand 
and forty-nine (2049) medical alumni, and three hundred and fifty-four (354) 
dental alumni. 



80 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest institutions of medical education in America, having been 
chartered in 1807, under the title of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land. 

Five years later, in 1812, by authority of the General Assembly 
of Maryland, the College of Medicine of Maryland was empowered 
to annex to itself three other colleges or faculties, viz: The Faculty 
of Divinity, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four faculties or colleges thus united were "constituted an 
University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

The Medical School of the University is thus its oldest department 
and ranks fifth, in point of age, among the medical colleges of the 
United States. 

Throughout the century of its existence it has always taken 
rank as one of the leading medical colleges of the South, and among 
the most widely known and most highly honored of the schools 
of medicine of the country. 

Beginning with the modest number of five, composing the first 
graduating class in 1810, the list of graduates in medicine of the 
University of Maryland, now numbers five thousand nine hundred 
and fifteen names, drawn from all parts of the United States 
and from abroad, among which are to be found some of the most 
noted names connected with the history of medicine in our country. 

While from the foundation of the University of Maryland, the 
policy of the Faculty of Physic has been one of wise conservatism, 
it has, at the same time, never been behindhand in the march of 
educational progress, and while retaining for so long a time as they 
were of real value, those features of older educational methods which 
were wisest and best, they have often been first, and always among 
the first, in the adoption of all measures tending to improvement in 
methods of medical teaching, and to true elevation of the standard 
of medical education. 

31 



In illustration of this the following facts may be mentioned: 
It established one of the first Medical Libraries and the first Med- 
ical College Library in the country (1813). 

It was among the very first to provide for adequate clinical instruc- 
tion by the erection of its own hospital, available at all times for the 
use of students (1823). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland was the 
first medical school in America to make dissecting a compulsory 
part of the curriculum (1833). 

It was the first to give instruction in Dentistry (1837). 
It was among the first to meet the modern demand for instruction 
in specialties (1866). 

It was the first medical school in America to establish separate 
and independent chairs of Diseases of Women and Children (Jan- 
uary, 1867) and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

It was among the first to teach Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence 
(1883.) 

It is the aim of the present Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland to carry out this policy established by its predecessors. 
With this end in view, the Faculty has, in the last few years, 
expended, and is now expending, large amounts in the establishment 
and equipment of its Lying-in Hospital, its Laboratories of Chemistry, 
Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, in the erection of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, which was completed in 1897. and in the erection of 
a new Laboratory Building, recently completed. 

By arrangements just concluded between the two institutions, 
The Baltimore Medical College, established thirty-two years ago and 
having over two thousand graduates, has been merged with the 
School of Medicine of the University of Maryland. 

By this arrangement the members of the Faculty of this well 
known institution become teachers in the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland, which takes over the equipment of the 
Baltimore Medical College and succeeds to all the clinical privi- 
leges which it formerly enjoyed in a number of general and special 
hospitals, thereby greatly increasing and improving the facilities for 
instruction in all departments. 

All graduates of the Baltimore Medical College are now eligible 
for membership in the General Alumni Association of the University 
of Maryland. 

The Faculty is therefore in position to offer to students of medi- 
cine and graduates a course of combined didactic, clinical and labo- 

32 



ratory instruction which will compare favorably with that offered 
by any medical school in the United States. 

The details of this course will be found in the following announce- 
ment of the one hundred and sixth annual course of instruction 
of the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

Throughout the entire period of existence of the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland, clinical teaching has always been 
a prominent and important feature in the course of instruction. 

The ownership and exclusive control by the Faculty of Physic of 
the University Hospital and the Maternity Hospital of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, the exclusive control of the clinical facilities in 
the Maryland General and Maryland Lying-in Hospitals, and the 
clinical privileges enjoyed by the University in the Presbyterian 
Eye, Ear and Throat Charity Hospital, the James Lawrence Kernan 
Hospital and Industrial School of Maryland for Crippled Children, 
the City Hospitals at Bay View, St. Vincent's Infant Asylum and 
other institutions for the care of the sick in and near the city, place 
the Faculty in a position to make unusually prominent this impor- 
tant feature of a medical course, and have enabled it to organize 
and carry into effect a system of thorough clinical teaching whereby 
each member of the several class sections is brought into direct 
personal contact with the cases under examination. 

In addition to the regular daily clinical lectures in the amphi- 
theatre, much attention is given to this strictly bedside instruction. 

The students, in small classes, are required to accompany the 
physician or surgeon through the wards of the hospital, and are 
there trained in making diagnosis, in the dressing of wounds, the 
application of splints, plaster jackets and other appliances, and in 
the handling of the many instruments used in the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease. 

In the Dispensaries and Out-patient Departments, students have 
similar opportunities of familiarizing themselves with methods of 
diagnosis and treatment in the various specialties of medicine and 
surgery, and of observation of such cases as do not require confine- 
ment in bed. 

There is a separate building devoted to the out-patient depart- 

33 



ments of Medicine and Diseases of Children, and there are two 
obstetrical clinics with both ward and out-patient facilities. 

To the student of medicine the value of the training and encour- 
agement thus afforded him in habits of close and accurate obser- 
vation, of self-possession and self-reliance, in the future practice of 
his profession, can hardly be overestimated. 



HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in 
accommodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new 
and modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the former 
building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 
etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

34 



The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used Wa marine hospital 'for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institu- 
tion give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The clinical service of this hospital is controlled exclusively by 
the University of Maryland. It is situated on Linden avenue, north 
of Madison street, is five stories in height, has a capacity of one 
hundred and sixty (160) beds, and is so arranged that patients may 
be brought from the wards directly before the class in the amphi- 
theatre. This hospital contains patients suffering from almost every 
form of indigenous disease, and nearly every variety of injury. 
Special operating and dressing rooms are provided with sterilizers 
and all necessary surgical instruments, apparatus and appliances, 
including Roentgen ray for locating foreign bodies, examining bones, 
etc., and hot and cold water. Dressings and operations occupy a 
large portion of each day. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 

35 



ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

Three resident physicians are annually appointed to this hospital 
from among the graduates of the University. 

For purposes of instruction in this most important branch, the 
members of the Senior Class, after a course of instruction by the 
Demonstrator of Obstetrics on the manikin, are taken in sections of 
two students each, into the wards of the hospital, where, under the 
direct and immediate supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and 
his Chief of Clinic, they are thoroughly instructed in vaginal exami- 
nation and the antiseptic precautions to be taken in making such 
examination, abdominal palpation, the diagnosis of presentations, 
and in the treatment of pregnant women preparatory to labor. 
The sections of the graduating class are assigned in rotation to 
attend labor cases in the hospital, and arrangements are perfected 
whereby members of the section are summoned without delay at 
any hour when labor occurs. 

Students are thus afforded opportunities under the immediate 
supervision of the instructor to become familiar with the mechanism 
of labor in all its stages, and have frequent opportunities to witness 
the application of forceps, and the methods of treatment of the 
various complications of labor. Much attention is also paid to their 
instruction in the subsequent treatment of mother and child. 

The out-door clinic is thoroughly organized, and after instruction 
in the hospital, students of the graduating class are allotted to attend 
labor cases at the homes of patients, under supervision of the 
Professor of Obsetetrics, his Chief of Clinic, or either of the resident 
physicians of the Lying-in Hospital whenever complications or 
difficulties arise. Each student will be required to conduct and keep 
accurate record of at least ten confinement cases, under the super- 
vision of the attending physician. 

By this system of combined didactic, practical, and clinical meth- 
ods of teaching, students of this University are afforded opportunities 
for instruction in this most important branch of medical science 
which are equaled by very few other schools and surpassed by none. 

Synopsis of the Reports of the Resident Physicians for the year ending May 1, 

1913. 

Number of Confinements in Hospital 444 

Number of Confinements in Out-Door Department 702 

Total 1146 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class, 40. 

36 



THE CITY HOSPITALS. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the City Hospi- 
tals, and the dead-house furnishes a great abundance and variety 
of pathological material, which is used for demonstration. 

The City Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds, 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds, 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which was founded in 1877, largely through the 
efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the largest 
special hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1910 there were admitted to the Dispensary and 
Hospital, 10,815 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains one hundred beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state and endowed beds and every mod- 
ern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as well as a most 
beautiful park-like environment and farm and is closely affiliated 
with the University of Maryland. 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland by 
the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to pre- 
sent to its students liberal opportunities for the study of diseases 
of infants and children. 

37 



THE MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material which is under the control 
of the University of Maryland. There is an out-door clinic con- 
nected with this hospital, which is well organized and is under the 
supervision of the Obstetrical Department of this school. 

MOUNT HOPE RETREAT FOR THE INSANE. 

This hospital contains an average of 1,000 patients, is attended 
by Prof. Charles G. Hill, M.D., of this faculty, and presents rare 
opportunities for the study of nervous and mental diseases. 

SOUTH BALTIMORE EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT CHARITY 

HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is situated in south Baltimore and has a large out- 
patient department devoted to Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. 

Dr. H. E. Peterman is visiting surgeon, and small groups of stu- 
dents are sent there for instruction in the above named diseases. 

MARYLAND ASYLUM AND TRAINING SCHOOLS FOR FEEBLE- 
MINDED. 

This hospital situated in the suburbs of Baltimore is owned and 
controlled by the State of Maryland. It contains 700 beds devoted 
to the treatment and training of the feeble minded and epileptics. 
Dr. Frank W. Keating is the superintendent and is Instructor in 
Psycho -Asthenics in the University of Maryland. Sections of the 
Fourth Year class are sent to this hospital for instruction in the 
proper care of feeble minded and epileptics. 

SPRING GROVE STATE HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is a state institution for the treatment of the insane. 
There are 750 beds. Dr. J. Percy Wade is superintendent. Stu- 
dents of this school may be sent to this institution for instruction 
in the diagnosis and treatment of mental diseases. 

SPRINGFIELD STATE HOSPITAL. 

This large state institution for the treatment of mental diseases 
is situated at Sykesville, Md. There are accommodations for 1300 
patients. Dr. J. Clement Clark, the superintendent, is also Asso- 
ciate Professor of Psychiatry in the University of Maryland. 

38 



UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY OR OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

This department of the University Hospital furnishes a most 
abundant supply of material for clinical instruction. During the 
past year the number of visits made by patients to the various 
departments of the Dispensary was 28,737. 

The whole department is arranged and thoroughly organized to 
facilitate the classification of the patients coming under treatment 
and their distribution to the various professors giving clinioal lectures. 

During the intervals between the sessions the regular clinics are 
continued in the amphitheater, and there is also, each day, a bedside 
clinic in the hospital and service in the Dispensary. It will thus be 
seen that the school offers unusual facilities for clinical study dur- 
ing its regular session, and that the continuance of the clinics during 
the year affords opportunity to such students and graduates as can 
spend their time in the city. 

Attention is called to the fact that during the intervals between 
the sessions, from June to October, students have the advantage of 
three hours of clinical instruction daily, between the hours of 11 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY. 

The Maryland General Hospital Dispensary treats 18,000 indigent 
patients annually, and supplies this school with an inexhaustible 
clinic for the instruction of its students. In the outdoor depart- 
ment of the dispensary, advanced students visit and treat patients 
at their homes, under the direction of the dispensary physician or 
his assistants. 

RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Accommodations are provided in dormitories adjacent to the hos- 
pital for resident students. To these are assigned wards in the 
hospital, with attendance upon the sick, under the daily supervision 
of the professors of the University and resident house officers. 
Special attention is called to the fact that in this institution under- 
graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of con- 
stant observation of the sick and of receiving daily bedside instruc- 
tion from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is 
the rule adopted, in order that the experience of the students may 
be as varied as possible. 



39 



LABORATORIES. 



ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. 

This laboratory is in charge of Associate Professor Holland and 
his assistants. It occupies an entire floor of one of the labo- 
ratory buildings and has in addition a smaller room for section 
teaching. The University has recently built its own storage and 
embalming plant, which supplies an abundance of anatomical mate- 
rial. The museum affords a large collection of both wet and dry 
specimens which are used in teaching. There is also a considerable 
amount of material in comparative anatomy. Dissecting tickets 
must be countersigned as an evidence of satisfactory dissecting. 

Anatomical material is furnished in abundance free of charge. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of the Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry, aided by the Demonstrators. Each stu- 
dent during his course has assigned him a table and is fully supplied, 
with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of charge, except 
for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department. 

LABORATORY OF PRACTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped with the latest and most improved 
apparatus. 

Each student is trained to become familiar with the phenomena 
of life by objective and personal study. 

An abundant supply of material is provided for experiment and 
demonstration. 

The laboratory is also well adapted for post-graduate study and 
special research in Physiology, for which opportunity will be given 
under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteids as well as a detailed course in the 

40 



chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which may result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 
The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, will be 
given the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

This laboratory is equipped for teaching Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

There is a large collection of charts, specimens and apparatus used 
in teaching. The necessary equipment for the practice of technique 
is provided. 

LABORATORY OF PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 

The laboratory of Pharmacology and Materia Medica contains 
a complete museum of materia medica preparations including the 
crude drugs, preparations and active principles. 

The laboratory of pharmacology is provided with instruments and 
appliances for demonstrating the physiologic effects of drugs on 
animals! 

LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGICAL HISTOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

In addition to the opportunities which are afforded students for 
the study of gross pathology by the weekly lectures and demonstra- 
tions, and by attendance upon the autopsies at University and 
Bayview Hospitals, laboratory instruction is also given in Pathologi- 
cal Histology and Bacteriology, for which purposes the autopsies fur- 
nish an abundant supply of material. 

Ten hours weekly are devoted to this instruction, which is obliga- 
tory on all second- and third-year students. 

The course of instruction embraces the preparation and study of 
sections illustrating the common lesions of the various organs; the 
miscroscopic examination of urinary sediments; the various methods 
of isolating and identifying microorganisms, and the method of 
staining important microorganisms. 

41 



Graduates and advanced students qualified to profit by such work, 
desiring to undertake special lines of investigation in this depart- 
ment, will be afforded excellent opportunities for study. 

LABORATORY OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped for the study of practical labo- 
ratory work in its relationship to clinical medicine. | Each student 
is supplied with a locker, containing a microscope and sufficient 
apparatus for any ordinary examination. 

The wards and out patient departments of the University and 
allied hospitals furnish an abundance of material for study. 

By reason of individual equipment, much work outside of class 
hours is expected of the student. 

The class room is adequately lighted, and is conveniently situ- 
ated for teaching purposes. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase from 
his widow of the collection of books of Dr. John Crawford, now 
contains 11,645 volumes, 45 current journals and several thousand 
pamphlets. During the year ending June 1, 1913, 905 volumes were 
added. It is open daily during the year, except in August, for the 
use of members of the Faculty, students and the profession gener- 
ally. Books may be taken out without charge by making a deposit 
of three dollars. It is well stocked with recent literature and the 
more commodious quarters acquired in Davidge Hall have promoted 
very much its growth and usefulness. 

Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (181,000 volumes), 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library (280,000 volumes) and the Library 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. The last named library 
receives the leading medical publications of the world and complete 
sets of many journals are available. 

The libraries are open to students of the Medical School without 
charge. 

The nearness of Washington puts the immense libraries of the 
national capital at the disposal of students of this school. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a separate apartment in the main build- 
ing. It is under the care of the curator, Prof. J. Holmes Smith 

42 



and his assistants. It contains a large collection of anatomical prep- 
arations, plaster casts, charts, models, etc., used in teaching anatomy. 
It contains also a number of specimens of comparative anatomy. 
There is a large collection of gross pathological specimens and cut 
sections mounted for demonstration. For the department of obstet- 
rics, there is an excellent collection of normal and abnormal human 
emb^os. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Two monthly journals are published by the University. Old 
Maryland is devoted to the interests of the entire University and is 
published under the auspices of the General Alumni Association. 
Dr. Eugene F. Cordell is editor. The Hospital Bulletin is the pub 
lication of the Medical School. Dr. Nathan Winslow is editor. 



DENTAL INFIRMARY. 

The Dental Department of the University of Maryland is situated 
upon the University grounds, fronting on Greene Street, and adjoin- 
ing the building of the School of Medicine. 

Daily clinics are held in this department in the afternoon from 
2 to 5 o'clock, which are open to students of the School of Medicine, 
and offer excellent opportunities to students intending to practice 
in the country to familiarize themselves with dental operations. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

By arrangements recently concluded between the two institutions, 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, established in 1840, and widely 
and favorably known as one of the oldest and most prominent of 
the institutions of its kind in this country, has become the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, and now occupies 
buildings upon the University grounds. 

The lectures and laboratories in this Department will afford to 
students of the School of Medicine who expect to practice in the 
country, opportunities of acquiring a knowledge of correct methods 
of dispensing medielnes which will be of much value in their future 
practice. 

Special courses of instructions in the laboratories of Pharmacy 
may be arranged for upon payment of a moderate fee. 

43 



ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons. 
Four Resident Physicians. 
Two Resident Gynecologists. 
Two Resident Pathologists. 

TO THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL. 

Three Resident Physicians. 

TO THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

One Chief of House Staff. 
Two Resident Physicians. 
Five Resident Surgeons. 
One Resident Obstetrician. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants. The fee for such hospital residence 
is one hundred and fifty dollars per year, payable in advance. This 
covers lodging, light and fuel. 

Many appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of the University of Maryland are 
eligible. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the beat general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination, or both, and is essential for admis- 
sion to any class. 

The requirements for the issue of the Medical Student Certificate 
are those prescribed by the rules of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, 
and are as follows: 

(A) A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or Univer- 
sity; or, 

44 



(B) A diploma and transcript of record from a fully accredited 
high school, normal school or academy requiring for admission evi- 
dence of the completion of a standard course in primary and inter- 
mediate grades and for graduation, the completion of a standard 
four-year high school course, embracing two years (2 units) of math- 
ematics, two years (2 units) of English, two years (2 units) of a 
foreign language, one year (1 unit) of American History and Civics 
and seven years (7 units) of further credit in language, literature, 
history or science, making the total of units at least fourteen; or, 

(C) An examination in the following branches totaling 14 units: 

(1) Required, 7 units. Units. 
Mathematics — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 3 years) Algebra and 

plane geometry 2 

English — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years) 2 

A Foreign Language — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years)... 2 

U. S. History 1 

Total required units 7 

(2) Elective, 7 units. To be selected from the following: 
English Language and Literature — (in addition to the required 

work) 1 to 2 

Foreign Language — additional Latin, German, French, Italian, 

Spanish or Greek (not less than one year in any one) 1 to 4 
Advanced Mathematics — advanced Algebra, Solid Geometry 

and Trigonometry {\ year each) 1 

Natural Science — Chemistry, 1 year; Physics, 1 year; Biology, 

Botany, Physiology, Zoology (^ to 1 year each) h to 2 

Earth Science — Physical Geography, Geology, Agriculture (§ 

to 1 year each) .- % to 2 

Astronomy — (f year) , § 

Drawing — (£ to 1 year) £ to 1 

History — Ancient, Medieval and Modern, English (1 year 

each) 1 to 3 

Economics — (J year) \ 

Manual Training — (1 year) 1 

Book-keeping— Q to 1 year) 5 to 1 

One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subject for four 
or five periods per week for a year of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to be 
not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 2 semester 
credits or 2 points. 

Conditioned matriculation is not permitted, and all deficiencies 
in credentials presented must be made good by examination before 
the student may be admitted. 

After January 1, 1914, one year of college credits in chemistry, biol- 
logy, physics and French or German will be required in addition to 
the accredited four-year high school course. 

45 



The evaluation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 
iner only, and all students whose entrance qualifications are not clearly 
satisfactory, or whose certificates are not complete, are advised to 
obtain from him or from the Dean blank forms on which to prepare 
a full statement of their previous education, in advance of their 
coming to Baltimore. Such statements to be submitted to the 
Entrance Examiner for his advice as to the course to be pursued. 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Otis, Hall 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 1211 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore. To him must be submitted the credentials of 
all applicants, and by him is issued the certificate upon which the 
student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 
medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 
ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course future difficul- 
ties may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, without 
being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance. 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. 

In order to meet the increased requirements for matriculation 
taking effect January 1, 1914, a special Pre-Medical Course in Chem- 
istry, Physics, Biology and French or German is now offered in 
St. John's College. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, is by contract 
of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's College 
and who have made an approved choice of electives may if they desire 
it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical School of the 
University. If they successfully complete the work of the first med- 
ical year they are graduated with their class with the degree of A B. 
from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work of 
the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and for 
four years he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

46 



At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seven years the M.D. degree, but credit from the Med- 
ical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit has already 
been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica 
and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $125. 

STATUTES. 

1. Cards for completed courses will be issued by the Dean at the 
end of the session. Laboratory tickets and tickets for practical 
anatomy must be countersigned by the proper demonstrators and 
directors. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket will not be 
accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. Every candidate must have passed examinations in the vari- 
ous branches of medicine taught in this school, or show satisfactory 
evidence of having done so in other schools, and also produce evi- 
dence of satisfactory work in practical anatomy and the various 
laboratories. Attendance upon all clinical lectures is obligatory. 

3. Any student failing in more than one-half the yearly exami- 
nations shall be required to repeat the work of the year and shall not 
be allowed to advance with his class. Students deficient in less than 
one-half the year's work are permitted to make up their deficiency 
in the fall examinations. All students are required to stand the 
spring examinations unless excused by the Dean. No student will 
be permitted to enter the third-year class who has not completed all 
first-year work, and no student will be permitted to enter the fourth- 
year class who has not completed all second-year work, nor shall 
a student be advanced from a lower to a higher class if he is con- 
ditioned in more than one major and one minor subject. 

4. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
treasurer before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

5. Examinations for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are con- 
ducted by the several professors. ( 

A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be charged the regular fees for tuition, etc., 

47 



and will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 

and to take examinations in such other branches as may be required, 
should be he permitted to again enter the school as a candidate for 
graduation. 

6. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his final 
examination. 

ANNUAL LIMITATION OF RULES AND FEES. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1914, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees, and all 
the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year) $5 . 00 

Tuition fee (each year) 165 . 00 

Graduation fee 30.00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, or 
for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases for 
materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the entire 
amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tuition 
fee for that year will be $160. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this insti- 
tution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning Octo- 
ber 1, 1913. 

They do not apply to students transferred from the Baltimore 
Medical College or to students already in attendance. Such stu- 
dents will be entitled to complete the course at the rates previously 
in force. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first full 
course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses, $25 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this Uni- 

48 



versity, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, "to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year stu- 
dent only, who has successfully completed one year's work in the 
medical course, and no man may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of inability 
to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Classes of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the 

49 



Faculty of Physic to a student of the Senior Class who presents to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and that 
he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition 
fee of that year. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of students' personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books 


S 18 

' 96 
48 
35 
10 


$ 32 

5 

112 
65 
50 
20 


5 o0 


College Incidentals 


16 




128 




80 




100 




75 






Total 


$207 


$284 


§443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Superinten- 
dent of buildings, who may be found at his office on the premises, 
will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts of students. 

For further information, apply to 

R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



The following curriculum is the result of a recent and thorough 
revision of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialities in medicine and surgery 
necessitates a very crowded course and the question of electives is one 
which very soon will be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under nine departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Chemistry including Physiological Chemistry. 

4. Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

5. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

6. Medicine (including Medical Specialities). 

7. Surgery (including Surgical Specialities). 

8. Obstetrics. 

9. Gynecology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Each year consists of thirty-two weeks and is divided into two 
semesters. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body and laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
Tn many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of teachers insures attention to the needs 
of each student. 

In many courses the final examinations as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 

51 



largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work car- 
ried on throughout the course. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY INCLUDING HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

A. C. Pole, M.D Professor of Descriptive Anatomy 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D. ..Professor of Histology and Embryology 

J. W. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

John Evans, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

J. L. Wright, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D Associate in Histology and Embryology 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Lecturer on Osteology and Assistant in Histology and 

Embryology 

W. F. Sowers, M.D Demonstrator in Histology and Embryology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Assistant in Histology and Embryology 

Four assistant demonstrators of Anatomy. 

Anatomy. 

First Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. 

This course embraces the integuments, myology, angiology, oste- 
ology, syndesmology and the peripheral nerves. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in his 
work by competent demonstrators. Examinations are held at regu- 
lar intervals throughout the session, and each student will be held 
to strict account for material furnished him. 

Osteology. Two hours each week for thirty-two weeks. * Lectures, 
demonstrations and recitations. Each student is furnished a skele- 
ton and a deposit is required to insure its return at the end of the 
session. 

Second Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. Lectures, recitations and conferences. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. This 
course includes topographical and applied anatomy of the body cav- 
ities and viscera and the cerebro-spinal and sympathetic nervous 
systems with special demonstrations of important subjects to the 
class in small sections. 

The teaching of anatomy is illustrated by means of charts, dia- 
grams, special dissections and the projection apparatus. 



52 



Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work ; six hours 
each week throughout the session. The most important part of the 
work will be done in the laboratory, where each student will be 
provided with a microscope, apparatus, staining fluids and material 
necessary for the preparation of specimens for microscopical exami- 
nation. An important aid to the course is the projection microscope 
which is used for the projection upon a screen of magnified images 
of the specimens actually used in the laboratory. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; two hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick, 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryolog}^. In the 
laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages of 
development, and sections of the chick at different periods of incu- 
bation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter part 
of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through dif- 
ferent regions of a mammal. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Physiology 

T. L. Patterson, M.A Associate Professor of Physiology and Biology 

C. C. Conser, M.D Associate in Physiology 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D Demonstrator of Physiology 

E. L. Bishop Laboratory Assistant in Biology 

First Year. 1. General Biology. This course is designed to serve 
as a practical introduction to the course in physiology and aims to 
acquaint the student with the elementary forms, forces, and laws 
of living nature upon which practically all medical science is depen- 
dent. First half year, lectures and conferences three hours a week. 
Laboratory four hours a week. Associate Professor Patterson and 
Mr. Bishop. 

2. Physiology. This course follows the course in General Biology 
and includes the physiology of blood, circulation, respiration, and 
a portion of the nervous system. Second half year, lectures and 
conferences three hours a week. Associate Professor Patterson. 

Second Year. 3. Advanced Physiology, Biochemistry and Bio- 
physics. This course covers the entire field of physiology in a series 

53 



of lectures, demonstrations and conferences that is based upon an 
already acquired knowledge of the elements of this science as given 
under No. 1 and 2. The doctrines and theories of modern physi- 
ology as far as they give promise of fruitful development of this 
science are discussed and weekly conferences are held between the 
classes and the teacher. Thus the Ionic hypothesis — the theory of 
solutions (Vant HofI — Arrhenius — J. H. Hamburger — DeVries) and 
its relation to biochemistry. The theories of immunity (Metschni- 
koff — Ehrlich) — the doctrine of neuro-chemic co-ordination and its 
bearing to pharmaco-tropism are made comprehensible to the stu- 
dent. Lectures and conferences three hours a week. Professor John 
C. Hemmeter assisted by Dr. Conser. 

4. Experimental Biophysics and Biochemistry. This is a purely 
Laboratory course in the dynamics of muscle and nerve, nervous 
system, circulation and respiration. The field covered is that as 
outlined in Hemmeter's Manual of Practical Physiology. Labora- 
tory six hours a week for five months. Associate Professor Patterson, 
Drs. Conser, G. W. Hemmeter. 

5. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a Laboratory course 
intended for advanced Laboratory students (optional) who may wish 
to do special work in this line of physiology. Hours to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Patterson. 

6. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students will be 
admitted to the laboratory which is well adapted for post-graduate 
study and special research. Hours will be arranged to suit individ- 
uals. Professor John C. Hemmeter. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., M.D Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology 

Daniel Base, Ph.D Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D Associate in Chemistry 

First Year. General Chemistry and Toxicology. 1. Lectures and 
Recitations. Two hours per week throughout the session. 

A course of lectures and recitations upon inorganic chemistry, 
fully illustrated by experiments. Particular attention is paid to 
those elements and compounds which are used in medicine or are 
of a poisonous character. Professor Coale. 

2. Laboratory Work. Eight hours per week for one semester. 

Each student during his course has assigned him a table and is 

54 



fully supplied with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of 
charge, except for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

The course of instruction embraces: (1) Training in the proper 
care and use of apparatus and in the manipulative processes used 
in the laboratory. (2) The experimental study of the more impor- 
tant elements and compounds, and the repetition of experiments 
performed in the course of lectures. (3) Instruction in the elements 
of qualitative analysis. Special attention is paid to the detection 
of the more important inorganic poisons. Professor Base and Dr. 
Kelly. 

Second Year. Organic and Physiological Chemistry. 1. Lectures 
and recitations. One hour per week throughout the session. 

This course includes the study of general organic chemistry with 
special attention to the more important carbon compounds which 
are of particular inportance to the student of medicine, with refer- 
ence to their relations to physiology, pathology and clinical medi- 
cine. Professor Coale. 

2. Laboratory Work. Six hours per week for one semester. 

This includes a study of the properties of the food stuffs, their 
decomposition and metabolic products, digestion, the blood, chem- 
istry of the secretions and excretions, and the various abnormal 
compounds resulting from perverted metabolism. The student will 
be expected to familiarize himself with the manipulation of the 
apparatus in use in the study of the various secretions, excretions 
and fluids of the body. Associate Professor Whitney. 

Special Courses. Original Investigation. Graduates and ad- 
vanced students competent to undertake such work, who desire to 
pursue special chemical investigation, will be given the opportunity, 
under suitable regulations, with the advice and assistance of the 
Instructors of the Department. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY AND 
THERAPEUTICS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Materia Medica 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

William Caspari, Jr., Ph.G., M.D.... Associate Professor of Materia Medica 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D Demonstrator of Materia Medica 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Assistant in Pharmacology 

First Year. Two hours per week throughout the session are 
devoted to didactic lectures in materia medica proper, including the 
source, part used, habitat, active constituents, preparations and 

55 



doses. This course includes instruction in pharmacy and the stu- 
dent is familiarized with the ordinary preparations of drugs. Asso- 
ciate Professor Caspari. 

Second Year. Two hours per week throughout the session to 
didactic instruction in materia medica, pharmacology and thera- 
peutics. Professor Shipley. 

The class is divided into sections and each section has two hours 
a week throughout the session in laboratory pharmacology. 

The physiological action and toxicology of the more important 
remedial agents are observed on animals, and small sections of stu- 
dents work out these observations for themselves. Associate Pro- 
fessor Whitney and Dr. Wylie. 

Prescription writing and the physical properties of drugs together 
with recitations and assigned work, one hour per week throughout 
the course. Dr. Sinsky. 

Third Year. Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences. 
One hour a week to entire class throughout the session. 

This course is supplementary to the lectures on the Principles of 
Medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Associate Professor Lockard. 

Physical Therapeutics. This course consists of weekly lectures and 
demonstrations on hydrotheraphy, thermotheraphy, massage, rest 
and exercise, the Weir Mitchell Treatment, radiotheraphy and elec- 
trotherapeutics. The basic physiologic principles and actions of the 
above mentioned agencies are given full consideration and study 
and the practical application is observed in the hospital and clinic 
and in visits to various institutions having well equipped depart- 
ments for treatment by physical means. A few lectures on sugges- 
tions are also given as the subject properly belongs to such a course. 
Professor Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Applied Therapeutics. During this year instruc- 
tion in the treatment of diseased conditions by remedial agents 
forms a large part of the teaching of medicine and the medical 
specialties. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.E., M.D Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

H. R. Spencer, M.D .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Howard J. Maldies, M.D Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Isaac M. Macks, M.D ....... .Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Harry W. Stoner, M.D Lecturer on Bacteriology 

Roscoe C. Metzel, M.D Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Leo Karlinsky, M.D Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology 

56 



Instruction in this department is given during the second and 
third years by lectures, laboratory work, quizzes, conferences and 
the demonstrations of fresh and prepared specimens, and in the 
fourth year by a clinical pathological conference. 

Second Year. Bacteriology. Thirteen hours a week for eleven 
weeks. Lectures, 30 hours. Laboratory work, 113 hours, total 143 
hours. 

This subject is taught by lectures and practical laboratory work. 
The students are familiarized with the preparation of media, the 
cultivation, isolation and identification of bacteria and general labo- 
ratory technique as applied to clinical medicine. The important 
pathogenic micro-organisms are studied culturally with such non- 
pathogenic forms as are necessary for comparison. At intervals 
mixed cultures are given out to the class and the students are re- 
quired to isolate and identify the bacteria in the mixture. 

Animal inoculations and autopsies are performed in connection 
with the bacteria studied. Studients will also perform and study 
the serum reactions used for diagnosis, complement fixation tests 
and vaccine therapy. In this course is included the technique of 
the bacterial examination of water and milk. 

Pathology. This subject is taught in the second and third years 
with conferences in the fourth year. Lectures, 90 hours, laboratory 
work 212 hours, total 302 hours. 

The course is divided as follows: Second Year. General pathol- 
ogy, including the study of inflammations, degenerations, circulatory 
disturbances, infective granulomata and tumors. Eight hours a 
week for nineteen weeks, total 152 hours. 

This course extends from January to June. The greater part of 
the practical work is devoted to the study of the microscopic changes 
occurring in the above named conditions. Specimens for micro- 
scopic study are given to the students to be stained and mounted 
and this is supplemented by the study of gross material obtained 
from autopsies and from the museum. In this portion of the course 
an effort is made to train the students in the fundamental lesions 
and principles of pathology. Weekly throughout the course there 
is given a lecture accompanied by a demonstration with the projec- 
tion apparatus. In addition to the laboratory work, there are held 
regular quizzes for which purpose the class is divided into small 
sections. Students are required to be present at autopsies which 
are held frequently, the University and Maryland General Hospi- 
tals furnishing a large amount of material. 

57 



Third Year. Special Pathology. Three hours a week during the 
entire year. In this course the special pathology of the organs and 
systems is studied under the same system as detailed above. Fre- 
quent lectures with the use of the projection apparatus and quizzes 
also accompany this course. 

Students of the third year class are required to assist at autop- 
sies and are trained in the proper technique of the conduct and 
recording of same. 

Fourth Year. Clinical and pathological conferences. One hour 
a week throughout the year, total 30 hours. 

The specimens from autopsies are studied with reference to the 
clinical histories and the gross and microscopic anatomy. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the correlation of the anatomical findings with 
the clinical symptoms and diagnosis. The demonstrations are illus- 
trated with sections of fixed material and cover slip preparations of 
exudates. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AND SURGICAL SPECIALTIES. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Surgical Pathology 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D Professor of Practice of Surgery 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. D. Blake, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

St. Clair Spruill, M.D .Professor of Clinical Surgery 

John G. Jay, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, B.A., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

J. W. Holland, M.D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Associate in Clinical Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate in Operative Surgery 

John A. Tompkins, Jr., M.D Instructor in Minor Surgery and Bandaging 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

F. J. Kirby, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Fred Rankin, M.D. . ' Instructor in Surgery 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

The course in surgery is progressive and aims to ground the stu- 
dent firmly in the principles of surgical science in order that later 
he may be prepared to build upon a firm foundation the superstruc- 
ture of surgical art. 

Second Year. During this year a practical course of bandaging 
is given upon the manikin; the student being required to apply 
personally the various forms of bandages to the different parts of 
the body. 

58 



Third Year. Surgical Pathology and Principles of Surgery. Lec- 
tures, recitations and clinics, three hours weekly at the University 
Hospital. The class is divided into sections and receives instruc- 
tion in history taking and surgical diagnosis at the bedside at the 
Maryland General Hospital and the City Hospital at Bay View. 
Professor Shipley and Dr. Lynn. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections and each 
section is given practical and individual work under the supervision 
of the instructors. 

This course begins with the study of the general principles of 
operative surgery; anaesthesia, asepsis, antisepsis, description of in- 
struments and sutures, etc. 

The various operations are first described and demonstrated by the 
instructor, and the student afterward practices them upon the subject. 

The entire subject of operative surgery is fully covered. Professors 
Martin, Spruill, Clinical Professor N. Winslow and Dr. H. C. Blake. 

Attendance upon surgical clinics and upon dispensary service is 
also expected when the student is not engaged in class work at the 
same hour. 

Fourth Year. Practice of Surgery. Illustrated by charts, draw- 
ings, pathological specimens, x-ray demonstrations, lantern slides 
and the balopticon, three hours a week. Professors Winslow and 
Warfield. 

Surgical Clinics. Operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, three 
hours a week to entire class. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin, Blake and Spruill. 

The class is divided into sections for ward instruction in surgery, 
for instruction in operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, and the 
post-operative treatment of surgical conditions, four days a week 
for two hours each day. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin, Blake and Spruill. 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of surgical 
ailments, two hours daily. 

The administration of anaesthetics is taught didactically and prac- 
tically and students are required to administer anaesthetics under 
the direction of an instructor. It is aimed to make the instruction 
during this year practical and to give the student first hand insight 
into the signs and treatment of surgical conditions. A large corps 
of able teachers and clinicians makes it possible to give unusually 
close attention to the practical clinical instruction of each student. 

59 



EYE AND EAR DISEASES. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Wm. Tarum, M.D Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. E. Peterman, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

G. A. Fleming, M.D Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Edward A. Looper, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Eye 

Third Year. Instruction in anatomy, physiology and optics, 
illustrates by models, drawings, lantern slides, sections, etc., one 
hour each week for the first half of the second semester. During 
the last half of the second semester the class is divided into groups 
for demonstrations by sections, specimens, etc. of the anatomy and 
by models, drawings, etc. of the physiology of the eye, one hour 
each week for each section, Associate Professor Tarun. 

Fourth Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on diseased con- 
ditions of the eye; one hour each week for entire course, Professor 
Woods. 

Ear 

Lectures and recitations on anatomy, physiology and diseases of 
the ear, one hour each week during the first semester in addition 
to general clinic and section teaching mentioned below. Professor 
Crouch. 

Eye and Ear 

Clinical lectures and recitations in diseases of the Eye and Ear 
one hour each week during the entire course. Professor Woods. 

The class is divided into sections for instruction in diseases of 
the eye and ear daily throughout the course in the dispensaries of 
the University, Presbyterian Eye and Ear and Maryland General 
Hospitals. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, M.D Chief of Clinic 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Assistant in Dermatology 

Clinical conference one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of the 
skin. Professor Gilchrist. 

60 



Every Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 2 to 3 p.m., clinics 
will be given in the Dispensary by Dr. John R. Abercrombie (Chief 
of Clinic) and Dr. Robinson, so that students can be taught in detail 
how to diagnose and treat the common skin diseases. 

Books. Stelwagon, Schamberg, Jacobi's Atlas. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgerj' 

Compton Riely, M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

Geo. E. Bennett, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction will be given in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre and Dispensary, Maryland General, at the 
Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children, at 
" Radnor Park," and Dispensary of same at 2000 North Charles 
Street. Twenty-eight weekly lectures will be given in the Univer- 
sity Amphitheater to the senior class as a whole and sections will 
be assigned to the out-patient and bed-side clinics. 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and instru- 
ments required in this surgical specialty, including x-ray technique; 
Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; deformities of the feet; 
non-tubercular diseases and deformities of bones and joints; the 
paralyses; the bursal, tendonous and muscular conditions producing 
orthopedic affections; rickets, scurvy, osteomalacia and chondro- 
dystrophies; wry-neck and the use and application of orthopedic 
apparatus. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose 

H. C. Davis, M.D. Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and Xose 

George Mtjrgatroyd, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

H. W. Nicholson, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Fourth Year. Clinical lectures. One hour each week through 
out the session. Professors Merrick and John R. Winslow. 

Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the University Hospital. Clinical Professor Johnston and Dr. Davis. 

ftl 



Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the Maryland General Hospital. Drs. Murgatroyd and Nicholson. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. B. Wolf, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

A. J. Underhill, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary 

F. W. Hoblemann, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

This course is entirely clinical and is taught chiefly in the dis- 
pensary. The student assumes the responsibility of certain cases 
under the supervision of instructors. 

The course includes the diagnosis, pathology and treatment of 
venereal diseases and syphilis together with a careful study of the 
less common genito-urinary diseases. The course includes instruc- 
tion in urinalysis, in endoscopic and cystoscopic examinations and 
the use of other instruments for the diagnosis and treatment of 
genito-urinary diseases. Many minor operations are performed in 
the out-patient department. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON, RECTUM AND ANUS. 

G. Milton Linthicum, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

John G. Jefpers, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This subject will be taught by lectures, recita- 
tions and ward classes. The lectures will cover the essential features 
of the anatomy and physiology of the large intestine, and its rela- 
tion to the contiguous organs, and the system as a whole. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the amphitheater, 
wards and dispensaries of the University Hospital and the Maryland 
General Hospital, where different phases of the various diseases will 
be taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the 
proctoscope and sigmoidoscope in examination of the rectum and 
sigmoid will be made familiar to each one by its use by the student. 

The methods of treatment, used in the office will be shown by 
treatment in the dispensary. Major and radical operative treatment 
will be given in the amphitheatre in such manner that the student 
can be a part of it. History taking will be emphasized. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND MEDICAL SPECIALTIES. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D Professor of Medicine 

David Streett, A.M., M.D Professor of Practice of Medicine 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medicine 

Harry Adler, B.A., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

J. M. Craighill, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Charles McElfresh, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

G. C. Lockard, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

E. B. Freeman, S.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

J. W. Cole, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D Lecturer on Clinical Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

J. F. O'Mara, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

H. W. Jones, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

H. D. McCartt, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

G. M. Settle, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

J. W. Sanderson, M.D Assistant in Medical Topography 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in 
medical topography and the physical conditions in health, preparatory 
to the course in physical diagnosis in the third year. Two and one- 
half hours each week during the second semester. Professor Zueblin. 

Third Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on the principles 
of medicine, three hours a week throughout the session. Professor 
Wilson. 

Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences; one hour a 
week to entire class throughout the session. 

This course is supplementary to the lectures on the principles of 
medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Associate Professor Lockard. 

Clinical Medicine. Conference and recitations; one hour each 
week to entire class throughout the session. This course is supple- 
mentary to the lectures on the principles of medicine. Associate Pro- 
fessor Freeman. 

Clinical conference; one hour each week throughout the session 
to the entire class. Professor Mitchell. 

Physical Diagnosis. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction two hours each week for the entire 

63 



session in the medical dispensaries of the University and Maryland 
General Hospitals. During the second semester, the students under 
the supervision of the instructors in medicine examine and treat 
patients in the medical dispensary. 

The class is divided into small groups and in the afternoons dur- 
ing one semester these groups are sent to the City Hospitals at Bay 
View and Maryland General Hospital for further instruction in his- 
tory taking and physical diagnosis, one hour each week. 

Fourth Year. Lectures, recitations and clinics, two hours a 
week to the entire class. Professors Street and Wilson. 

Clinical conference one hour a week at the Maryland General Hos- 
pital. Professor Street. 

Pathological-clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. 
Professors Zueblin and Hirsh. 

Clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. Professor 
Zueblin. 

The class is divided into sections for medical ward class instruc- 
tion three hours each week throughut the session. Professors Zue- 
blin, Street, Adler, Craighill, Gichner and McElfresh. 

Dispensary Instruction. The medical dispensary is daily from 12 
to 2 p.m., and the class is divided into small groups for practical 
instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of medical ailments. The 
dispensaries at the University and at the Maryland General Hospi- 
tals are available for this work. 

Clinical Clerk Service. Each man is required to study carefully a 
number of cases during the course for presentation at the medical 
ward classes and clinics. This includes a written history and phys- 
ical examination and examination of urine, blood, stomach contents 
and faeces. Professors Zueblin and Street. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

G. C. Lockard, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

H. C. Hyde, M.D. .\ Lecturer on Pediatrics 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

J. E. Poulton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations, two hours each week. 
Professors Mitchell and O'Donovan. 

Clinical conference, one hour each week at University Hospital. 
Professor Mitchell. 

64 



The class is divided into groups and receives clinical instruction at 
the Maryland General Hospital and St. Vincent's Infant Asylum, 
three groups each week. Professor O 'Donovan and assistants. 

Dispensary instruction daily at the University Hospital. Drs. 
Lockard and Hyde. 

DISEASES OF THE STOMACH AND INTESTINES AND OF 
METABOLISM. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A. H. Carroll, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

Robert A. Warner, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ulrich, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

This course consists of an out patient department or polyclinic in 
which the students of the graduating class are assigned weekly upon 
cases which they are directed to study and examine thoroughly and to 
report in person to the principal clinic once a week. 

All physical, chemical and microscopic work is done by the student 
himself and the report is read, with the presentation of the patient, 
which is followed by a conference with the director of the clinic. 
Many of these reports were of such merit that they were published 
in the Hospital Bulletin, and they are made to figure in forming the 
general average of the student. 

In addition to the ordinary diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract, 
this course embraces diseases of the soft tissues of the mouth and of 
the esophagus; gastroscopy; esophagoscopy and duodenal intubation. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

C. Irwin Hill, A.B., M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Milton P. Hill, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week to 
entire class throughout the year. This course includes anatomy and 
physiology of the nervous system. The method of neurological exam- 
ination and relationship of signs and symptoms to pathological con- 
ditions are taught. The material at the University, Maryland Gene- 
eral and City Hospitals is available 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week 
throughout the entire session, during which organic and functional 

66 



nervous diseases are taught at the University, Maryland General 
and City Hospitals at Bay View. All cases presented at these clinics 
are carefully examined; and complete written records are made by 
the students who demonstrate the case before the class. These 
cases are usually assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, 
and each student in the class, must prepare one or more cases dur- 
ing the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections, two hours each week 
during entire year at the University and Maryland General Hospi- 
tals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the cases in the wards under the supervision of the instructors. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dis- 
pensary, four afternoons each week, in this way students are brought 
in contact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later man- 
ifestations. 

Electro Therapeutics. Instruction in the uses of the various types 
of electrical apparatus is given by lectures and demonstrations in 
the clinics, ward classes and out patient department. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HYGIENE. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene 

Second Year. One hour each week for entire session. 

Medical Jurisprudence. This course embraces consideration of med- 
ical evidence and testimony, confidential communications, malpractice, 
indications of death, pregnancy, delivery, infanticide and insanity. 

Hygiene. This course embraces consideration of impurities in air, 
purification of air, lighting, heating, purification of water, filtration, 
removal of waste, disposal of sewerage, disinfectants, practical dis- 
infection, food, preservation of food, beverages, exercise and clothing. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology 

H. U. Todd, M.D Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 

This is a practical laboratory course, with a portion of the time 
devoted to lectures. Eleven hours each week for one semester. 

The practical application of chemistry, physical chemistry, physi- 
ology and microscopy to the diagnosis and study of disease is taught. 
Each student is required to make examinations of stomach contents, 
faeces, blood, urine, sputum, and exudates and transudates. Especial 
effort is made to show the relation of laboratory findings to the his- 

66 



tory and course of the disease as observed in clinical work. Haema- 
tology is taken up and haematological technique taught. Parasi- 
tology and its bearing on clinical medicine is considered. Serum 
changes in disease and immunity are also carefully outlined. 

HISTORY OF MEDICINE. 
Eugene F. Cordell, A.M., M.D Professor of History of Medicine 

First Year. Lecture, one hour each week throughout the course. 

This course is designed for those just entering upon the study of 
medicine and will, therefore, be elementary. The lecturer will dwell 
specially upon the great epochs in the annals of medicine and upon 
the lives and achievements of the great men who have led the way 
in medical progress. He will endeavor to present the subject to 
the class in such a way as to arouse in their minds sentiments of 
pride and love for the profession which they have chosen, and by 
stimulating their enthusiasm and ardor in their studies, lighten the 
burden which is inevitable in the task before them. 

TUBERCULOSIS OF THE LUNGS. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medicine 

John E. O'Neill, M.D Chief of Clinic 

A practical course is given in the Dispensary and at the Municipal 
Tuberculosis Hospital to small groups in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of pulmonary tuberculosis. The abundance of the material, 
both in incipient and advanced cases, makes this course of value in 
the practical recognition of the physical signs of the disease. 

MENTAL DISEASES. 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Clement Clark, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Percy Wade, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Frank W. Keating, M.D Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D Lecturer on Psychiatry 

C Irwin Hill, A.B., M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week 
throughout the session. During the first semester these lectures deal 
with the etiology and general symptomatology of mental diseases 
and during the second semester clinical lectures are given at the 
City Detention Hospital, Spring Grove Asylum, Springfield State 
Hospital, Mt. Hope Retreat and the Maryland Training School for 
the Feeble Minded. 

67 



STATE MEDICINE. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D Professor of State Medicine 

Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations; one hour each week 
to the entire class throughout the session. 

The course in state medicine begins with a study of structure and 
function of the social organism, as revealed by the numerical analy- 
sis of population, births, deaths, sickness and migration. Elementary 
instruction and practice are given in vital statistics; in medical noti- 
fication, registration and certification; and in the laws and ordinances 
concerning public health. The specific hygiene of the preventable 
diseases is next taken up, such choice being made as will familiarize 
the student with the epidemiology of the more important communi- 
cable diseases, and with the main instruments of prevention; notifi- 
cation, inspection, segregation, isolation, immunization and disinfec- 
tion. The course is planned from the viewpoint of official practice 
in public hygiene. 

TROPICAL MEDICINE. 

James A. Nydegger, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Surgeon U.S.P.H. Service, Profes- 
sor of Tropical Medicine 

A course of lectures on tropical diseases to the Senior class was 
instituted in January, 1913, and continued during the remainder of 
the scholastic year. Eminent authorities on various subjects of this 
important branch of medicine delivered lectures during the course, 
and will continue to deliver lectures during the coming year; one 
hour each week to the Senior class. 

This addition to the curriculum has been made because of the in- 
creasing importance of Tropical Diseases; because of the large num- 
ber of students from southern states attending the school, and be- 
cause a large number of graduates of this school enter the U. S. 
Public Health Service and the Army and Navy Medical Corps, and 
many find employment as civil practitioners in tropical and sub- 
tropical countries. 

The course includes a thorough and comprehensive discussion of 
the history, etiology, pathology, morbid anatomy, differential diag- 
nosis, treatment and prophylaxis (with lantern slide illustrations) of 
the more important tropical diseases, such as amebic and bacillary 
dysentery, Asiatic cholera, plague, yellow fever, trypanosomiasis 
(sleeping sickness) filariasis, piroplasmosis, beri beri, dengue, pellagra, 
leprosy, hook-worm, bilharzia, rocky mountain or tick fever, sprue, 



spirochetosis, etc., and a study of the various parasites affecting 
both man and animals. 

Clinical lectures, presentation of cases, exhibition of specimens and 
practical methods of demonstrating the protozoa and parasites caus- 
ing tropical diseases will also be given. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

L. E. Nbale, M.A., M.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. M. Delevett, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

H. M. Freeman, M.D Chief of Out-patient Department 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations three hours each week by 
Professors Neale and Rowland to entire class. 

Operative obstetrics (manikin work) one hour each week by Pro- 
fessor Neale and assistants to class sections. 

Special obstetric and gynaecologic pathology, two hours each week 
by Professor Hirsh and H. J. Maldeis to class sections in the Path- 
ologic laboratory. 

Obstetric diagnosis (clinical) three hours each week at University 
of Maryland Hospital by Professor Neale and three hours each week at 
Maryland Lying-in Hospital by Professor Rowland to class sections. 

Fourth Year. Clinical Conference, one hour each week by Pro- 
fessors Neale and Rowland at University Hospital and Maryland 
Lying-in Hospital to entire class. 

Students are required to attend obstetric cases before, during and 
after confinement both in the University Hospital and the Maryland 
Lying-in Hospital as well as the out patient department associated 
with both hospitals and each student will be required to conduct and 
make accurate records of at least ten confinement cases seen under 
the personal supervision of one of the physicians connected with this 
department. 

There are about 1200 obstetric cases annually available for teach- 
ing purposes and the student is afforded opportunities for instruction 
in this most important branch of medical science which are equalled 
by very few other schools in this country. 

There are ample accommodations in both hospitals for public and 
private patients. 



69 



DEPARTMENT OF DISEASES OF WOMEN. 

Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D Professor of Diseases of Women 

W. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

H. W. Brent, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

W. K. White, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

J. M. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Lectures, one hour each week throughout the 
course, thirty-two hours. Professor Ashby. 

The class is divided into sections for recitations and conferences 
one hour each week. Drs. Brent, Hayward, Willse, Mitchell, Streett, 
and Fenton. 

Fourth Year. Clinics and ward classes daily throughout the 
course in the amphitheatres and wards of the University and Mary- 
land General Hospitals. Professors Ashby, Perry and Hundley. 

Dispensary Instruction. The class is divided into small groups and 
receives instruction daily in the out patient departments of the Uni- 
versity and Maryland General Hospitals. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

FOR NURSES. 

Ethel P. Clark, R.N., M.U.H. '06. 

Superintendent of Training School. 

Mary E. Sullivan, R.N., M.U.H. '11. 

Assistant Superintendent. 

The University of Maryland Hospital Training School for Nurses 
offers a three years' course of training. 

Those wishing to obtain the course of instruction must apply per- 
sonally or by letter to the Superintendent of Nurses, who will fur- 
nish printed instructions respecting the personal information to be 
given by applicants. Letters of application should be accompanied 
by a statement from a clergyman testifying to good moral character 
and from a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired fac- 
ulties. Applicants must be between twenty-two and thirty-five 
years of age, of at least average height and physique, and must give 
satisfactory evidence of fitness in disposition and temperament for 
the work of nursing. 

70 



If approved, applicants are received into the school for a period 
of six months on probation during which time demonstration classes 
are held and they are given instruction in the elementary part of the 
training. 

Classes are formed and pupils are received in the spring and autumn. 

High school graduates and women of higher education are given 
the preference. Their superior preparation makes them better 
fitted for the opportunities that are opening up in the profession of 
nursing. Graduates of this school are elegible for Red Cross and 
all Government work. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness of proba- 
tioners for the work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing 
them and she may at any time determine the connection of a pupil 
with the school in case of misconduct, inefficiency or neglect of duty. 

Except under special circumstances failure to pass the examina- 
tions at the end of the first year is considered a sufficient cause for 
the termination of a student's connection with the school. 

Students reside in the home and serve as assistants in the various 
departments of the Hospital for the full three years. They are ex- 
pected to perform any duty assigned to them by the Superintendent 
of Nurses. 

After the months of probation, students are required when on 
duty, to wear the dress prescribed by the Hospital which is blue and 
white striped gingham, with white apron and cap and linen collar and 
cuffs. Probationers are not allowed to wear this dress. 

Day Nurses are on duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m with one-half hour 
for dinner and three hours for rest and recreation. They are given 
an afternoon each week and part of every Sunday. Each student is 
required to devote at least one hour daily to lecture, class work or 
study. A vacation of three weeks is allowed each year. 

In sickness all students are cared for gratuitous!}', but the time so 
lost must be made up. 

The course of training includes practical instruction in the nursing 
of medical, surgical, orthopedic, gynaecological patients, obstetrics, 
the nursing of children and the operating room work. 

A course of lectures is given by the physicians and surgeons of the 
University and class instruction with demonstrations by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses and her assistants. Examinations are held at 
stated periods 

When the full term of three years is ended, the nurses thus trained 
will be at liberty to choose their own fields of labor, whether in hos- 

71 



pitals, in private families, or in the various branches of social work 
which offer such tremendous opportunities for the woman of abilty. 
A diploma is given upon completion of course of training. 

In addition to board, lodging and a reasonable amount of laundry 
work, each student receives an allowance of $5 00 per month to de- 
fray the expenses of uniforms, text-books, etc. incidental to her 
training. 

Graduates, 1913 

Dorothy Henrietta Patterson Pennsylvania 

Martha Misikofski Maryland 

Willie Brown Hull Virginia 

Evelyn Houston Chase Virginia 

Edith Mildred Brownell Rhode Island 

Adelaide Caroline Coward North Carolina 

Sophia Frances Hessler Maryland 

Gold a Gleneith Price Virginia 

Mary Rennie Maryland 

Elva Lydia Dean Maryland 

Mary Myrtle Selby Maryland 

Margaret Gertrude Laws Maryland 

Anna Elizabeth Butts Maryland 

Volina Maybell Rutherford Virginia 

Mary Ann Rutherford Virginia 

Pearl Levora Rush Maryland 

Katherine Veronica Shea Massachusetts 

Natalie Isabel McCann Maryland 

Katherine Woodall Welch Maryland 

Edith Dent Washington 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the Board of 
Trustees of this Fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. 
Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 

Harry Adler, M.D. D. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Eugene F. Cordell, M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar. D. 

Charles Markell, LL.B. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland/' and is independent and self-perpetuating, 
filling itself its vacancies. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied in the dis- 
cretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. Contributions, 
donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. They 
may be made to the general or University Fund to the Medical 
Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended 
for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical 

72 



fund or to some special object, as building, research, library, pathology, 
hospital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, 
prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly 
regarded. Attention is invited to the " Charles Frick Research 
Fund," already established in memory of that distinguished investi- 
gator. Checks payable to Charles Markell, Treasurer, should be 
sent to Dr. Eugene F. Cordell, Chairman, Endowment Committee, 
257 W. Hoffman Street, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 

To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State 
of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 

The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 

The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an 
orator will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old 
classmates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates 
who have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President — John I. Pennington, M.D. 

First Vice-President — Robert P. Bay, M.D. 

Second Vice-President — H. D. Fry. 

Third Vice-President — J. I. King. 

Recording Secretary, A. H. Carroll, M.D. 

Assistant Recording Secretary, J. Carroll Monmonier, M.D. 

Corresponding Secretary, J. F. Smith, M.D. 

Treasurer, John Houff, M.D. 

Executive Committee — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D., Chairman, C. R. Win- 
terson, M.D., B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D., G. H. Hocking, M.D., S. T. 
Earle, Jr., M.D. 

Application for membership should be accompanied with Initiation Fee of 
$1.00 and mailed to the Corresponding Secretary or Treasurer. 

73 



GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President— James W. Bowers. 

Vice-President — Isaac H. Davis, M.D. 

Treasurer — Eugene W. Hodson. 

Secretary — John Henry Skeen. 

Corresponding Secretary — Nathan Winslow, M.D. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

J. E. Evans, President. 

This Association since its establishment, seventeen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

The Association now occupies comfortable rooms in one of the buildings of 
the University. 

Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout 
the College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character 
and morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session to wel- 
come new students to the University, and will also be glad to render assistance in 
the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding houses, etc., and to extend any 
other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges of the Association, and to address the officer named 
below, who will be glad to furnish any information desired regarding the Asso- 
ciation and its work, and to render any assistance in his power, and upon ar- 
riving in the city are requested to make themselves known as soon as possible. 

J. E. Evans, President. 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



74 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 

FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

B. Vernon Cecil, M.A., Sc.D., Vice-President (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Chem- 
istry and Physics. 

John B. White, M.A. (Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 

Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A. (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor of 
Mathematics. 

John Brockaway Rippere, M.A. (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Professor of Latin and Secrt 
tary of the Faculty. 

Charles G. Eidson, B.S.E.E., M.A. (Graduate of the University of Tennessee), Associate Member 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

Adolf Schumacher, Ph.D. (Graduate of G5ttlngen and University of Pennsylvania), Professor of 
French and German. 

Sidney Gunn, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Harvard University), Professor of English. 

Edmond Earl Lincoln, B.A. (Graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and of Oxford, England), 
Professor of History and Political Economy. 

D. Murray Cheston, U.S.A. (Lieutenant of the United States Army), Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 

Reginald H. Ridgely, B.S., MA. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Biology. 

Thomas L. Gladden, Superintendent of the Preparatory School and Instructor in English and 
Latin. 

Roscoe E. Grove, B.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant in Preparatory School. 

Sarah Berry, Registrar and Secretary for the President. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The regular Winter Session begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the followtng 
May. 
The requirements for admission are the same as in all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

Ferdinand J. S. Gorgas, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Emeritus, Professor of Principles of Dental Science 
and Dental Prosthpflis. 

R. Dorsey Coale, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D..S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 

B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Prof essor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 

Eldridge Basejn, M.D., D.D.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Dentistry and Orthodontia. 

J. S. Geiser, D.D.S., Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis and Operative and Prosthetic Technics. 

J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 

Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Instructor of Histology and Dental Anatomy. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Howard J. Maldeis, M.D., Instructor in Bacteriology and Pathology. 

E. Frank Kelly, Ph.G., Director of Chemical Laboratory. 

Herbert F. Gorgas, D.D.S., Director of Dental Infirmary. 

Matriculation and Tuition Fees, per Session, SI 50.00. 

For Information and annual catalogue, address T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, Baltimore, 

Md. 

75 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

FORTY-THIRD ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Judge Henry D. Harlan, Constitutional Law and Domestic Relations. 

Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations, Pleading, Practice and Legal Ethics. 

Judge Henry Stockbridge, International Law, Public and Private; Conflict of Laws, Executors 
and Administrators. 

Edgar A. Poe, Esq., Bills and Notes, Sales, Suretyship, Personal Property and Bailments. 

W. Calvin Chestnut, Esq., Criminal Law and Insurance. 

Judge James P. Gorter, Juridical Equity, Evidence and Damages. 

Judge John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Bankruptcy, 
Patents, Trade-Marks, Copyrights, and Unfair Competition. 

Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., The Law of Real Property. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Title to Real Property, Conveyancing and Director of the Moot Court. 

Albert G. Ritchie, Esq., Commercial Law, Shipping and Elementary Law. 

Charles J. Bonaparte, Esq., The Law of Contracts. 

Judge Carroll T. Bond, Executors and Administrators. 

Samuel Want, Esq., Director of Library and Students' Adviser. 

For catalogue containing full information, Address 

Henry D. Harlan, Dean of Law Faculty 

1061 Calvert Building, 
Baltimore, Maryland. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 1841-1904. 
THE SEVENTIETH ANNUAL SESSION WILL OPEN SEPTEMBER 29. 1913. 

FACULTY. 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Caspabi, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M. R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

H. A. Brown Dunning, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles C. Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Vegetable Histology. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

Henry E. Wick, Phar.D., Demonstrator of Chemistry. 

76 






University of Maryland 



ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTH 
ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF THE 

School of Medicine 



N. E. Corner Lombard and Greene Streets 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SESSION 1914-1915 



BALTIMORE 

WILLIAMS & WILKIN'S COMPANY 

1914 




MARYLAND GENERAL HOSFITAL 



The School of Medicine of 

the University of 

Maryland 



1914 



CALENDAR 



One Hundred and Eighth Annual Session. 

1914. 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University Hospital. 
October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

October 12. — Re-examination of Deficient Students and Examina- 
tion for Advanced Standing. 
November 25. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p.m. 
November 30. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a.m. 
December 23. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 



• CHRISTMAS RECESS. 

1915. 

January 4. — Lectures resumed. 9 a.m. 

May 10. — Final Examinations begin. 

June 1. — Commencement, Annual Meeting of Alumni Association. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor, or Master of Arts or Sciences. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. This school 
was established in Baltimore, Md., in 1807, and offers a high-grade 
course in medicine, extending over a period of four years, and leading 
to the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The Department of Dentistry was founded in 1882, and 
is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral part of the 
School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The Department of Pharmacy was established in 1840 as 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated with the School 
of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers two years, and leads 
to the degree of Doctor of Pharmacy. 

3 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost. 
*R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D. . LL.D. Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. 
Thomas A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D. Philemon H. Tuck, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D, Timothy A. Heatwole, M.D.,D.D.S. 

Hon. John C. Rose Hon. Robert Moss, 

D. M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G.. M.D. David Streett, A.M., M.D. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D. , Ph.D., LL.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 
Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D. Hon. Alfred S. Niles, 

Daniel Base, Ph.D. Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq. 

Ridgelt B. Warfield, M.D. William L. Rawls, Esq. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 
THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 
President of St. John's College. 

PROFESSOR J. B. RIPPERE, M.A., and 

PHILEMON H. TUCK, A.M., LL.D. 

For St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., and 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

For School of Medicine. 

PROFESSORS HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., and 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D. 

For School of Law. 

PROFESSOR T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 
For School of Dentistry. 

PROFESSOR CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 
For School of Pharmacy. 






UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

FOUNDED 1807. 



THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

R. DORSEY COALE, Ph.D., M. D. 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

L. E. NEALE, M.D., LL.D. 

CHARLES W. MITCHELL, A.M., M.D. 

THOMAS A. ASHBY, M.D., LL.D. 

J. HOLMES SMITH, M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D. 

DAVID STREETT, A.M., M.D. 

SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 

RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of Medicine. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., M.D., Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology, 

Dean of the Faculty. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical 

Medicine. 
Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Diseases of Women. 
J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Clinical Medicine. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Surgical Pa- 
thology. 
David Streett, A.M., M.D., Professor of Practice of Medicine. 
Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Practice of Surgery. 
Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Principles of Medicine. 
Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
Jose L. Hirsh, B.A., M.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology and 

Visiting Pathologist to the University Hospital. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 
Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Analytical Chemistry. 
Harry Adler, B.A., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. C. Pole, M.D., Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 
J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

and Clinical Medicine. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 
Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene. 

6 






St. Clair Spruill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, B.A., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. M. Craigiiill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Jas. A. Nydegger, M.A., M.D., Sc.D., Surg. U. S. P. H. Service, Professor of 
Tropica) Medicine. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Lecturer on Clin- 
ical Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, M.A., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Prof essor of Diseases of the Throat and 
Nose. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

T. L. Patterson, M.A., Associate Professor of Physiology, and Biology 

G. C. Lockard. M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Pedi- 
atrics. 

E. L. Whitney, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry, Phai- 
macology and Clinical Pathology. 

E. B. Freeman, S.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

William Caspari, Jr., Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Materia Medica. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. Clement Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. E. Peterman, M.D., Associate in Ophtalmology and Otology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology and Assistant Gastro- 
Enterologist to the University Hospital. 

Isaac M. Macks, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate in Proctology. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Associate in Clinical Surgery. 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine and Pedi- 
atrics. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate in Clinical Surgery. 

J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate in Anatomy. 



Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Associate in Histology and Embryology. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

W. I. Messick, M.D., Associate in Therapeutics and Clinical Medicine. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

F. S. Lynn, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Henry Chandlee, M.D., Associate in Radiography. 
J. R. Abercro.mbie, M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
Frank VV. Keating, M.D., Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics. 
H. W. Stoner, M.D., Lecturer on Bacteriology. 
W. P. E. Wyse, M.D., Lecturer on Psychiatry. 
W. G. Queen, M.D., Lecturer on Osteology. 
H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Lecturer on Materia Medica. 

G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
H. C. Davis, M.D., Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
W. F. Sowers, M.D., Demonstrator of Histology and Embryology. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Demonstrator of Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

J. F. O'Mara, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

R. G. Willse, M.D. ; Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology and Pharmacology. 

George Murgatroyd, M.D., Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., Demonstrator of Surgery. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Demonstrator of Dermatology. 
L. W. Ketron, M.D., Demonstration of Dermatology. 
J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
F. J. Kirby, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
W. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Fred Rankin, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Milton P. Hill, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

John G. Jeffers, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 
S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Christian Deetjen, M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 
S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 
J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 
L. H. Douglas, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
H. J. Walton, M.D., Instructor in Radiography. 
W. H. Daniels, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

8 



George E. Bennett, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Instructor in Ophthalmology and < >tology. ^ 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Leo Karlinsky, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

S. A. Bain, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. . 

Maurice Lazenby, A. B., M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

E. G. Marr, M.D., Assistant in Laryngology and Rhinology. 

J. E. Brumback, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Wm. L. Byerly, M.D., Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

H. L. Kolseth, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. D. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

R. E. Abell, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Surgeons. 

Prop. Randolph Winslow Prop. Frank Martin 

Prop. Arthur M. Shipley Prop. J. D. Blake 

Prop. Ridgely B. Warfield Prop. St. Clair Spruill 

Clin. Prof. Nathan Winslow 

Attending Physicians. 
Prop. Charles W. Mitchell Prop. Harry Adlbr 

Prop. John C. Hemmeter Prof. Charles O'Donovan 

Prof. David Streett Prop. J. M. Craighill 

Prof. Ernest Zueblin Prof. Jos. E. Gichner 

Prof. Gordon Wilson Prop. Charles W. McElfresh 

Attending Gynecologists. 

Prof. Thomas A. Ashby Prof. W. B. Perry 

Prof. J. Mason Hundley 

Attending Obstetricians. 
Prof. L. E. Neale Prop. J. M. H. Rowland 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 
Prop. Hiram Woods Prof. J. Frank Crouch 

Attending Laryngologists. 

Prof. Samuel K. Merrick Prof. John R. Winslow 

Clin. Prof. R. H. Johnston 

Attending Proctologist. 
Prof. G. Milton Linthicum. 

Attending Orthopedist. 
Prof. R. Tunstall Taylor. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Prop. Irving J. Spear. 

Attending Geni to -Urinary Surgeons. 

Prof. Gideon Timberlake Clin. Prof. Page Edmunds 

Associate A. J. Underbill 

Attending Pathologists. 
Prop. Jose L. Hirsh Associate, H. J. Maldeis 

Attending Radiologists. 
Henry Chandleb, M D. H. J. Walton, M.D. 

10 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
William J. Coleman, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons 

H. A. Codington, M.D. Charles R. Edwards, M.D. 

Elmer Newcomer, M.D. T. McC. Davis, M.D. 

R. L. Johnson, M.D. Hugh E. Clark, M.D. 

Resident Physicians 

C. W. Rauschexbach, M.D. Claud B. Hicks, M.D. 

William M. Stahl, M.D. Bruce H. Guistwhite, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologists. 
James A. Duggan, M.D. Roland S. Clinton, M.D. 

Maternity Department 
H. M. Freeman, M.D., Chief Resident Obstetrician. 

Resident Obstetricians 
A. S. Coleman, M.D. Joseph F. Munnerlyn, M.D. 

Resident Pathologists. 
Alfred Mordecai, M.D. Eugene L. Horger, M.D. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS FOR 1914-1915. 

Louis A. Buie, A.B Georgia George R. Patrick North Carolina 

Louis Diener Virginia Alberto G. deQuevedo Cuba 

George H. Dorset Maryland M. Raskin Georgia 

F. F. Foard North Carolina Hickman Ray North Carolina 

N. B. Hendrix, A.M. South Carolina George W. Rice Maryland 

Robert B. Hill, M.A North Carolina J. D. Robinson, A.B North Carolina 

W. H. Jenkins Virginia Playford L. Rush Maryland 

Thomas S. Kean Man/land Louis W. Schreiber Maryland 

R. R. Kerkow West Virginia E. Howard Tonolla Maryland 

LeRoy Lewis South Carolina Bascom L. Wilson North Carolina 

J. Alexander Lipnick Maryland Mark V. Zieoi.er, A.B Maryland 

The total number of patients treated in the Hospital during the year 1913-14 
was 7144. 

11 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 

Rev. Roremt L. Wright, Superintendent. 



Visiting Staff. 
Surgeons. 



Prof. Randolph Winslow 
Prof. Arthur M. Shipley 
Prof. Ridgely B. Warfield 



Prof. Frank Martin 

Prof. John D. Blake 

Prof. St. Clair Spruill 



Nathan Winslow, M.D. 
J. C. Lumpkin, M.D. 



Prof. Charles W. Mitchell 
Prof. John C. Hemmeter 
Prof. David Streett 
Prof. Ernest Zueblin 
Prof. Gordon Wilson 



Associates. 



Physicians. 



H, C. Blake, M.D. 
A. G. Barrett, M.D. 



Prof. Harry Adler 

Prof. A. C. Pole 

Prof. Charles O'Donovan 

Prof. J. M. Craighill 

Prof. Jos. E. Gichner 



Prof. CnAS. W. McElfresh 



Associates. 
Thos. W. Keown, A.B., M.D. 

J. SOMERVILLE FlSCHER, A.B., M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. 



J. E. Brumback, M.D. 
Wm. T. Riley, M.D. 



Neurologists. 



Prof. Charles G. Hill 



Prof. Irving J. Spear 



J. Clement Clark. M.D. 



Associates. 



W. P. E. Wyse, M.D. 



J. Percy Wade, M.D. 



Prof. S. K. Merrick 



Larynqologists. 



Prof. John R. Winslow 



Prof. L. E. Neale 



Obstetricians. 



Prof. J. M. H. Rowland 



Gynecologists. 

Prop. Thomas A. Ashby Prop. W. B. Perry 

Pbop. J. Mason Hundley 

12 



E. H. Hayward, M.D 



Prop. Hiram Woods 



Associates. 
Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D. 

Ophthalmologists. 



S. H. Streett, S.B., M D. 



Prop. J. Frank Crouch 



H. E. Peterman, M.D. 



Associates. 
R. D. West, M.D. 



Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 



Proctologist. 
Prof. G. Milton Linthicum. 

Associate. 
John G. Jeffers, M.D. 

Radiologist. 
John Evans, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D. 



Urologists. 



W. B. Wolf, M.D 



Prof. Gideon Timberlake 



Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 



Pathologists. 



Assoc. Prof. H. R. Spencer 



X. D. C. Lewis, M. D. 



Chief of House Staff. 
John Evans, M.D. 

Resident Staff. 



J. B. Culverhouse, M.D. 
John S. Fbnby, M.D. 
Chas. C Ayres, M.D. 
Austin H. Wood, M.D. 



C. H. Douthirt, M.D. 
W.m. B. Blanchard, M.I >. 
C. A. Young, M.D. 
J. E. Dull, M.D. 



13 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, B.A., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D. Resident Surgeon and Superintendent. 

W. B. Hunter, M.D., Assistant Surgeon. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Dispensary Surgeon. 

Miss M. M. Taylor, R.N., Head Nurse. 

Miss Ada B. Mosby, Principal of School. 

Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atkinson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
Frank Martin, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, M.D. Richard H. Johnston, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake, M.D. 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

L. McLane Tiffany, M.D. W. S. Halsted, M.D, 

Randolph Winslow, M.D. J. M. T. Finney, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, M.D. Charles W. Mitchell, M.D. 

William S. Thayer, M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 

John N. Mackenzie, M.D. 

14 






STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITALS AT BAYVIEW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

Milton C. Winternitz, A.B., M.D., Pathologist. 

Consulting Staff. 

Ophthalmologist. 
James J. Mills, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

Otologist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 
Edward H. Richardson, M.D. Hugh W. Brent, M.D. 

Urologists. 
Gideon M. Timberlake, M.D. John T. Geraghty, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. A. Strobel, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 



15 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O' Donovan, A.M., M.D. P. F. Martin, M.D. 

Eugene H. Hayward, M.D. J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank Martin, M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

R. B. Warfield, M.D. 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Pathologists. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. G. C. Lockard, M.D. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
John A. Maxwell. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

Prof. L. E. Neale 
Prof. J. M. H. Rowland, Obstetricians. 

Associates. 
J. K. B. E. Seegar. M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, M.D 

Resident Obstetrician. 
W. D. R. Brandon, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

S. R. Clark, M.D., L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic. 

W. G. Clopton, M.D., Edward Kerr, M.D., Assistants. 



16 



John G. Jay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery. 
R. P. Bay, M.D., Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Assistant Chiefs of Clinic. 
Fred Rankin, M.D., Thos. L. Phillips, M.D., R. E. Abell, M.D., Assist- 
ants. 

G. C. Lockard, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Pediatrics. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D. Assistant Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., J. R. Wanner, M.D.,. Assistants. 

H. W. Brent, M.D., W. K. White, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willse, 
M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 
E. A. Looper, M.D., W. G. Queen, M.D., Assistants. 

J. R. Abercrombie, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., L. W. Ketron, M.D., Assistants. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Stomach. 
J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Assistant. 

R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Assistant. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the 

Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 
Walter S. Niblett, M.D., Assistant. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Geniio-Urinary Diseases. 
A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Wm. L. Byerly, M.D., Assistant. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

George M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Assistants. 

J. Milton Linthicum M.D., Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 
3. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Clinic. 

Mr. A. D. Johnson, Secretary to the Dean and Superintendent of College Build- 
ings 



17 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 
Robert L. Blake, M.D., Dispensary Chief. 

Medicine. 
John S. Fischer, A.B., M.D., T. W. Keown, M.D. J. R. Brumback, M.D. 

Surgery. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., H. L. Kolseth, M.D., J. D. Bubert, M.D. 

Nose, Throat and Chest. 
Geo. W. Murgatroyd, M.D. E. G. Marr, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 

Prof. Charles O'Donovan 
J. L. Fischer, A.B., M.D. W. H. Daniels, M.D. 

Dermatology. 
Edgar R. Strobel, M.D. Samuel A. Bain, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

Sidney H. Streett, M.D. J. M. Fenton, M.D. 

Eugene Hayward, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Sidney M. Cone, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. R. D. West, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. F. W. Hobleman, M.D. 

Proctology. 
Prof. G. Milton Linthicum John G. Jeffers, M.D. 



18 






MATRICULATES FOR 1913-1914. 



POST GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Name State 

William Henry Ayler Maryland 

Harry Raymond Broll Maryland 

George Smith Condit, M.D Pennsylvania 

Wm. E. Fahrney, M.D Virginia 

F. J. Fisher 

William George Gillson New Jersey 

Thos. Brantley Henderson, M.D Virginia 

Jamil F annus Lahum Palestine 

Epifanio Lo Porto New York 

Robert J. Maresca New Jersey 

Joaquin Mayoral Cuba 

William Archibald Morris New York 

A. J. Ortiz Porto Rico 

Bruce Woody Rutrough Virginia 

Wm. C. Chowning, M.D Florida 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Agneav, John Robert New York 

Armstrong, Charles Wallace North Carolina 

Ayres, Charles C ■. Maryland 

Balart-Cros, Antonio Cuba 

Barber, Yates M Virginia 

Baynes, Ralph Henry North Carolina 

Bernstein, Frederick ." New York 

Bishop, George William, A.B Maryland 

Blake, Loayrie Wilson South Carolina 

Blanchard, William B Connecticut 

Bogart, Clark Stetson Pennsylvania 

Bradley, Theron Robert, Ph.G New York 

Brandon, William David Rockwell North Carolina 

Brogden, James Chester, A.B South Carolina 

Brotman, Morton M New Jersey 

Byers, Horace Wellington North Carolina 

Caldwell, John C South Carolina 

Casilli, Arturo New York 

Casler, Frank Glen West Virginia 

Chenoweth, B. Moffett West Virginia 

Church, Frederick E Massachusetts 

Clark, Haynsavorth D Florida 

Clark, Hugh E _. Virginia 

Clinton, Roland S North Carolina 

Cobleigh, Harry R. C Massachusetts 

Coleman , Alexander C Georgia 

Coltrane, John Wilborn North Carolina 

Cook, E. LeCompte Maryland 

19 



Namb State 

Councill, Wilford A. Hall Virginia 

Cremin, Lawrence Dennis New York 

Crist, George Bruce Maryland 

Culverhouse, John Burnett Massachusetts 

Dailey, Gilbert L Pennsylvania 

D'Angelo, Benedetto F New Yorfc 

Davis, Theodore McC ann South Carolina 

Denny, Walter L.,_Jr Maryland 

Dobson, James Furman South Carolina 

Douthirt, Crawford Haywood North Carolina 

Dovell, Chauncey Elmo Virginia 

Dull, James Earle Pennsylvania 

ECHEVERRIA Y MORA, JOSE RAMON Cvba 

English, John Matthew Francis Rhode Island 

Esslinger, Richard I., Phar. D Maryland 

Fenb y, John Smith Maryland 

Gannon, Clarence L New York 

Gennell, Ernest New Jersey 

Gillson, Hugh Vincent, A.B New York 

Glover, Victor Leslie West Virginia 

Grant, H. Clifford North Carolina 

Grazier, George Garland Pennsylvania 

Guistwhite, Bruce H Pennsylvania 

Guzman, Manuel, Jr Porto Rico 

Hablisjton, Charles Carroll, Phar. D Maryland 

Hassell, Cecil S North Carolina 

Henderson, Clair Crouse North Carolina 

Hicks, Claud B., A.B North Carolina 

Hoak, Warner H Pennsylvania 

Hoke, Clarence C, A.B., A.M Maryland 

Holstein, Aaron Louis New Jersey 

Horger, Eugene Leroy, A.B South Carolina 

Johnson, Raymond Lovejoy, Ph.G Florida 

Katzenberger, James Wesley, A.B Missouri 

Levin, Morris Benjamin , Maryland 

Lewis, Nolan D.C Pennsylvania 

Liggett, Bayard Lee, M.D West Virginia 

Limbaugh, Louie Mixson Florida 

Love, Samuel Glenn. . t South Carolina 

Lutz, John Francis, A.B Maryland 

Lynch, George Boyce North Carolina 

McFadden, Albert D Alabama 

McKinne y, Harold Napoleon North Carolina 

McLellan, William Edwin Massachusetts 

Magruder, Charles L Maryland 

Metcalfe, Challice Haydon Maryland 

Miller, Byron Y Vermont 

Mooers, Harold Alonzo District- of Columbia 

Mordecai, Alfred North Carolina 

Munnerlyn, Joseph Francis, A.B South Carolina 

Nance, Fuller Maryland 

Norment, Richard Baxter, Jr Maryland 

O'Neill, John Charles Connecticut 

Ostro, Marcus Delaware 

Pinto , Nicholas W New Jersey 

Portuondo, Albert L Cuba 

Pushkin, Benjamin Maryland 

Rice, William Frederick North Carolina 

Richards, Walter L Maryland 

Rieger, Ernest M. G New York 

20 



Name State 

Roman-Benitez, Manuel Porto Roco 

Romeu, Ernesto Porto Rico 

Saadeh, Nejib Abbas Syria 

Sarinas, Faustino Philippine Islands 

Schapiro, Abraham Pennsylvania 

Schaun, Paul Edward Maryland 

Schnuck, Harry Maryland 

Smith, Marcus Duke Maryland 

Stahl, William Martin Connecticut 

Stapleton, W. Pierce New Jersey 

Stein, Harry Maryland 

Stephens, 'Charles M Pennsylvania 

Stewart, Emmet James Maryland 

Susaki, Jirakichi, M.D Japan 

Timanus, George Loutrell Maryland 

Tolleson, Clarence C .Arizona 

Troxler, Raymond M North Carolina 

Updike, Ernest H West Virginia 

Vinson, Porter Paisley, B.S., M.A North Carolina 

Walsh, William S Rhode Island 

Wanner, Jesse R Maryland 

Warner, Howard Hoge Maryland 

Whitesides, W. Carl South Carolina 

Williams, David Tressler Virginia 

Wilkinson, Vernon Stevens Maryland 

Wilson, Frank Minium Maryland 

Wilson, Frank W North Carolina 

Wood, Austin H Pennsylvania 

Young, Charles A Maryland 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Anderson, Franklin B Maryland 

Armstrong, Ralph H Pennsylvania 

Arnold, J. Bruce, Jr Maryland 

Bailin, Robert New York 

Benard, Alberto, A.B Nicaragua 

Bennett, J. A Virginia 

Blackmer, Jocelyn William A r orth Carolina 

Braverman, Abraham Maryland 

Bridgers, Harvey C North Carolina 

Bridges, William Arthur, B.S North Carolina 

Buie, Louis Arthur, B.A South Carolina 

Burleson, William Brown North Carolina 

Byrnes, Thomas Eusebius Massachusetts 

Calladine, Thomas M., Jr New York 

Childs, Charles Chapin New York 

Clinkscales, Reuben Calhoun South Carolina 

Cohen, Ralph Washington, D. C. 

Cohn, Charles A., D.D.S .Pennsylvania 

Condon, Vernon H Maryland 

Crook, Charles S , Maryland 

Demarco, Vincent Mississippi 

Diebolder, Oscar Andrew Germany 

Diener, Louis .\ . • Virginia 

Dominguez, Thomas Porto Rico 

Dorsey, George Hamilton Maryland 

Downey, J. Frank Massachusetts 

Durkin, Patrick A •. Rhode Island 

21 



Name State 

Ebt, John Cyril, Phar. D Maryland 

Egan, Michael Joseph, Jr Georgia 

Ellner, David r New York 

English, Samuel M Pennsylvania 

Etzler, Dorset Paul Maryland 

Flickinger, William H Pennsylvania 

Floyd. F. F North Carolina 

Foard, Frederick T., Jr North Carolina 

Fritz, Gustav A Maryland 

Gagnon, Arthur J Rhode Island 

Garrido, Manuel Porto Rico 

Gatsopoulos, Peter N Massachusetts 

Gilbert, Harry Jesse New Jersey 

Gillett, Harold E New York 

Ginsbtjbq, Jacob B Maryland 

Goldman, Harry Maryland 

Gonzalez, Carlos Porto Rico 

Gordy, Lyle Leland Maryland 

Greenberg, S. H California 

Grossman, Louis W Pennsylvania 

Hay, Edward F Pennsylvania 

Hendrix, Nevins Byford, A.B., A.M South Carolina 

Higgins, Gerald Leo New Jersey 

Hill, Robert Burns, B.P., M.A North Carolina 

Hughes, Samuel S North Carolina 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland 

Jenkins, Ralph H Maryland 

Jenkins, William H Virginia 

Jenrette, Wendell Vivien North Carolina 

Johnson, Robert W South Carolina 

Johnson, Willie Robert South Carolina 

Jones, Milton E Maryland 

Justice, J. I West Virginia 

Kelley, Bernard Richard Connecticut 

Kerkow, Roy Robinson Washington, D. C 

Krantz, Herman Warner Connecticut 

Labares, Gregory, A. B Philippine Islands 

Lackey, Franklin Harris North Carolina 

Lane , Edgar Winslow, B. S North Carolina 

Lanich, Lloyd J Pennsylvania 

Lewis, LeRoy South Carolina 

Linhardt, Oscar V Maryland 

Lipnick, J. Alexander Maryland 

Lowry, John A. B North Carolina 

McCullough, Kenneth Delaware 

McGuffie, Charles R West Virginia 

McKenna, William H Rhode Island 

McReynolds, A. E Illinois 

M achin, Frank Herman Maryland 

Massa.net, Carlos L New York 

Maxwell, John A., A.B Connecticut 

Mellor, Royal B Maryland 

Merkel, Henry Anton Maryland 

Meyers, Lloyd R Pennsylvania 

Miller, William Cleveland Pennsylvania 

Moffett, Daniel Bruce, A.B Alabama 

Morrow, Thomas Lacy North Carolina 

Moses, Charles Howard Pennsylvania 

Myers, Charles W Pennsylvania 

Mybbs, M. W Maryland 

22 



Name State 

Naumann, Albert A Massachusetts 

Neale, Vivian J Maryland 

O'Neill, Joseph T Massachusetts 

Patrick, George R ." North Carolina 

Pinkerton, Frank Coulson Virginia 

Pole, Charles A Maryland 

Porter, Lyman R Man/land 

Prickett, Clarence J West Virginia 

de Quevedo, Alberto Garcia Porto Rico 

Raskin, Moses Georgia 

Ray, Hickman North Carolina 

Rice, George William Maryland 

Riordan, Arthur Hatton Massachusetts 

Robinson, John Daniel, A.B North Carolina 

Ross, George P Maryland 

Rothrock, Walter Roswell Pennsylvania 

Ruark, William Thomas North Carolina 

Rush, Playford L Maryland 

Sanders, Lucius Carl South Carolina 

Scher, Isidor Nero York 

Schreibeb, Louis Walter Maryland 

Scimeca, Salvatore New York 

Sh afer, Ralph Maryland 

Shannon, Samuel Dennison Maryland 

Sharkey, Myles Bernard New York 

Shipley, Frank E., A.B Maryland 

Sim a, Charles Edward Maryland 

Sloan, William Henry, B.S North Carolina 

Snyder, Samuel Pennsylvania 

Stern, Max E New York 

Street, Russell Barber Connecticut 

Stringer, John Thomas Virginia 

Studebaker, David Clemington Pennsylvania 

Tonolla, E. Howard Maryland 

Umpierre^ Ramon C Porto Rico 

Van Poole , C arl M North Carolina 

Waff, Joseph Judson, B.S Virginia 

Warner, Theodore Blanchard Maryland 

White, Clarence S West Virginia 

Williams, William F., Jr Maryland 

Wilson, B ascom L North Carolina 

Woodland, John C, Phar. D Maryland 

De Yoanna, Alfred Aurelius New York 

Db Yoanna, Saverio Aurelio New York 

Zeller, Eugene Joshua Karl Maryland 

Ziegler, Mark Victor, A.B Maryland 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Alvarez, Jose A Porto Rico 

Arne8t, Richard Turberville Virginia 

Baldwin, Anton, Jr Maryland 

Bennett, Percival Robert North Carolina 

Benson, Edward Hayes Maryland 

Bicki.ey, William Ernest, A.B South Carolina 

Birely, Lewis Adam Maryland 

Bishop, Everett Lassiter, B.S Georgia 

Blumberg, Jacob New York 

B01 en, Henry L Massachusetts 

Bovvden, George Abner Maryland 

23 



Name 8tat« 

Brat, Thomas Latham North Carolina 

Brooke, Chari.es Robert Maryland 

BBOWNi Thomas E Pennsylvania 

Brumbaugh, Benjamin B., Phak. D Maryland 

Burton, Charles Hammon Maryland 

Campo, Tony R New York 

Carrasquillo, Honorio F Porto Rico 

Cavello, Michael E New York 

Chandler, James Jennings, A .B South Carolina 

Cole, Lewis F New York 

Cudd, James E., A.B South Carolina 

Davidson, William B Rhode Island 

Davis, Philip Du Mond New York 

Day, Samuel Thomas, Jr New Jersey 

Dillon, William J Massachusetts 

Dooley, George Edward Connecticut 

Evans, John E., A.B South Carolina 

Eyestone, Fred L Ohio 

Feinglos, Israel Maryland 

Ferneyhough, Willie Todd Virginia 

Ferry, Bernard J Pennsylvania 

Folk, Robert Hamilton, A.B South Carolina 

Glatzau, Lewis W Pennsylvania 

Grant, David Swain North Carolina 

Growt, Bowers H Louisiana 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Jr Florida 

Gwtnn, Humphrey Wilson Florida 

Hammer, Howell I., Ph.G Maryland 

Hammond, Harry Howard New York 

Hanigan, S. Roscoe Pennsylvania 

Hawn, Albert Gaither North Carolina 

Hennessy, Jay Tyrrell New York 

Herrington, D. J., Ph.G North Carolina 

Hodges, Henry Stuart North Carolina 

Hutton, Daniel C North Carolina 

Jacobson, Benard S Maryland 

Jarman, Alonzo Russell North Carolina 

Knapp, Lee Henry New Hampshire 

Knowles, J. R Maryland 

Laplanche, Ernest R Maryland 

Lay, Juan Alfonso Cuba 

Lazenby, Allen D Maryland 

Light, Ellsworth Emmett Massachusetts 

Long, Clark Samuel Pennsylvania 

Lovely, Bernard Henry New Hampshire 

Low8ley, Augustus S California 

McCamey, Kenneth Ewing Pennsylvania 

Marino, Frank Christian Maryland 

Mason, Frank Ebaugh Maryland 

Mayo, Woodward B Utah 

Mejias, Francisco J Porto Rico 

Melroy, Raymond Shields Pennsylvania 

Michael, Marion Harlan Maryland 

Miller, John E Vermont 

Mitchell, Edward Kellers South Carolina 

Mitchell, Henry Stanley Maryland 

Nevuing, A. Boynton Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Frank P New York 

Nicklas, John M Maryland 

Noell, Robert Holman North Carolina 

24 



Name State 

O'Brien, J. Gerald Maryland 

Oddo, Vincent Massachusetts 

Oduber, Jacob Dutch West Indies 

O'Malley, William F New York 

Pasuth, Bartholomew Charles Connecticut 

Pay aval, Juan L Philippine Islands 

Penabaz, Jose A. Fernandez, A.B Cuba 

Penabaz, Fernando, A.B Cuba 

Phillips, Elmer Thomas Ohio 

Pruitt, Samuel O., A.B South Carolina 

db Quevbdo-Rios, Manuel Garcia Porto Rico 

Reier, Adam William Maryland 

Reifschneidbr, Charles Adam Maryland 

Rever, William B Maryland 

Rigby, Cecil, B.S South Carolina 

Roberts, Joseph John Connecticut 

Rogers, Herbert W Virginia 

Rolenson, Julio R Porto Rico 

Ruzicka, F. Frederick, A.B Maryland 

Santos-Buch, Angel M Cuba 

Savannah, Joseph G New Jersey 

Shaffer, Stewart S Pennsylvania 

Sharpe, Horace W .• New York 

Short, Noah H West Virginia 

Sosa, J. C., Jr Porto Rico 

Stein, Harry Milton New Jersey 

Strandberg, Herbert Lawrence New Jersey 

Taylor, Alfred Charles West Virginia 

Thomas, Edward Philip Maryland 

Thompson, Edwin Brice Ohio 

de Veer, Gerard, Jr Dutch West Indies 

Voss, Norwood Warner, A.B Maryland 

Wbllman, Harrison M Pennsylvania 

Whittle, William Oscar Virginia 

Yaffe, Benjamin M Maryland 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Albert, Arthur Clinton West Virginia 

Alegre-Carbo, Pablo, Ph.G Cuba 

Armstrong, Fred F Connecticut 

Arrillaga, Carlos Porto Rico 

Audet, Charles Henky Massachusetts 

Ayd, Joseph Michael Maryland 

Ayon, Rafael Nicaragua 

Bampfield, Fred J Canada 

Barishaw, Samuel New Jersey 

Bocanbgra-Lopez, Eufemio N Porto Rico 

Bonner, Octavius Blanchard North Carolina 

Bristow, Charles Oliver South Carolina 

Bronushas, Ipolitas B Maryland 

Burrows, Ernest Massachusetts 

Carlin, Edward J. M New Jersey 

Carroll, Harry Roland Maryland 

Cooper, Frank Hamilton Washington 

Coulon, Frank N New Hampshire 

Covey, William Crocket West Virginia 

Crawford-Frost, John Ings Maryland 

Crothbrs, John Christie Maryland 

Cubsta, Manuel, A.B Mexico 

25 



Name Statu 

D alton, William Burnett North Carolina 

Darby, William Arthur Maryland 

Daves, John Thomas Virginia 

Dillon, William M New York 

Dotle, Joseph Francis New Hampshire 

Duffy, Vincent Paul West Virginia 

Easter, Clay Miller Rust Virginia 

Eisenberg, Albert Maryland 

Ephraim, Myer Maryland 

Fay, Daniel Edgar Maryland 

Fazenbaker, Anderson Johnson Maryland 

Fernandez-Garcia, Luis Jorge Porto Rico 

Frost, Nugent George Massachusetts 

Giesen, John Jacob Virginia 

Gleason, John Louis Connecticut 

Hays, Harry Warren West Virginia 

Hedrick, Erlond H West Virginia 

Holmes, James Maryland 

Houde, Arthur J Massachusetts 

Huff, Wheeler O Maryland 

Isaacs, Raphael Harris Maryland 

Kaufman, Edgar Wayne Pennsylvania 

Kennedy, George Francis Massachusetts 

Leiva, Carlos Esteban Cuba 

Lockridge , Raymond Bedfort West Virginia 

McCormick, J. B New York 

M acGregor, Allan W Connecticut 

Martin, John Willis Maryland 

Martinez-Rodriguez, Jose .Porto Rico 

Meech, Samuel W .Maryland 

Merrick, Frank X Pennsylvania 

Miller, Daniel Maryland 

Moran, Arthur Bernard Connecticut 

Morgan, Zachariah Raphael Maryland 

Morisey, Raymond Faison North Carolina 

Mulcahy, Francis J Massachusetts 

Muniz, Felix R m Jr Porto Rico 

Murray, Fenwick Hall Maryland 

Nagournez, Leon New York 

N athanson, Wolf I New York 

Nolan, Francis Fabian Virginia 

Norris, J. Edward Maryland 

Ogden, Frank Nevin Maryland 

Peeler, Casper Smith, B.S Florida 

Porro, Adalberto C Cuba 

Porterfield, Marvin H West Virginia 

Power, Maurice J Massachusetts 

Reddig, Clarence Mansfield, Ph.B Pennsylvania 

Reitzel, Elbert Coy North Carolina 

Reynolds, Paul Emerson Maryland 

Rigau, Gabriel Porto Rico 

Rodriguez, Antonio, Jr Porto Rico 

Russell, Frank J Maryland 

Scull, Edmund Smith Virginia 

Shayte, Louis ^ Maryland 

Silverbtein, Max New Jersey 

Skilling, John Galen Maryland 

Smith, Leroy Henry Maine 

Sorin, Israel C New Jersey 

Stein, Albert Massachusetts 

26 



Name State 

Tarkington, Grayson E Arkansas 

Thomas, Kelly Clifton North Carolina 

Thonbr, John George West Virginia 

Van Kirk, William West Virginia 

Vauqhan, George Washington Maryland 

Weaver, Edward Fern, A.B Maryland 

Welch, Robert S. G Maryland 

Wheeler, Howard Lawrence Maryland 

Whistler, Edward Livingston, A.B Pennsylvania 

White, George Lawrence Maryland 

Wolff, Carl Otto, A.B North Carolina 

Wolford, Roy Azariah West Virginia 

Woltz, Charles Roderick Virginia 

Wood, James Russell North Carolina 

Worrell, Churchill Freeman Virginia 

Yost, Ernest Lee West Virginia 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1913-1914. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 195 

School of Medicine 472 

Department of Law 452 

Dental Department 179 

Department of Pharmacy 76 

Training School for Nurses 85 

Total 1459 



GRADUATES JUNE 1, 1914. 



John Robert Agnew New York 

Charles Wallace Armstrong.. North Carolina 

Ch/.rles Carlin Ayres Maryland 

Antonio Balart y Cros Cuba 

Yates Middleton Barber Virginia 

Ralph Henry Baynes North Carolina 

George William Bishop Maryland 

Lowrie Wilson Blake South Carolina 

William B. Blanch ard Connecticut 

Clark Stetson Bogart Pennsylvania 

Theron Robert Bradley New York 

William David Rockwell Brandon 

North Carolina 

James Chester Brogden South Carolina 

Morton Maier Brotman New Jersey 

Horace Wellington Byers ... .North Carolina 

John Cabeen Caldwell South Carolina 

Arturo Casilli New Jersey 

Haynsworth Dowling Clark Florida 

Hugh Edgar Clark Virginia 

Roland Smith Clinton North Carolina 

Alexander Stuart Matheson Coleman 

Georgia 

Everett Le Compte Cook Maryland 

Wilford A. Hall Councill Virginia 

Lawrence Dennis Cremin New York 

George Bruce Crist Maryland 

John Burnett Culverhouse . . . .Massachusetts 

Gilbert Lagoria Dailey Pennsylvania 

Benedetto Francis D'Angelo New York 

Walter L. Denny, Jr Maryland 

Theodore McCann Davis South Carolina 

James Furman Dobson South Carolina 

Cranford Haywood Douthirt Maryland 

C. Elmo Dovell Virginia 

J. Earle Dull Pennsylvania 

Jose Ramon Echeverria y Mora Cuba 

John Mathew Francis English. .Rhode Island 

Richard I. Ess' inger Maryland 

John Smith Fenby Maryland 

Hugh Vincent Gillson New York 

Victor Leslie Glover West Virginia 

H. Clifford Grant North Carolina 

George G. Grazier Pennsylvania 

Bruce Hetrick Guistwhite Pennsylvania 

Charles Carroll Habliston Maryland 

Cecil Starke Hassell North Carolina 

Clair Crouse Henderson North Carolina 

Claude Bernard Hicks North Carolina 

Clarence Calvin Hoke Maryland 



Aaron Louis Holstein New Jersey 

Eugene Leroy Horger South Carolina 

Raymond Lovejoy Johnson Florida 

James Wesley Katzenberger. Missouri 

Morris Benjamin Levin Maryland 

Nolan D. C. Lewis Pennsylvania 

Bayard Lee Liggett West Virginia 

Louie Mixson Limbaugh Florida 

Samuel Glen Love South Carolina 

John Francis Lutz Maryland 

George Boyce Lynch North Carolina 

Charles Lowe Magruder Maryland 

Challice Haydon Metcalfe Maryland 

Byron Y. Miller Vermont 

Alfred Mordecai North Carolina 

Joseph F. Munnerlyn Soxith Carolina 

Albert David McFadden Alabama 

William Edwin McLellan Maryland 

Fuller Nance Maryland 

Richard Baxter Norment, Jr Maryland 

John Charles O'Neill Connecticut 

Marcus Ostro Delaware 

Nicholas William Pinto New Jersey 

Benjamin Pushkin Maryland 

Will F. Rice North Carolina 

Walter Leland Richards Maryland 

Ernesto Romeu Ortiz Porto Rico 

Najib Alfred Saadeh Syria 

Faustino Sarinas y Del Rqsario 

Philippine Islands 

Abraham Schapiro Pennsylvania 

Marcus Duke Smith Maryland 

William Martin Stahl Connecticut 

Harry M. Stein Maryland 

Charles Manfred Stephens Pennsylvania 

Emmet James Stewart Maryland 

George Loutrell Timanus Maryland 

Clarence C. Tolleson •. . .Maryland 

Raymond Moody Troxler North Carolina 

Porter Paisley Vinson North Carolina 

William Sebastian Walsh Rhode Island 

Jesse R. Wanner Maryland 

Howard Hoge Warner Maryland 

William Carl Whitesides South Carolina 

David Tressler Wjlliams Virginia 

Frank Minium Wilson Maryland 

Frank W. Wilson North Carolina 

Vernon Stevens Wilkinson Maryland 

Austin H. Wood Pennsylvania 

Charles Augustus Young Maryland 



PRIZEMEN. 

University Prize — Gold Medal Theodore McCann Davis 



Mobris Benjanin Levin, 
Austin H. Wood, 



Certificates of Honor. 
William Sebastian Walsh. 

28 



Richard Baxter Norment, 
Porter Paisley Vinson, 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest institutions of medical education in America, having been 
chartered in 1807, under the title of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land. 

Five years later, in 1812, by authority of the General Assembly 
of Maryland, the College of Medicine of Maryland was empowered 
to annex to itself three other colleges or faculties, viz: The Faculty 
of Divinity, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four faculties or colleges thus united were "constituted an 
University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

The Medical School of the University is thus its oldest department 
and ranks fifth, in point of age, among the medical colleges of the 
United States. 

Throughout the century of its existence it has always taken 
rank as one of the leading medical colleges of the South, and among 
the most widely known and most highly honored of the schools 
of medicine of the country. 

Beginning with the modest number of five, composing the first 
graduating class in 1810, the list of graduates in medicine of the 
University of Maryland, now numbers six thousand and twelve 
names, drawn from all parts of the United States and from abroad, 
among which are to be found some of the most noted names con- 
nected with the history of medicine in our country. 

While from the foundation of the University of Maryland, the 
policy of the Faculty of Physic has been one of wise conservatism, 
it has, at the same time, never been behindhand in the march of 
educational progress, and while retaining for so long a time as they 
were of real value, those features of older educational methods which 
were wisest and best, they have often been first, and always among 
the first, in the adoption of all measures tending to improvement in 
methods of medical teaching, and to true elevation of the standard 
of medical education. 

29 



In illustration of this the following facts may be mentioned: 

It established one of the first Medical Libraries and the first Med- 
ical College Library in the country (1813). 

It was among the very first to provide for adequate clinical instruc- 
tion by the erection of its own hospital, available at all times for the 
use of students (1823). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland was the 
first medical school in America to make dissecting a compulsory 
part of the curriculum (1833). 

It was the first to give instruction in Dentistry (1837). 

It was among the first to meet the modern demand for instruction 
in specialties (1866). 

It was the first medical school in America to establish separate 
and independent chairs of Diseases of Women and Children (Jan- 
uary, 1867) and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

It was among the first to teach Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence 
(1883), 

It is the aim of the present Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland to carry out this policy established by its predecessors. 

With this end in view, the Faculty has, in the last few years, 
expended, and is now expending, large amounts in the establishment 
and equipment of its Lying-in Hospital, its Laboratories of Chemistry, 
Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, in the erection of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, which was completed in 1897, and in the erection of 
a new Laboratory Building, recently completed. 

By arrangement between the two institutions, The Baltimore 
Medical College, established thirty-two years ago and having over 
two thousand graduates, has been merged with the School of Med- 
icine of the University of Maryland. 

By this arrangement the members of the Faculty of this well 
known institution become teachers in the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland, which takes over the equipment of the 
Baltimore Medical College and succeeds to all the clinical privi- 
leges which it formerly enjoyed in a number of general and special 
hospitals, thereby greatly increasing and improving the facilities for 
instruction in all departments. 

All graduates of the Baltimore Medical College are now eligible 
for membership in the General Alumni Association of the University 
of Maryland. 

The Faculty is therefore in position to offer to students of medi- 
cine and graduates a course of combined didactic, clinical and labo- 

30 






ratory instruction which will compare favorably with that offered 
by any medical school in the United States. 

The details of this course will be found in the following announce- 
ment of the one hundred and eighth annual course of instruction 
of the School of Medicine of the University of Maryland. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

Throughout the entire period of existence of the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland, clinical teaching has always been 
a prominent and important feature in the course of instruction. 

The ownership and exclusive control by the Faculty of Physic of 
the University Hospital and the Maternity Hospital of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, the exclusive control of the clinical facilities in 
the Maryland General and Maryland Lying-in Hospitals, and the 
clinical privileges enjoyed by the University in the Presbyterian 
Eye. Ear and Throat Charity Hospital, the James Lawrence Kernan 
Hospital and Industrial School of Maryland for Crippled Children, 
the City Hospitals at Bay View, St. Vincent's Infant Asylum and 
other institutions for the care of the sick in and near the city, place 
the Faculty in a position to make unusually prominent this impor- 
tant feature of a medical course, and have enabled it to organize 
and carry into effect a system of thorough clinical teaching whereby 
each member of the several class sections is brought into direct 
personal contact with the cases under examination. 

In addition to the regular daily clinical lectures in the amphi- 
theater; much attention is given to this strictly bedside instruction. 

The students, in small classes, are required to accompany the 
physician or surgeon through the wards of the hospital, and are 
there trained in making diagnosis, in the dressing of wounds, the 
application of splints, plaster jackets and other appliances, and in 
the handling of the many instruments used in the diagnosis and 
treatment of disease. 

In the Dispensaries and Out-patient Departments, students have 
similar opportunities of familiarizing themselves with methods of 
diagnosis and treatment in the various specialties of medicine and 
surgery, and of observation of such cases as do not require confine- 
ment in bed. 

There is a separate building devoted to the out-patient depart- 

31 



ments of Medicine and Diseases of Children, and there are two 
obstetrical clinics with both ward and out-patient facilities. 

To the student of medicine the value of the training and encour- 
agement thus afforded him in habits of close and accurate obser- 
vation, of self-possession and self-reliance, in the future practice of 
his profession, can hardly be overestimated. 



HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training; School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in 
accommodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new 
and modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the former 
building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of- brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 
etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

32 



The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as a marine hospital for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institu- 
tion give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the oity 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The clinical service of this hospital is controlled exclusively by 
the University of Maryland. It is situated on Linden avenue, north 
of Madison street, is five stories in height, has a capacity of one 
hundred and sixty (160) beds, and is so arranged that patients may 
be brought from the wards directly before the class in the amphi- 
theater. This hospital contains patients suffering from almost every 
form of indigenous disease, and nearly every variety of injury. 
Special operating and dressing rooms are provided with sterilizers 
and all necessary surgical instruments, apparatus and appliances, 
including Roentgen ray for locating foreign bodies, examining bones, 
etc. Dressings and operations occupy a large portion of each day. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 

33 



ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

Three resident physicians are annually appointed to this hospital 
from among the graduates of the University. 

For purposes of instruction in this most important branch, the 
members of the Senior Class, after a course of instruction by the 
Demonstrator of Obstetrics on the manikin, are taken in sections of 
two students each, into the wards of the hospital, where, under the 
direct and immediate supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and 
his Chief of Clinic, they are thoroughly instructed in vaginal exami- 
nation and the antiseptic precautions to be taken in making such 
examination, abdominal palpation, the diagnosis of presentations, 
and in the treatment of pregnant women preparatory to labor. 
The sections of the graduating class are assigned in rotation to 
attend labor cases in the hospital, and arrangements are perfected 
whereby members of the section are summoned without delay at 
any hour when labor occurs. 

Students are thus afforded opportunities under the immediate 
supervision of the instructor to become familiar with the mechanism 
of labor in all its stages, and have frequent opportunities to witness 
the application of forceps, and the methods of treatment of the 
various complications of labor. Much attention is also paid to their 
instruction in the subsequent treatment of mother and child. 

The out-door clinic is thoroughly organized, and after instruction 
in the hospital, students of the graduating class are allotted to attend 
labor cases at the homes of patients, under supervision of the 
Professor of Obsetetrics, his Chief of Clinic, or either of the resident 
physicians of the Lying-in Hospital whenever complications or 
difficulties arise. Each student will be required to conduct and keep 
accurate record of at least ten confinement cases, under the super- 
vision of the attending physician. 

By this system of combined didactic, practical, and clinical meth- 
ods of teaching, students of this University are afforded opportunities 
for instruction in this most important branch of medical science 
which are equaled by very few other schools and surpassed by none. 

THE MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material which is under the control 
of the University of Maryland. There is an out-door clinic con- 

34 



nected with this hospital, which is well organized and is under the 
supervision of the Obstetrical Department of this school. 

Synopsis of the Reports of the Resident Physicians for the year ending May 1, 

1914. 

Number of Confinements in Hospitals 645 

Number of Confinements in Out-Door Department 1560 

Total 2205 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class, 40. 

THE CITY HOSPITALS. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities ' to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the City Hospi- 
tals, and the dead-house furnishes a great abundance and variety 
of pathological material, which is used for demonstration. 

The City Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds, 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds, 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which was founded in 1877, largely through the 
efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the largest 
special hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1913 there were admitted to the Dispensary and 
Hospital, 12,117 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains one hundred beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at " Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state and endowed beds and every mod- 
ern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as well as a most 
beautiful park-like environment and farm and is closely affiliated 
with the University of Maryland. 

35 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland by 
the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to pre- 
sent to its students liberal opportunities for the study of diseases 
of infants and children. 

MOUNT HOPE RETREAT FOR THE INSANE. 

This hospital contains an average of 1,000 patients, is attended 
by Prof. Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., of this faculty, and presents 
rare opportunities for the study of nervous and mental diseases. 

SOUTH BALTIMORE EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT CHARITY 

HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is situated in south Baltimore and has a large out- 
patient department devoted to Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. 

Dr. H. E. Peterman is visiting surgeon, and small groups of stu- 
dents are sent there for instruction in the above named diseases. 

MARYLAND ASYLUM AND TRAINING SCHOOLS FOR FEEBLE- 
MINDED. 

This hospital situated in the suburbs of Baltimore is owned and 
controlled by the State of Maryland. It contains 700 beds devoted 
to the treatment and training of the feeble minded and epileptics. 
Dr. Frank W. Keating is the superintendent and is Instructor in 
Psycho-Asthenics in the University of Maryland. Sections of the 
Fourth Year class are sent to this hospital for instruction in the 
proper care of feeble minded and epileptics. 

SPRING GROVE STATE HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is a state institution for the treatment of the insane. 
There are 750 beds. Dr. J. Percy Wade is superintendent. Stu- 
dents of this school may be sent to this institution for instruction 
in the diagnosis and treatment of mental diseases. 

SPRINGFIELD STATE HOSPITAL. 

This large state institution for the treatment of mental diseases 
is situated at Sykesville, Md. There are accommodations for 1300 
patients. Dr. J. Clement Clark, the superintendent, is also Asso- 
ciate Professor of Psychiatry in the University of Maryland. 

36 



UNIVERSITY DISPENSARY OR OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT. 

This department of the University Hospital furnishes a most 
abundant supply of material for clinical instruction. During the 
past year the number of visits made by patients to the various 
departments of the Dispensary was 29,239. 

The whole department is arranged and thoroughly organized to 
facilitate the classification of the patients coming under treatment 
and their distribution to the various professors giving clinical lectures. 

During the intervals between the sessions the regular clinics are 
continued in the amphitheater, and there is also, each day, a bedside 
clinic in the hospital and service in the Dispensary. It will thus be 
seen that the school offers unusual facilities for clinical study dur- 
ing its regular session, and that the continuance of the clinics during 
the year affords opportunity to such students and graduates as can 
spend their time in the city. 

Attention is called to the fact that during the intervals between 
the sessions, from June to October, students have the advantage of 
three hours of clinical instruction daily, between the hours of 11 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY. 

The Maryland General Hospital Dispensary treats 18,000 indigent 
patients annually, and supplies this school with an inexhaustible 
clinic for the instruction of its students. In the outdoor depart- 
ment of the dispensary, advanced students visit and treat patients 
at their homes, under the direction of the dispensary physician or 
his assistants. 

RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Accommodations are provided in dormitories adjacent to the hos- 
pital for resident students. To these are assigned wards in the 
hospital, with attendance upon the sick, under the daily supervision 
of the professors of the University and resident house officers. 
Special attention is called to the fact that in this institution under- 
graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of con- 
stant observation of the sick and of receiving daily bedside instruc- 
tion from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is 
the rule adopted, in order that the experience of the students may 
be as varied as possible. 



37 



LABORATORIES 



ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. 

This laboratory is in charge of Associate Professor Holland and 
his assistants. It occupies an entire floor of one of the labo- 
ratory buildings and has in addition a smaller room for section 
teaching. The University has recently built its own storage and 
embalming plant, which supplies an abundance of anatomical mate- 
rial. The museum affords a large collection of both wet and dry 
specimens which are used in teaching. There is also a considerable 
amount of material in comparative anatomy. Dissecting tickets 
must be countersigned as an evidence of satisfactory dissecting. 

Anatomical material is furnished in abundance free of charge. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of the Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry, aided by the Demonstrators. Each stu- 
dent during his course has assigned him a table and is fully supplied, 
with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of charge, except 
for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department. 

LABORATORY OF PRACTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped with the atest and most improved 
apparatus. 

Each student is trained to become familiar with the phenomena 
of life by objective and personal study. 

An abundant supply of material is provided for experiment and 
demonstration. 

The laboratory is also well adapted for post-graduate study and 
special research in Physiology, for which opportunity will be given 
under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteids as well as a detailed course in the 

38 



chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which may result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 
The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, will be 
given the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

This laboratory is equipped for teaching Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

There is a large collection of charts, specimens and apparatus used 
in teaching. The necessary equipment for the practice of technique 
is provided. 

LABORATORY OF PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 

The laboratory of Pharmacology and Materia Medica contains 
a complete museum of materia medica preparations including the 
crude drugs, preparations and active principles. 

The laboratory of pharmacology is provided with instruments and 
appliances for demonstrating the physiologic effects of drugs on 
animals. 

LABORATORY OF PATHOLOGICAL HISTOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

In addition to the opportunities which are afforded students for 
the study of gross pathology by the weekly lectures and demonstra- 
tions, and by attendance upon the autopsies at University and 
Bayview Hospitals, laboratory instruction is also given in Pathologi- 
cal Histology and Bacteriology, for which purposes the autopsies fur- 
nish an abundant supply of material. 

Ten hours weekly are devoted to this instruction, which is obliga- 
tory on all second- and third-year students. 

The course of instruction embraces the preparation and study of 
sections illustrating the common lesions of the various organs; the 
microscopic examination of urinary sediments; the various methods 
of isolating and identifying microorganisms, and the method of 
staining important microorganisms. 



Graduates and advanced students qualified to profit by such work, 
desiring to undertake special lines of investigation in this depart- 
ment, will be afforded excellent opportunities for study. 

LABORATORY OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped for the study of practical labo- 
ratory work in its relationship to clinical medicine. Each student 
is supplied with a locker, containing a microscope and sufficient 
apparatus for any ordinary examination. 

The wards and out-patient departments of the University and 
allied hospitals furnish an abundance of material for study. 

By reason of individual equipment, much work outside of class 
hours is expected of the student. 

The class room is adequately lighted, and is conveniently situ- 
ated for teaching purposes. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase from 
his widow of the collection of books of Dr. John Crawford, now 
contains 11,645 volumes, 45 current journals and several thousand 
pamphlets. During the year ending June 1, 1913, 905 volumes were 
added. It is open daily during the year, except in August, for the 
use of members of the Faculty, students and the profession gener- 
ally. Books may be taken out without charge by making a deposit 
of three dollars. It is well stocked with recent literature and the 
more commodious quarters acquired in Davidge Hall have promoted 
very much its growth and usefulness. 

Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (181,000 volumes), 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library (280,000 volumes) and the Library 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. The last named library 
receives the leading medical publications of the world and complete 
sets of many journals are available. 

The libraries are open to students of the Medical School without 
charge. 

The nearness of Washington puts the immense libraries of the 
national capital at the disposal of students of this school. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a separate apartment in the main build- 
ing. It is under the care of the curator, Prof. J. Holmes Smith 
and his assistants. It contains a large collection of anatomical prep- 

40 



arations, plaster casts, charts, models, etc., used in teaching anatomy. 
It contains also a number of specimens of comparative anatomy. 
There is a large collection of gross pathological specimens and cut 
sections mounted for demonstration. For the department of obstet- 
rics, there is an excellent collection of normal and abnormal human 
embryos. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Two monthly journals are published by the University. The 
University Gazette is devoted to the interests of the entire University 
and is published under the auspices of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation. The Hospital Bulletin is the publication of the Medical 
School. Dr. Nathan Winslow is editor. 

DENTAL INFIRMARY. 

The Dental Department of the University of Maryland is situated 
upon the University grounds, fronting on Greene Street, and adjoin- 
ing the building of the School of Medicine. 

Daily clinics are held in this department in the afternoon from 
2 to 5 o'clock, which are open to students of the School of Medicine, 
and offer excellent opportunities to students intending to practice 
in the country to familiarize themselves with dental operations. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

By arrangements recently concluded between the two institutions, 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, established in 1840, and widely 
and favorably known as one of the oldest and most prominent of 
the institutions of its kind in this country, has become the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, and now occupies 
buildings upon the University grounds. 

The lectures and laboratories in this Department will afford to 
students of the School of Medicine who expect to practice in the 
country, opportunities of acquiring a knowledge of correct methods 
of dispensing medicines which will be of much value in their future 
practice. 

Special courses of instructions in the laboratories of Pharmacy 
may be arranged for upon payment of a moderate fee. 

ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school. 

41 



TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons. 
Four Resident Physicians. 
Two Resident Gynecologists. 
Two Resident Pathologists. 

TO THE MATERNITY HOSPITAL. 

Three Resident Physicians. 

TO THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

One Chief of House Staff. 
Two Resident Physicians. 
Five Resident Surgeons. 
One Resident Obstetrician. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants. The fee for such hospital residence 
is one hundred and fifty dollars per year, payable in advance. This 
covers lodging, light and fuel. 

Many appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of the University of Maryland are 
eligible. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the beet general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination, or both, and is essential for admis- 
sion to any class. 

The requirements for the issue of the Medical Student Certificate 
are those prescribed by the rules of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, 
and comprise: 

(A) The completion of a standard four-year high school course, 
or its equivalent, and, in addition, 

(B) One year of college credits in chemistry, biology, physics 
and French or German. 

42 



' (A) THE HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENT. 

(1) A diploma and transcript of record from a fully accredited 
high school, normal school or academy requiring for admission evi- 
dence of the completion of a standard course in primary and inter- 
mediate grades and for graduation, the completion of a standard 
four-year high school course, embracing two years (2 units) of math- 
ematics, two years (2 units) of English, two years (2 units) of a 
foreign language, one year (1 unit) of American History and Civics 
and seven years (7 units) of further credit in language, literature, 
history or science, making the total of units at least fourteen; or, 

(2) An examination in the following branches totaling 14 units: 

(1) Required, 7 units. Unit*. 
Mathematics — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 3 years) Algebra and 

plane geometry 2 

English — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years) 2 

A Foreign Language — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years)... 2 

U. S. History 1 

Total required units 7 

(2) Elective, 7 units. To be selected from the following: 
English Language and Literature — (in addition to the required 

work) 1 to 2 

Foreign Language — additional Latin, German, French, Italian, 

Spanish or Greek (not less than one year in any one) 1 to 4 
Advanced Mathematics — advanced Algebra, Solid Geometry 

and Trigonometry (£ year each) 1 

Natural Science — Chemistry, 1 year; Physics, 1 year; Biology, 

Botany, Physiology, Zoology (5 to 1 year each) $ to 2 

Earth Science — Physical Geography, Geology, Agriculture (i 

to 1 year each) £ to 2 

Astronomy — (£ year) £ 

Drawing — (£ to 1 year) \ to 1 

History — Ancient, Medieval and Modern, English (1 year 

each) lto3 

Economics — (i year) \ 

Manual Training — (1 year) 1 

Book-keeping — (£ to 1 year) \ to 1 

One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subject for four 
or five periods per week for a year of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to be 
not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 2 semester 
credits or 2 points. 

(B) THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college year shall extend through one college 
session of at least thirty-two weeks of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. 

43 



b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college year shall be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man year in standard colleges and universities. 

Schedule 



SUBJECT 


LECTURES OR 

RECITATIONS 

PER WEEK 


LABORATORY 

PERIODS 

PER WEEK 


TOTAL HOURS 
PER 

SEMESTER 


TOTAL SEMES- 
TER HOURS 
PER YEAR 


Physics (1) 


2 

2 
2 or 3 
4 or 3 


2 

2 

2 or 1 


4 

4 

4 

4 or 3 


8 

8 

8 

8 or 6 


Chemistry (1) 

Biology (1) 


German or French (2) . . . . 


Total 


10 


6 or 5 


16 or 15 


32 or 30 



Each laboratory period must extend over at least two hours. 



Or, expressed in class hours 



TOTAL HOURS TOTAL HOURS 
LECTURES OR LABORATORY 
RECITATIONS WORK 



Physics (1). . . 
Chemistry (1) 



64 
64 



Biology (1) ! 64 or 96 



128 

128 

128 or 64 



TOTAL MINI- 
MUM HOURS 
DIDACTIC AND 
LABORATORY 



192 
192 

128 or 160 



German or French (2) 


128 or 96 




128 or 96 


Total 


320 


384 or 320 


704 or 640 







c. This preliminary college year shall include courses in phj r sics, 
chemistry, biology and German or French, each course to embrace 
at least eight semester hours of didactic and laboratory work in 
each subject as shown in the above schedule, provided that a student 
may satisfy the requirement of physics in presenting one unit of 
high school physics and completing a half year of college physics 
which continues and does not duplicate the work done in the high 
school. 

Provided also, that a student may satisfy the requirement of French 
or German by presenting two units of regular high school work in 
either language and completing a half year of college work in that 
language, which continues and does not duplicate the work done 
in the high school, or by presenting three units of regular high school 
work in French or German. 



44 



In the administration of the entrance requirements of the pre- 
liminary college year conditions may be allowed until September 
1917, amounting to not more than one-half of the requirement in 
physics and one-half of the requirement in a modern language. 

All such conditions shall be removed before registration for the 
second year. 

The evaluation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 
iner only, and all students whose entrance qualifications are not clearly 
satisfactory, or whose certificates are not complete, are advised to 
obtain from him or from the Dean blank forms on which to prepare 
a full statement of their previous education, in advance of their 
coming to Baltimore. Such statements to be submitted to the 
Entrance Examiner for his advice as to the course to be pursued. 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Otis, Hall 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 1211 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore. To him must be submitted the credentials of 
all applicants, and by him is issued the certificate upon which the 
student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 
medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 
ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course future difficul- 
ties may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, without 
being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance. 

PRE-MEDICAL COURSE. 

In order to meet the increased requirements for matriculation 
taking effect January 1, 1914, a special Pre-Medical Course in Chem- 
istry, Physics, Biology and French or German is now offered in 
St. John's College. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, is by contract 
of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's College 
and who have made an approved choice of electives may if they desire 
it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical School of the 

45 



University. If they successfully complete the work of the first med- 
ical year they are graduated with their class with the degree of A B. 
from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work of 
the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and for 
four years he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seven years the M.D. degree, but credit from the Med- 
ical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit has already 
been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica 
and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $125. 

STATUTES. 

1. Cards for completed courses will be issued by the Dean at the 
end of the session. Laboratory tickets and tickets for practical 
anatomy must be countersigned by the proper demonstrators and 
directors. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket will not be 
accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. Every candidate must have passed examinations in the vari- 
ous branches of medicine taught in this school, or show satisfactory 
evidence of having done so in other schools, and also produce evi- 
dence of satisfactory work in practical anatomy and the various 
laboratories. Attendance upon all clinical lectures is obligatory. 

3. Any student failing in more than one-half the yearly exami- 
nations shall be required to repeat the work of the year and shall not 
be allowed to advance with his class. Students deficient in less than 
one-half the year's work are permitted to make up their deficiency 
in the fall examinations. All students are required to stand the 
spring examinations unless excused by the Dean. No student will 
be permitted to enter the third-year class who has not completed all 
first-year work, and no student will be permitted to enter the fourth- 
year class who has not completed all second-year work, nor shall 

46 



a student be advanced from a lower to a higher class if he is con- 
ditioned in more than one major and one minor subject. 

4. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
treasurer before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

5. Examinations for the degree of Doctor of Medicine are con- 
ducted by the several professors. 

A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be charged the regular fees for tuition, etc., 
and will be required to repeat the entire course of the fourth year 
and to take examinations in such other branches as may be required, 
should be he permitted to again enter the school as a candidate for 
graduation. 

6. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his final 
examination. 

ANNUAL LIMITATION OF RULES AND FEES. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1915, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees and all 
the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year) $5 . 00 

Tuition fee (each year) 165 . 00 

Graduation fee 30. 00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, or 
for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases for 
materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the entire 
amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tuition 
fee for that year will be $160. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this insti- 
tution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning Octo- 
ber 1, 1914. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first full 
course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses, $25 each. 

47 



SCHOLARSHIPS. 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this Uni- 
versity, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, "to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year stu- 
dent only, who has successfully completed one year's work in the 
medical course, and no man may hold such scholarship for more than 
two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of inability 
to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Classes of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person -of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance. " 

48 



The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the 
Faculty of Physic to a student of the Senior Class who presents to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and that 
he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuition 
fee of that year. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in' Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of students' personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books 


$ 18 

"96 
48 
35 
10 


$ 32 

5 
112 
65 
50 
20 


$ 50 




10 




128 




80 




100 




75 






Total 


$207 


$284 


$443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Superinten- 
dent of buildings, who may be found at his office on the premises, 
will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts of students. 

For further information, apply to 

R. Dorsey Coale, Ph.D., Dean of the Faculty, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



49 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 



The following curriculum is the result of a recent and thorough 
revision of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialities in medicine and surgery- 
necessitates a very crowded course and the question of electives is one 
which very soon will be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under nine departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Chemistry including Physiological Chemistry. 

4. Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

5. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

6. Medicine (including Medical Specialities). 

7. Surgery (including Surgical Specialities). 

8. Obstetrics. 

9. Gynecology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Each year consists of thirty-two weeks and is divided into two 
semesters. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body and laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of teachers insures attention to the needs 
of each student. 

In many courses the final examinations as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 
largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work car- 
ried on throughout the course. 

60 



DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY INCLUDING HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

A. C. Pole, M.D Professor of Descriptive Anatomy 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D. ..Professor of Histology and Embryology 

J. W. Holland, M.D.... Associate Professor of Anatomy 

J. L. Wright, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D Associate in Histology and Embryology 

W. G. Queen, M.D., Lecturer on Osteology and Assistant in Histology and 

Embryology 

W. F. Sowers, M.D Demonstrator in Histology and Embryology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Assistant in Histology and Embryology 

Fred Rankin, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

R. E. Abell, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Anatomy. 

First Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. 

This course embraces the integuments, myology, angiology, oste- 
ology, syndesmology and the peripheral nerves. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in his 
work by competent demonstrators. Examinations are held at regu- 
lar intervals throughout the session, and each student will be held 
to strict account for material furnished him. 

Osteology. Two hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Lectures, 
demonstrations and recitations. Each student is furnished a skele- 
ton and a deposit is required to insure its return at the end of the 
session. 

Second Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. Lectures, recitations and conferences. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. This 
course includes topographical and applied anatomy of the body cav- 
ities and viscera and the cerebro-spinal and sympathetic nervous 
systems with special demonstrations of important subjects to the 
class in small sections. 

The teaching of anatomy is illustrated by means of charts, dia- 
grams, special dissections and the projection apparatus. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; six hours 
each week throughout the session. The most important part of the 

51 



work will be done in the laboratory, where each student will be 
provided with a microscope, apparatus, staining fluids and material 
necessary for the preparation of specimens for microscopical exami- 
nation. An important aid to the course is the projection microscope 
which is used for the projection upon a screen of magnified images 
of the specimens actually used in the laboratory. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; two hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick, 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryology. In the 
laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages of 
development, and sections of the chick at different periods of incu- 
bation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter part 
of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through dif- 
ferent regions of a mammal. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Physiology 

T. L. Patterson, M.A Associate Professor of Physiology and Biology 

C. C. Conser, M.D Associate in Physiology 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D Associate in Physiology 

First Year. 1. General Biology. This course is designed to serve 
as a practical introduction to the course in physiology and aims to 
acquaint the student with the elementary forms, forces, and laws 
of living nature upon which practically all medical science is depen- 
dent. First half year, lectures and conferences three hours a week. 
Laboratory four hours a week. Associate Professor Patterson and 
Mr. Bishop. 

2. Physiology. This course follows the course in General Biology 
and includes the physiology of blood, circulation, respiration, and 
a portion of the nervous system. Second half year, lectures and 
conferences three hours a week. Associate Professor Patterson. 

Second Year. 3. Advanced Physiology, Biochemistry and Bio- 
physics. This course covers the entire field of physiology in a series 
of lectures, recitations, demonstrations and conferences that is based 
upon an already acquired knowledge of the elements of this science 
as given under No. 1 and 2. The doctrines and theories of modern 
physiology as far as they give promise of fruitful development of 
this science are discussed and weekly conferences are held between 
the classes and the teacher. 

52 



It is impossible to itemize the various topics that are discussed 
in this course, only the more important can be mentioned, for ex- 
ample: the Ionic hypothesis — the theory of solutions (Vant Hoff— 
Arrhenius — J. H. Hamburger — DeVries) and its relation to biochem- 
istry. The theories of immunity (Metschnikoff — Ehrlich) — the tro- 
pisms especially — the doctrine of neuro-chemic coordination and its 
bearing to pharmaco-tropism, etc., etc., are made comprehensible to 
the student. Lectures and conferences three hours a week. Pro- 
fessor John C. Hemmeter assisted by Dr. Conser. 

4. Experimental Biophysics and Biochemistry. This is a purely 
Laboratory course in the dynamics of muscle and nerve, nervous 
system, circulation and respiration, digestion-metabolism, excretion, 
secretion, etc. The field covered is that as outlined in Hemmeter's 
Manual of Practical Physiology. Laboratory six hours a week for five 
months. Associate Professor Patterson, Drs. Conser, G. W. Hem- 
meter. 

5. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a Laboratory course 
intended for advanced Laboratory students (optional) who may wish 
to do special work in this line of physiology. Hours to be arranged. 
Associate Professor Patterson. 

6. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students will be 
admitted to the laboratory which is well adapted for .post-graduate 
study and special research. Hours will be arranged to suit individ- 
uals. Professor John C. Hemmeter. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

R. Dorset Coale, Ph.D., M.D Professor of Chemistry and Toxicology 

Daniel Bash, Ph.D Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D Associate in Chemistry 

First Year. General Chemistry and Toxicology. 1. Lectures and 
Recitations. Two hours per week throughout the session. 

A course of lectures and recitations upon inorganic chemistry, 
fully illustrated by experiments. Particular attention is paid to 
those elements and compounds which are used in medicine or are 
of a poisonous character. Professor Coale. 

2. Laboratory Work. Eight hours per week for one semester. 

Each student during his course has assigned him a table and is 
fully supplied with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of 
charge, except for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

53 



The course of instruction embraces: (1) Training in the proper 
care and use of apparatus and in the manipulative processes used 
in the laboratory. (2) The experimental study of the more impor- 
tant elements and compounds, and the repetition of experiments 
performed in the course of lectures. (3) Instruction in the elements 
of qualitative analysis. Special attention is paid to the detection 
of the more important inorganic poisons. Professor Base and Dr. 
Kelly. 

Second Year. Organic and Physiological Chemistry. 1. Lectures 
and recitations. One hour per week throughout the session. 

This course includes the study of general organic chemistry -with 
special attention to the more important carbon compounds which 
are of particular importance to the student of medicine, with refer- 
ence to their relations to physiology, pathology and clinical medi- 
cine. Professor Coale. 

2. Laboratory Work. Six hours per week for one semester. 

This includes a study of the properties of the food stuffs, their 
decomposition and metabolic products, digestion, the blood, chem- 
istry of the secretions and excretions, and the various abnormal 
compounds resulting from perverted metabolism. The student will 
be expected to familiarize himself with the manipulation of the 
apparatus in .use in the study of the various secretions, excretions 
and fluids of the body. Associate Professor Whitney. 

Special Courses. Original Investigation. Graduates and ad- 
vanced students competent to undertake such work, who desire to 
pursue special chemical investigation, will be given the opportunity, 
under suitable regulations, with the advice and assistance of the 
Instructors of the Department. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY AND 
THERAPEUTICS. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Materia Medica 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

William Caspari, Jr., Ph.G., M.D.... Associate Professor of Materia Medica 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate in Therapeutics 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D Lecturer in Materia Medica 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Demonstrator in Pharmacology 

First Year. Two hours per week throughout the session are 
devoted to didactic lectures in materia medica proper, including the 
source, part used, habitat, active constituents, preparations and 
doses. This course includes instruction in pharmacy and the stu- 
dent is familiarized with the ordinary preparations of drugs. Asso- 
ciate Professor Caspari. 

54 



Second Year. Two hours per week throughout the session to 
didactic instruction in materia medica, pharmacology and thera- 
peutics. Professor Shipley. 

The class is divided into sections and each section has two hours 
a week throughout the session in laboratory pharmacology. 

The physiological action and toxicology of the more important 
remedial agents are observed on animals, and small sections of stu- 
dents work out these observations for themselves. Associate Pro- 
fessor Whitney and Dr. Wylie. 

Prescription writing and the physical properties of drugs together 
with recitations and assigned work, one hour per week throughout 
the course. Dr. Sinsky. 

Third Year. Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences. 
One hour a week to entire class throughout the session. 

This course is supplementary to the lectures on the Principles of 
Medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Dr. Messick. 

Physical Therapeutics. This course consists of weekly lectures and 
demonstrations on hydrotheraphy, thermotheraphy, massage, rest 
and exercise, the Weir Mitchell Treatment, radiotheraphy and elec- 
trotherapeutics. The basic physiologic principles and actions of the 
above mentioned agencies are given full consideration and study 
and the practical application is observed in the hospital and clinic 
and in visits to various institutions having well equipped depart- 
ments for treatment by physical means. A few lectures on sugges- 
tions are also given as the subject properly belongs to such a course. 
Professor Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Applied Therapeutics. During this year instruc- 
tion in the treatment of diseased conditions by remedial agents 
forms a large part of the teaching of medicine and the medical 
specialties. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

H. R. Spencer, M.D Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Howard J. Maldies, M.D Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Isaac M. Macks, M.D Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Harry W. Stoner, M.D Lecturer on Bacteriology 

Roscoe C. Metzel, M.D Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Leo Karlinsky, M.D Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Instruction in this department is given during the second and 
third years by lectures, laboratory work, quizzes, conferences and 

55 



the demonstrations of fresh and prepared specimens, and in the 
fourth year by a clinical pathological conference. 

Second Year. Bacteriology. Thirteen hours a week for eleven 
weeks. Lectures, 30 hours. Laboratory work, 113 hours, total 143 
hours. 

This subject is taught by lectures and practical laboratory work. 
The students are familiarized with the preparation of media, the 
cultivation, isolation and identification of bacteria and general labo- 
ratory technique as applied to clinical medicine. The important 
pathogenic microorganisms are studied culturally with such non- 
pathogenic form? as are necessary for comparison. At intervals 
mixed cultures are given out to the class and the students are re- 
quired to isolate and identify the bacteria in the mixture. 

Animal inoculations and autopsies are performed in connection 
with the bacteria studied. Students will also perform and study 
the serum reactions used for diagnosis, complement fixation tests 
and vaccine therapy. In this course is included the technique of 
the bacterial examination of water and milk. 

Pathology. This subject is taught in the second and third years 
with conferences in the fourth year. Lectures, 90 hours, laboratory 
work 212 hours, total 302 hours. 

The course is divided as follows: Second Year. General pathol- 
ogy, including the study of inflammations, degenerations, circulatory 
disturbances, infective granulomata and tumors. Eight hours a 
week for nineteen weeks, total 152 hours. 

This course extends from January to June. The greater part of 
the practical work is devoted to the study of the microscopic changes 
occurring in the above named conditions. Specimens for micro- 
scopic study are given to the students to be stained and mounted 
and this is supplemented by the study of gross material obtained 
from autopsies and from the museum. In this portion of the course 
an effort is made to train the students in the fundamental lesions 
and principles of pathology. Weekly throughout the course there 
is given a lecture accompanied by a demonstration with the projec- 
tion apparatus. In addition to the laboratory work, there are held 
regular quizzes for which purpose the class is divided into small 
sections. Students are required to be present at autopsies which 
are held frequently, the University and Maryland General Hospi- 
tals furnishing a large amount of material. 

Third Year. Special Pathology. Three hours a week during the 
entire year. In this course the special pathology of the organs and 

56 



systems is studied under the same system as detailed above. Fre- 
quent lectures with the use of the projection apparatus and quizzes 
also accompany this course. 

Students of the third year class are required to assist at autop- 
sies and are trained in the proper technique of the conduct and 
recording of same. 

Fourth Year. Clinical and pathological conferences. One hour 
a week throughout the year, total 30 hours. 

The specimens from autopsies are studied with reference to the 
clinical histories and the gross and microscopic anatomy. Special 
emphasis is laid upon the correlation of the anatomical findings-with 
the clinical symptoms and diagnosis. The demonstrations are illus- 
trated with sections of fixed material and cover slip preparations of 
exudates. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY AND SURGICAL SPECIALTIES. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Surgical Pathology 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D Professor of Practice of Surgery 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. D. Blake, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

St. Clair Spruill, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

John G. Jay, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

J. W. Holland, M.D Lecturer on Clinical Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Associate in Clinical Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate m Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate in Surgery 

A. G. Barrett, M.D Demonstrator of Surgery 

F. J. Kirby, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Fred Rankin, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

Harry L. Kolseth, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. D. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The course in surgery is progressive and aims to ground the stu- 
dent firmly in the principles of surgical science in order that later 
he may be prepared to build upon a firm foundation the superstruc- 
ture of surgical art. 

Second Year. During this year a practical course of bandaging 
is given upon the manikin; the student being required to apply 
personally the various forms of bandages to the different parts of 
the body. 

57 



Third Year. Surgical Pathology and Principles of Surgery. 
Lectures, recitations and clinics, three hours weekly at the I 'Di- 
versity Hospital. Professor Shipley. 

The class is divided in sections and receives instruction in history 
taking, gross surgical pathology and surgical diagnosis at the bed- 
side and in the dead house at the City Hospitals at Bay View. Pro- 
fessor Shipley and Dr. Lynn. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections and each 
section is given practical and individual work under the supervision 
of the instructors. 

This course begins with the study of the general principles of 
operative surgery; anaesthesia, asepsis, antisepsis, description of in- 
struments and sutures, etc. 

The various operations are first described and demonstrated by the 
instructor, and the student afterward practices them upon the subject. 

The entire subject of operative surgery is fully covered. Professors 
Martin, Spruill, Clinical Professor N. Winslow and Dr. R. P. Bay. 

Attendance upon surgical clinics and upon dispensary service is 
also expected when the student is not engaged in class work at the 
same hour. 

Fourth Year. Practice of Surgery. Illustrated by charts, draw- 
ings, pathological specimens, x-ray demonstrations, lantern slides 
and the balopticon, three hours a week. Professors Winslow and 
Warfield. 

Surgical Clinics. Operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, three 
hours a week to entire class. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin, Blake and Spruill. 

The class is divided into sections for ward instruction in surgery, 
for instruction in operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, and the 
post-operative treatment of surgical conditions, four days a week 
for two hours each day. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin, Blake and Spruill. 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of surgical 
ailments, two hours daily. 

The administration of anaesthetics is taught didactically and prac- 
tically and students are required to administer anaesthetics under 
the direction of an instructor. It is aimed to make the instruction 
during this year practical and to give the student first hand insight 
into the signs and treatment of surgical conditions. A large corps 
of able teachers and clinicians makes it possible to give unusually 
close attention to the practical clinical instruction of each student. 

58 



ETE AND EAR DISEASES. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D... .Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Wm. Tarun, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. E. Peteiiman, M.D , . . .Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

G. A. Fleming, M.D Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Edward A. Looper, M.D.,D.Oph Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology 



Eye 

Third Year. Instruction in anatomy, plrysiology and optics, 
illustrated by models, drawings, lantern slides, sections, etc., one 
hour each week for the first half of the second semester. During 
the last half of the second semester the class is divided into groups 
for demonstrations by sections, specimens, etc. of the anatomy and 
by models, drawings, etc. of the physiology of the eye, one hour 
each week for each section, Clinical Professor Tarun. 

At the end of this course an examination will be held. 

Fourth Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on diseased con- 
ditions of the eye; one hour each week for entire course, Professor 
Woods and Clinical Professor Tarun. 



Ear 

Lectures and recitations on anatomy, physiology and diseases of 
the ear, one hour each week during the first semester in addition 
to general clinic and section teaching mentioned below. Professor 
Crouch. 

Eye and Ear 

Clinical lectures and recitations in diseases of the Eye and Ear 
one hour each week during the first semester. Professor Woods. 

Clinical lectures and recitations in Diseases of the Eye and Ear one 
hour each week during the second semester. Professor Crouch 
and Clinical Professor Tarun. 

The class is divided into sections for instruction in diseases of 
the eye and ear daily throughout the course in the dispensaries of 
the University, Presbyterian Eye and Ear, and Maryland General 
Hospitals. 



59 



DERMATOLOGY 

T. Casper Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Demonstrator of Dermatology 

L. W. Ketron, M.D Demonstrator of Dermatology 

Clinical conference one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of the 
skin. Professor Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 
the diagnosis and treatment of the common skin diseases. Drs. 
Abercrombie and Robinson. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

Henry Chandlee, M.D Associate in Radiography 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Geo. E. Bennett, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

W. Saulsbury Niblett, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction will be given in the University 
Hospital Amphitheatre and Dispensary, Maryland General, at the 
Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children, at 
" Radnor Park," and Dispensary of same at 2000 North Charles 
Street. Twenty-eight weekly lectures will be given in the Univer- 
sity Amphitheater to the senior class as a whole and sections will 
be assigned to the out-patient and bed-side clinics. 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and instru- 
ments required in this surgical specialty, including x-ray technique; 
Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; deformities of the feet; 
non-tubercular diseases and deformities of bones and joints; the 
paralyses; the bursal, tendonous and muscular conditions producing 
orthopedic affections; rickets, scurvy, osteomalacia and chondro- 
dystrophies; wry-neck and the use and application of orthopedic 
apparatus. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Noge 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
R. H. Johnston, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Throat 
and Nose 

H. C. Davis, M.D Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat *nd Nos« 

George Murqatroyd, M.D., Demonstrator in Diseases of the Throat ana Nose 
E. G. Marr, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

60 



Fourth Year. Clinical lectures. One hour each week through 
out the session. Professors Merrick and John R. Winslow. 

Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the University Hospitah Clinical Professor Johnston and Dr. Davis. 

Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the Maryland General Hospital. Drs. Murgatroyd and Marr. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. B. Wolf, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Wm. M. Byerly, M.D Assistant in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

This course is entirely clinical and is taught chiefly in the dis- 
pensary. The student assumes the responsibility of certain cases 
under the supervision of instructors. 

The course includes the diagnosis, pathology and treatment of 
venereal diseases and syphilis together with a careful study of the 
less common genito-urinary diseases. The course includes instruc- 
tion in urinalysis, in endoscopic and cystoscopic examinations and 
the use of other instruments for the diagnosis and treatment of 
genito-urinary diseases. Many minor operations are performed in 
the out-patient department. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM. 

G. Milton Linthicum, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

John G. Jeffers, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This course is for instruction in diseases of the 
Colon, Sigmoid Flexure, Rectum, and Anus. 

One lecture a week throughout the year will be given in the Clini- 
cal Amphitheater of the University Hospital. The lectures will 
cover the essential features of the Anatomy, and Physiology of the 
large intestine; as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. 
The importance of diseased conditions and malpositions of the intes- 
tines, in relations to systemic disturbances, will be emphasized by 
demonstrations. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the amphitheater, 
wards and dispensaries of the University Hospital and the Maryland 

61 



General Hospital, where different phases of the various diseases will 
be taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the 
proctoscope and sigmoidoscope in examination of the rectum and 
sigmoid will be made familiar to each student. 

A course in Proctoscopy will be given at the City Hospitals at 
Bay View, where abundance of material is always obtainable. 

The methods of treatment, used in the office will be shown by 
treatment in the dispensary. Major and radical operative treatment 
will be given in the operating rooms in such manner that the student 
can be a part of it. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE AND MEDICAL SPECIALTIES. 



Ernest Zueblin, M.D Professor of Medic 

David Streett, A.M., M.D Professor of Practice of Medic 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Medic 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medic 

Harry Adler, B.A., M.D Professor of Clinical Medic 

J. M. Craighill, M.D Professor of Clinical Medic 

Jos. E.,Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medic 

Charles McElfresh, M.D Professor of Clinical Medic 

G. C. Lockard, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medic 

E. B. Freeman, S.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medic 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medic 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D Associate in Clinical Medic 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Clinical Medic 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate in Clinical Medic 

R. C. Metzel, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

J. F. O'Mara, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

G. M. Settle, M.D Demonstrator of Medic 

J. E. Brumback, M.D Assistant in Medic 



ne 
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Second Yeak. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in 
medical topography and the physical conditions in health, preparatory 
to the course in physical diagnosis in the third year. Two and one- 
half hours each week during the second semester. Professor Zueblin. 

Third Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on the principles 
of medicine, three hours a week throughout the session. Professor 
Wilson. 

Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences; one hour a 
week to entire class throughout the session. 

62 



This course is supplementary to the lectures on the principles of 
medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Dr. Messick. 

Clinical Medicine. Conference and recitations; one hour each 
week to entire class throughout the session. This course is supple- 
mentary to the lectures on the principles of medicine. Associate Pro- 
fessor Freeman. 

Clinical conference; one hour each week throughout the session 
to the entire class. Professor Mitchell. 

Physical Diagnosis. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction two hours each week for the entire 
session in the medical dispensaries of the University and Maryland 
General Hospitals. During the second semester, the students under 
the supervision of the instructors in medicine examine and treat 
patients in the medical dispensary. 

The class is divided into small groups and in the afternoons dur- 
ing one semester these groups are sent to the City Hospitals at Bay 
View and Maryland General Hospital for further instruction in his- 
tory taking and physical diagnosis, one hour each week. 

Fourth Year. Lectures, recitations and clinics, two hours a 
week to the entire class. Professors Street and Wilson. 

Clinical conference one hour a week at the Maryland General Hos- 
pital. Professor Street. 

Pathological-clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. 
Professors Zueblin and Hirsh. 

Clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. Professor 
Zueblin. 

The class is divided into sections for medical ward class instruc- 
tion three hours each week throughut the session. Professors Zue- 
blin, Street, Adler, Craighill, Gichner and McElfresh. 

Dispensary Instruction. The medical dispensary is daily from 12 
to 1 p.m., and the class is divided into small groups for practical 
instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of medical ailments. The 
dispensaries at the University and at the Maryland General Hospi- 
tals are available for this work. 

Clinical Clerk Service. Each man is required to study carefully a 
number of cases during the course for presentation at the medical 
ward classes and clinics. This includes a written history and phys- 
ical examination and examination of urine, blood, stomach contents 
and faeces. Professors Zueblin and Street. 

63 



DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

G. C. Lockard, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

J. E. Poulton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations, two hours each week. 
Professor O'Donovan and Associate Professor Lockard. 

Clinical conference, one hour each week at University Hospital. 
Professor Mitchell. 

The class is divided into groups and receives clinical instruction at 
the Maryland General Hospital and St. Vincent's Infant Asylum, 
three groups each week. Professor O'Donovan and assistants. 

Dispensary instruction daily at the University Hospital. Dr. 
Lockard. 

DISEASES OF THE STOMACH AND INTESTINES AND OF METABOLISM 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A. H. Carroll, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ulrich, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

This course consists of an out patient department or polyclinic in 
which the students of the graduating class are assigned weekly upon 
cases which they are directed to study and examine thoroughly and to 
report in person to the principal clinic once a week. 

All physical, chemical and microscopic work is done by the student 
himself and the report is read, with the presentation of the patient, 
which is followed by a conference with the director of the clinic. 
Many of these reports were of such merit that they were published 
in the Hospital Bulletin, and they are made to figure in forming the 
general average of the student. 

In addition to the ordinary diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract, 
this course embraces diseases of the soft tissues of the mouth and of 
the esophagus; gastroscopy; esophagoscopy and duodenal intubation. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor of Neurology 

G. M. Settle, M.D Demonstrator in Neurology 

Milton P. Hill, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week to 
entire class throughout the year. This course includes anatomy and 

64 



physiology of the nervous system. The method of neurological exam- 
ination and relationship of signs and symptoms to pathological con- 
ditions are taught. The material at the University, Maryland Gene- 
eral and City Hospitals is available 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week 
throughout the entire session. 

Clinical Conference, one hour each week to the entire class. This 
subject is taught at the University, Maryland General and City Hos- 
pitals at Bay View. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully 
examined; and complete written records are made by the students 
who demonstrate the case before the class. These cases are usually 
assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and each student 
in the class, must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections, two hours each week 
during entire year at the University and Maryland General Hospi- 
tals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the cases in the wards under the supervision of the instructors. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dis- 
pensary, four afternoons each week, in this way students are brought 
in contact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later man- 
ifestations. 

Electro Therapeutics. Instruction in the uses of the various types 
of electrical apparatus is given by lectures and demonstrations in 
the clinics, ward classes and out patient department. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HYGIENE. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D Professor of Medical Jurisprudence and Hygiene 

Second Year. One hour each week for entire session. 

Medical Jurisprudence. This course embraces consideration of med- 
ical evidence and testimony, confidential communications, malpractice, 
indications of death, pregnancy, delivery, infanticide and insanity. 

Hygiene. This course embraces consideration of impurities in air, 
purification of air, lighting, heating, purification of water, filtration, 
removal of waste, disposal of sewerage, disinfectants, practical dis- 
infection, food, preservation of food, beverages, exercise and clothing. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology 

H. U. Todd, M.D Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Demonstrator in Clinical Pathology 

65 



This is a practical laboratory course, with a portion of the time 
devoted to lectures. Eleven hours each week for one semester. 

The practical application of chemistry, physical chemistry, physi- 
ology and microscopy to the diagnosis and study of disease is taught. 
Each student is required to make examinations of stomach contents, 
faeces, blood, urine, sputum, and exudates and transudates. Especial 
effort is made to show the relation of laboratory findings to the his- 
tory and course of the disease as observed in clinical work. Haema- 
tology is taken up and haematological technique taught. Parasi- 
tology and its bearing on clinical medicine is considered. Serum 
changes in disease and immunity are also carefully outlined. 

TUBERCULOSIS OF THE LUNGS. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medicine 

John E. O'Neill, M.D Chief of Clinic 

A practical course is given in the Dispensary and at the Municipal 
Tuberculosis Hospital to small groups in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of pulmonary tuberculosis. The abundance of the material, 
both in incipient and advanced cases, makes this course of value in 
the practical recognition of the physical signs of the disease. 

MENTAL DISEASES. 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Clement Clark, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Percy Wade, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Frank W. Keating, M.D Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D Lecturer on Psychiatry 

Fourth Year. This course includes clinical lectures at the City 
Detention Hospital, Spring Grove Asylum, Springfield State Hos- 
pital, Mt. Hope Retreat and the Maryland Training School for the 
Feeble Minded. 

STATE MEDICINE. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D Professor of State Medicine 

Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations; one hour each week 
to the entire class throughout the session. 

The course in state medicine begins with a study of structure and 
function of the social organism, as revealed by the numerical analy- 
sis of population, births, deaths, sickness and migration. Elementary 
instruction and practice are given in vital statistics; in medical noti- 
fication, registration and certification; and in the laws and ordinances 

66 



concerning public health. The specific hygiene of the preventable 
diseases is next taken up, such choice being made as will familiarize 
the student with the epidemiology of the more important communi- 
cable diseases, and with the main instruments of prevention; notifi- 
cation, inspection, segregation, isolation, immunization and disinfec- 
tion. The course is planned from the viewpoint of official practice 
in public hygiene. 

TROPICAL MEDICINE. 

James A. Ntdegger, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Surgeon U.S.P.H. Service, Profes- 
sor of Tropical Medicine 

A course of lectures on tropical diseases to the Senior class was 
instituted in January, 1913, and continued during the remainder of 
the scholastic year. Eminent authorities on various subjects of this 
important branch of medicine delivered lectures during the course, 
and will continue to deliver lectures during the coming year; one 
hour each week to the Senior class. 

This addition to the curriculum has been made because of the in- 
creasing importance of Tropical Diseases; because of the large num- 
ber of students from southern states attending the school, and be- 
cause a large number of graduates of this school enter the U. S. 
Public Health Service and the Army and Navy Medical Corps, and 
many find employment as civil practitioners in tropical and sub- 
tropical countries. 

The course includes a thorough and comprehensive discussion of 
the history, etiology, pathology, morbid anatomy, differential diag- 
nosis, treatment and prophylaxis (with lantern slide illustrations) of 
the more important tropical diseases, such as amebic and bacillary 
dysentery, Asiatic cholera, plague, yellow fever, trypanosomiasis 
(sleeping sickness) filariasis, piroplasmosis, beri beri, dengue, pellagra, 
leprosy, hook-worm, bilharzia, rocky mountain or tick fever, sprue, 
spirochetosis, etc., and a study of the various parasites affecting 
both man and animals. 

Clinical lectures, presentation of cases, exhibition of specimens and 
practical methods of demonstrating the protozoa and parasites caus- 
ing tropical diseases will also be given. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

L. E. Neale, M. A., M.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

H. M. Freeman, M.D Chief of Out-patient Department 

67 



Third Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each week by 
Professors Neale and Rowland to entire class. 

Special obstetric and gynaecologic pathology, two hours each week 
by Professor Hirsh and H. J. Maldcis to class sections in the Path- 
ologic laboratory. 

Obstetric diagnosis (clinical) three hours each week at University 
of Maryland Hospital by Professor Neale and three hours each week at 
Maryland Lying-in Hospital by Professor Rowland to class sections. 

At the end of this year there will be a written examination cover- 
ing the subject as taught which will count one-half of the final grade 
in Obstetrics. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each week 
to the entire class. Professors Neale and Rowland. 

Operative obstetrics (manikin work) one hour each week by Pro- 
fessor Neale and assistants to class sections. 

Students are required to attend obstetric cases before, during and 
after confinement both in the University Hospital and the Maryland 
Lying-in Hospital as well as the out patient department associated 
with both hospitals and each student will be required to conduct and 
make accurate records of at least ten confinement cases seen under 
the personal supervision of one of the physicians connected with this 
department. 

Throughout this year recitations, operative work and clinical 
work will total the remaining half of the final grade. 

There are about 2000 obstetric cases annually available for teach- 
ing purposes and the student is afforded opportunities for instruction 
in this most important branch of medical science which are equalled 
by very few other schools in this country. 

There are ample accommodations in both hospitals for public and 
private patients. 

DEPARTMENT OF DISEASES OF WOMEN. 

Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D Professor of Diseases of Women 

W. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

H. W. Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

E. H. Hayward, M.D '. Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Demonstrator of Gynecology 

W. K. White, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

J. M. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

L. H. Douglas, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

68 



Third Year. Lectures, one hour each week throughout the 
course, thirty-two hours. Professor Ashby. 

The class is divided into sections for recitations and conferences 
one hour each week. Drs. Brent, Hayward, Willse, Mitchell, Streett, 
and Fenton. 

The class is divided into sections and receives instructions one hour 
weekly in diagnosis and gynaecological operations at the University 
Hospital. Professor Hundley. 

Sections in diagnosis and gynaecological operations two hours 
each week at the City Hospitals at Bay View. Dr. Brent. 

Sections in diagnosis and gynaecological operations one hour each 
week at the Maryland General Hospital. Professor Perry. 

Fourth Year. Operative Gynaecology two hours each week 
to the entire class. Professors Ashby, Perry and Hundley. 

Dispensary Instruction. The class is divided into small groups and 
receives instruction daily in the out patient departments of the Uni- 
versity and Maryland General Hospitals. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL 

FOR NURSES. 

Ethel P. Clark, R.N., M.U.H. '06. 

Superintendent of Training School. 

Mary E. Sullivan, R.N., M.U.H. '11. 

Assistant Superintendent. 

The University of Maryland Hospital Training School for Nurses 
offers a three years' course of training. 

Those wishing to obtain the course of instruction must apply per- 
sonally or by letter to the Superintendent of Nurses, who will fur- 
nish printed instructions respecting the personal information to be 
given by applicants. Letters of application should be accompanied 
by a statement from a clergyman testifying to good moral character 
and from a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired fac- 
ulties. Applicants must be between twenty-two and thirty-five 
years of age, of at least average height and physique, and must give 
satisfactory evidence of fitness in disposition and temperament for 
the work of nursing. 

If approved, applicants are received into the school for a period 
of six months on probation during which time demonstration classes 
are held and they are given instruction in the elementary part of the 
training. 

Classes are formed and pupils are received in the spring and autumn. 

High school graduates and women of higher education are given 



the preference. Their superior preparation makes them better 
fitted for the opportunities that are opening up in the profession of 
nursing. Graduates of this school are elegible for Red Cross and 
all Government work. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness of proba- 
tioners for the work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing 
them and she may at any time determine the connection of a pupil 
with the school in case of misconduct, inefficiency or neglect of duty. 

Except under special circumstances failure to pass the examina- 
tions at the end of the first year is considered a sufficient cause for 
the termination of a student's connection with the school. 

Students reside in the home and serve as assistants in the various 
departments of the Hospital for the full three years. They are ex- 
pected to perform any duty assigned to them by the Superintendent 
of Nurses. 

After the months of probation, students are required when on 
duty, to wear the dress prescribed by the Hospital which is blue and 
white striped gingham, with white apron and cap and linen collar and 
cuffs. Probationers are not allowed to wear this dress. 

Day Nurses are on duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m with one-half hour 
for dinner and three hours for rest and recreation. They are given 
an afternoon each week and part ol every Sunday. Each student is 
required to devote at least one hour daily to lecture, class work or 
study. A vacation of three weeks is allowed each year. 

In sickness all students are cared for gratuitously, but the time so 
lost must be made up. 

The course of training includes practical instruction in the nursing 
of medical; surgical, orthepedic, gynaecological patients, obstetrics, 
the nursing of children and the operating room work. 

A course of lectures is given by the physicians and surgeons of the 
University and class instruction with demonstrations by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses and her assistants. Examinations are held at 
stated periods 

When the full term of three years is ended, the nurses thus trained 
will be at liberty to choose their own fields of labor, whether in hos- 
pitals, in private families, or in the various branches of social work 
which offer such tremendous opportunities for the woman of abilty. 
A diploma is given upon completion of course of training. 

In addition to board, lodging and a reasonable amount of laundry 
work, each student receives an allowance of $5.00 per month to de- 
fray the expenses of uniforms, text-books, etc. incidental to her 

training. 

70 



GBADUATE3. 1911 

Letitia Elvira Lord West Virginia 

Marie Elizabeth Sander Maryland 

Lula Rebecca Stepp Ncrth Carolina 

Bertie Mae Sigmon North Carotin a 

Grace Belle Stoneham Virginia 

Olive Belle Burns Maryland 

Bertie Rebecca Hd giies Maryland 

Sadie Ethylind Davis Maryland 

Virginia Rebecca Clendenin Maryland 

Pearl Ivory Grant Maryland 

Julia Cecelj v. Foley . Maryland 

Meno Pearl Weaver North Carolina 

Malde E8TELLE Miller Maryland 

Marie Katharine Balsle y North Carolina 

Jessie Sier Funk Maryland 

Alice Keturah Coulbourne Maryland 

Lucy Courtney Hill Maryland 

Grace Ozella Hull Virginia 

Ann Griffith Dukes Maryland 

Bessie May Roussey Maryland 

Carrie Edith Murray Virginia 

Frances Arlington Shelton Virginia 

Abigail Gertrude Ryan New York 

Elsie Spring McCann Maryland 

Marjorie Boteler Sprecher Maryland 

Margaret Jane Ervin Maryland 

Edythe Lavenia Ebvin Virginia 

Katharyn Regina Zepp Maryland 

Dorothy May Weber Georgia 

Carrie Heath Hudnall *. Virginia 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the Board of 
Trustees of this Fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 

Samuel C. Chew, M.D., LL.D. D. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Harry Adler, M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar. D. 

Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. Charles Markell, LL.B. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating, 
filling itself its vacancies. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied in the dis- 
cretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. Contributions, 
donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. They 
may be made to the general or University Fund to the Medical 
Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended 
for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical 
fund or to some special object, as building, research, library, pathology, 
hospital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, 

71 



prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly 
regarded. Attention is invited to the "Charles Frick Research 
Fund," already established in memory of that distinguished investi- 
gator. Checks should be made payable to Charles Markell, Treas- 
urer, 1137 Calvert Building, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund* 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State 
of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 






72 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 

The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 

The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an 
orator will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old 
classmates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates 
who have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President— James H. Jarrett. M.D. 

First Vice-President — Joseph T. Sm'ith, M.D. 

Second Vice-President — Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Third Vice-President — J. Charles Macgill, M.D. 

Recording Secretary, A. H. Carroll, M.D. 

Assistant Recording Secretary, Howard W. Jones, M.D. 

Corresponding Secretary, J. T. Smith, M.D. 

Treasurer, John Houff, M.D. 

Executive Committee — G. Lane Taneyhill, M.D., Chairman, C. R. Win- 
terson, M.D., B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D., S. K. Merrick, M.D., John I. 
Pennington, M.D. 

Application for membership should be accompanied with Initiation Fee of 
$1.00 and mailed to the Corresponding Secretary or Treasurer. 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President— L. W. Farinholt, D.D.S. 
Vicp-President — W. N. Owens, Phar. G. 
Treasurer — Eugene W. Hodson. 
Secretary — John Henry Skeen. 
Corresponding Secretary — Edward P. Crummer. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
J. E. Evans, President. 

This Association since its establishment, eighteen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

The Association now occupies comfortable rooms in one of the buildings of 
the University. 

73 



Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout 
the College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character 
and morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session to wel- 
come new students to the University, and will also be glad to render assistance in 
the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding houses, etc., and to extend any 
other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges of the Association, and to address the officer named 
below, who will be glad to furnish any information desired regarding the Asso- 
ciation and its work, and to render any assistance in his power, and upon ar- 
riving in the city are requested to make themselves known as soon as possible. 

J. E. Evans, President. 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 






74 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 

FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A ;: Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor o* Moral Science. 

John Brockaway Rippere, M.A. (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Vice-President, Professor of 

Latin. 
John B. \Vhite, M.A. ( Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A. (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor of 

Mathematics. 
Charles G. Eidson, B.S.E.E., M.A. (Graduate of the University of Tennessee), Associate Member 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 
Adolf Schumacher, Ph.D. (Graduate of Gottlngen and University of Pennsylvania), Professor of 

French and German. 
Sidney Gunn, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Harvard University), Professor of English. 
Edmond Earl Lincoln, B.A. (Graduate of Ohio Wesleyan University and of Oxford, England), 

Professor of History and Political Economy. 
Chauncet St. C. McNeill. U.S.A. (Lieutenant of the United States Army), Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 
Reginald H. Ridgely, B.S., M.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Biology. 
Thomas L. Gladden, Superintendent of the Preparatory School and Instructor In English and 

Latin. 
R08COE E. Grove, B.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Assistant In Preparatory School. 
Sarah Berry, Registrar and Secretary for the President. 



DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

The regular Winter Session begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the following 
May. 
The requirements for admission are the same as In all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

R. Dorset Coale, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 
J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 
Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 
J. William Smith, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

Elmer E. Cruzen, D.D.S., Professor of Crown and Bridge Work and Ceramics. 
B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 
Eldridge Baskin, M.D., D.D.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Dentis ry and Orthodontia. 
J. S. Geiser, D.D.S., Associate Professor of Dental Prosthesis and Operative and Prosthetic Tech- 
nics. 
J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 
Clydb V. Matthewb, D.D.S., Instructor of Histology and Dental Anatomy. 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 
Robert L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 
E. Frank Kelly, Ph.G., Director of Chemical Laboratory. 
Francis J. Valentine, A.M., D.D.S., Director of Dental Infirmary. 

For information and annual catalogue address T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean, Balti- 
more, Md. 

75 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



LAW DEPARTMENT. 

FORTY-FIFTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Dean. 
Alfred Baoby, Jr., Esq., Testamentary Law. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., Practice Court, Legal Ethics and Banking Law. 
Hon. Carroll T. Bond, Bills and Notes and Pleading. 
J. Wallace Bryan, Esq., Common Carriers. 
Howard Bryant, Esq., Practice in State Courts. 
W. Calvin Chestnut. Esq., Insurance. 
Ward B. Coe, Esq., Title and Conveyancing. 
James U. Dennis, Esq., Personal Property, Including Bailments. 
Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., Contracts and Agency. 
Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations. 
Eli Frank, Esq., Torts. 
Hon. James P. Gorter, Evidence. 
Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Domestic Relations. 
Charles McH. Howard, Esq., Equity Jurisprudence. 
Arthur L. Jackson, Esq., Conflict of Laws. 
Stuart S. Janney, Esq., Commercial Law. 
Sylvan H. Lauchheimer, Esq.. Bankruptcy. 
Hon. Alfred S. Niles, Constitutional Law. 

Eugene O'Dunne, Esq., Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence. 
William Lee Rawls, Esq., Contracts and Agency. 
Albert C. Richie, Esq., Elementary Law. 

Hon. John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Patents, Trade- 
Marks and Copyrights. 
G. Ridgley Sappington, Esq., Practice Court. 
Hon. Henry Stockbridge, International Law. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., Real Property. 
Clarence A. Tucker, Esq., Equity Procedure. 
Joseph N. Ullman, Esq., Sales and Personal Property. 
Samuel Want, Esq., Director of Library. 

For catalogue containing full information, address, EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary and 
Treasurer of Law Faculty, 301 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 1841-1904. 

THE SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL SESSION. 

FACULTY. 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M. R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

H. A. Brown Dunning, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles C. Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Vegetable Histology. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

Louts J. Burger. Ph.G., LL.B., Lecturer on Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 

George Stahl, Phar.D., Demonstrator In Dispensing. 

76 




■~ fmm I fcL-4 




'T'^y, 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

OF 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL 
OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS 



BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




SESSION 1915-1916 



BALTIMORE 

WILLIAMS & WILKINS COMPANY 

1915 




UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 




MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL 



The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 



and 



The College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 



1915 



CALENDAR. 



1915. 

June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University, Mercy and 
Maryland General Hospitals. 

October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

October 11. — Re-examination of Deficient Students and Examina- 
tion for Advanced Standing. 

November 24. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

November 29. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a.m. * 

December 23. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 






CHRISTMAS RECESS. 

1916. 

January 3. — Lectures resumed. 9 a.m. 

June 1. — Commencement, Annual Meeting of Alumni Associations. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor, or Master of Arts or Sciences. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland was established in Baltimore in 1807; The College 
of Physicians and Surgeons was established in Baltimore in 1872. 
The consolidated school offers a high grade course in medicine 
extending over a period of four years, and leading to the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The School of Dentistry was founded in 1882, and is 
designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral part of the 
School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The School of Pharmacy was established in 1841 as the 
Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated with the School of 
Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers two years, and leads 
to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 

3 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OP THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D. . LL.D. Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. 
Thomas A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D. Philemon H. Tuck, LL.D. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Timothy A. Heatwole, M.D. , D.D.S. 

Hon. John C. Rose Hon. Robert Moss, 

D. M. R. Culbreth, Ph.G.. M.D. David Streett, A.M., M.D. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D. , Ph.D., LL.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 
Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D. Hon. Alfred S. Niles, 

Daniel Base, Ph.D. Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq. 

Ridgelt B. Warfield, M.D. William L. Rawls, Esq. 

John W. Chambers, M.D. Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D. 

A. C. Harrison, M.D. Wm. S. Gardner, M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. George W. Dobbin, M.D. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. PHILLIPS LEE GOLDSBOROUGH 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 
THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D.. D.C.L 
President of St, John's College. 

PROFESSOR J. B. RIPPERE, A.M.. and 

PHILEMON H. TUCK, A.M., LL.D. 

For St. John's College. 

PROFESSORS RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. and 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M.D. 

For School of Medicine. 

PROFESSORS HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., and 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D. 

For School of Law. 

PROFESSOR T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 

For School of Dentistry. 

PROFESSOR CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 
For School of Pharmaey. 

4 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FOUNDED J807. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

FOUNDED 1872. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 
L. E. NEALE, M.D., LL.D. 
CHARLES W. MITCHELL, A.M., M.D. 
THOMAS A. ASHBY, M.D., LL.D. 
J. HOLMES SMITH, M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 
ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D. 
DAVID STREETT, A.M., M.D. 
SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 
RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 
GORDON WILSON, M.D 
WILLIAM SIMON, Ph.D., M.D., Sc.D. 
JOHN W. CHAMBERS, M.D., Sc.D. 
WILLIAM F. LOCKWOOD, M D. 
GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A.B., M.D. 
WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M.D., Sc.D. 
HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 
ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON, M.D. 
CARY B. GAMBLE, Jr., A.M., M.D. 
WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 
STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D 
JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 
6 






BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

L. E. Nbale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical 

Medicine. 
Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Diseases of Women. 
J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Clinical Medicine. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Surgical Pathology. 
David Streett, A.M., M.D., Professor of Practice of Medicine. 
Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Practice of Surgery. 
Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Principles of Medicine. 
William Simon, PhD., M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Chemistry. 
John W. Chambers, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Nathaniel G. Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Medical 

Jurisprudence and Director of Pasteur Institute. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
Ernest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Experimental and Clinical Medicine. 
Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 
Harry Adler, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. C. Pole, M.D., Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 
J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 
Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

and Clinical Medicine. 

6 



G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 
W. B. Perry. M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman B. Mardbn, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Professor of Hygiene. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. M. CraigdiLjL, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine afld Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElFresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Jas. A. Nydegger, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Surg. U. S. P. H. Service, Professor of 
Tropical Medicine. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.B., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene and 
Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pathology and Experi- 
mental Medicine. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of 
Medical Clinic. 

Samuel J. Fort, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, Ph.G., M.D., Clinical Professor of Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 
and Roentgenology. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery and Surgical 
Pathology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Neurology and Psychi- 
atry. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Clinical 
Surgery. 

E. L. Whitney, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry, Phar- 
macology and Clinical Pathology. 

E. B. Freeman, B.Sc, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 



J. Clbmbnt Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery and Associate in 
Anatomy. 

VVm. I. Messick, M.D., Associate Professor of Therapeutics and Clinical 
Medicine. 

Holliday H. Hayden, M.D., Associate Professor of Applied Anatomy. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 
and Dermatology. 

Hubert C. Knapp*M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Abraham Samuels, Ph.C, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

William W. Requardt, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Caleb W. G. Rohrer, A.M., M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Glenn M. Litsinger, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

George W. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and 
Nose. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

A. Ferdinand Ries, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry and Clinical Pathology. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

J. R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Wm. Greenfeld, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

C. C. Conse'r, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. E. Peterman, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D. Associate in Clinical Pathology and Pathologist to 
University Hospital. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology and Assistant Gastro- 
Enterologist to the University Hospital. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate in Proctology. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Associate in Chemistry. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Associate in Clinical Surgery. 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine and Pedi- 
atrics. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate in Clinical Surgery. 

J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate in Anatomy and Histology. 

Sydney M. Cone. A.B., M.D., Associate in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D:, Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D., Associate in Genito-Unnary Diseases. 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Henry Chandlee, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

8 



H. L. Sinsky, M.D., Associate in Materia Medica. 

H. W. Stoner, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate in Neurology and Clinical Medicine. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Sttjbbs, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Associate in Physiological Chemistry, Pharmacology 

and Clinical Pathology. 
L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 
T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 
Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
Wm. T. Watson, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Geo. A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 
H. K. Fleckensteix, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmolog} 7 and Otology. 
C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate in Medicine. 
Maurice Lazenby, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
T. F. E. Bess, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
W. Milton Lewis, M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 
Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
Harvey B. Stone ; A.B., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 
T. K. Nichols, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Associate in Bacteriology. 
G. F. Sargent, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Psychiatry. 
R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate in Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Emil Novak, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 
Frank W. Keating, M.D., Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics. 
W. P. E. Wyse, M.D., Lecturer on Psychiatry. 
W. G. Queen, M.D., Lecturer on Osteology. 

G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
H. C. Davis, M.D., Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 
G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 
I. F. O'Mara, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 
R. G. Willse, M.D., Demonstrator of Gynecology. 
George Murgatroyd, M.D., Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and 

Nose. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., Demonstrator of Surgery. 
Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Demonstrator of Dermatology. 
J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
F. J. Kirby, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
W. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 
Fred Rankin, A.M., M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 
Milton P. Hill, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 
H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

9 



S. H. Streett, B.S., M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Christian Deetjen, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Instructor in Gastro-Enterology. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

H. J. Walton, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

George E. Bennett, M.D., Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Ernest G. Marr, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 

Howard D. Lewis, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

S. A. Bain, M.D., Assistant in Dermatology. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

Ernest G. Marr. M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. E. Brumback, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

H. L. Kolseth, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

J. D. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Assistant in Anatomy. 

G. H. Woltereck, M.D., Assistant in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

John H.' Vorhes, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery and Roentgenology. 
D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D., Assistant in Neurology and Psychiatry. 
Isadore Hirschman, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
C. W. Rauschinbach, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
John S. Fenby, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 



10 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Surgeons. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., L.L.D. Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. J. D. Blake, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 
Charles VV. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. 

John C. Hemmeter, Ph.D., M.D. Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. 

David Streett, A.M.,. M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Attending Gynecologists. 

Thomas A. Ashby, M.D., L.L.D. W. B. Perrt, M.D. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D. 

Attending Obstetricians. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., L.L.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. J. Frank Crouch, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
Samuel K. Merrick, A.B., M.D. John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Proctologist. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Attending Orthopedist. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 

Gideon Timberlake. M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Roentgenologists . 
Henry Chandlbe, M.D. H. J. Walton, M.D. 

11 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
William J. Coleman, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 



Resident Surgeons. 

Elmer Newcomer, M.D. L. A. Buie, A.B., M.D. 

W. Houston Toulson, M.S., M.D. R. B. Hill, A.M., M.D. 



R. L. Johnson, M.D. 



Vincent J. Demarco, M.D. 



Harry Stein, M.D. 
M. J. Egan, M.D. 



Resident Physicians. 



B. L. Wilson, M.D. 
E. H. Tonolla, M.D. 



A. S. Coleman, M.D. 



Resident Gynecologists. 

Wm. H. Jenkins. M.D. 



P. L. Rush, M.D. 



Resident Obstetricians. 

J. C. Brogden, M.D. 

Charles E. Sima/M.D. 



John F. Lutz, A.B.. M.D. 



Resident Pathologists. 

G. H. Dorset, M.D. 



CLINICAL ASSISTANTS FOR 1915-1916. 



Richard T. Arnest Virginia 

Robert Bailin New York 

Thomas L. Bray North Carolina 

Thomas E. Brown Pennsylvania 

Michael E. Cavello New York 

J. J. Chandler, A.B South Carolina 

C. S. Crook Maryland 

S. T. Day New Jersey 

Thomas Domixguez Porto Rico 

Bernard J. Ferry Pennsylvania 

Frederick T. Foard North Carolina 

Peter N. Gatsopoulos Greece 

George H. Gwynn Florida 

H. W. Gwynn 



Albert L. Hawn North Carolina 

Juan A. Lay Porto Rico 

Clark S. Long Pennsylvania 

F. J. Mejias Porto Rico 

Joseph Moses New York 

A. B. Nevling Pennsylvania 

Lyman R. Porter Maryland 

M. G. de Quevado Porto Rico 

Chas. A. Reifschneider Maryland 

George W. Rice Maryland 

Herbert W. Rogers Virginia 

A. M. Santos Cuba 

Norwood N. Voss Maryland 

Florida 



The total number of patients treated in the Hospital during the year 
1913-14 was 7638. 



12 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

SURGICAL DIVISION. 
Surgeons. 

John W. Chambers, M.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Charles F. Blake, M.D. William W. Requardt, M.D. 

Harvey B. Stone, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. Thos. R. Chambers, M.D. 

Alfred Ulman, M.D. A. G. Rytina, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 
George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Orthopedist. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

MEDICAL DIVISION. 
Physicians. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Associate Physicians 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D. Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. William T. Watson, M.D. 

Louis J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 

Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

13 



Associate Gastro-Enterologist. 
T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D. 

Pediatrists. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetrician. 
George W. Dobbin, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Emil Novak, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

gynecological division. 

Gynecologist. 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists. 
Abraham Samuels, M.D. George Strauss, M.D. 

pathological division. 

Pathologist. 
William Royal Stokes, M.D. 

Associate Pathologist. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 

clinical pathological division. 

Clinical Pathologist. 

Charles E. Simon, M.D. 

14 



PASTEUR DEPARTMENT. 

Director. 
Nathaniel G. Keirle, M.D. 

Assistant Director. 
Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 



X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographer. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Assistant Radiog- apher. 
John Howard Vorhes, M.D. 



HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. 



Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., 

Chairman. 
John W. Chambers, M.D. 
Charles F. Blake, M.D. 



William F. Lockwood, M.D. 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Secretary. 
Gary B. Gamble, M.D. 



R. H. Walker, M.D. 
J. B. Lohan, M.D. 
Frank M. Moose, M.D 
H. L. Rogers, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons. 

R. W. McKenzie, M.D. 

E. F. Gott, M.D. 

F. X. Kearney, M.D. 
Alvin McClung, M.D. 



A. E. Callaghan, M.D. 
H. H. Johnson, M.D. 



W. H. Bash, M.D. 



Resident Physicians. 
E. E. Mayer, M.D. 

T. H. Morrison, M.D. 

L. K. Fargo, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 

H. M. Stewart, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

Accident Service. 

15 



Fred. P. Weltner, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Rev. Robert L. Wright, Superintendent. 

Visiting Staff. 
Surgeons. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. 

Associates. 

Nathan Winslow, A.B., M.D. H. C. Blake, M.D. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D. A. G. Barrett, M.D. 

Physicians. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D. A. C. Pole, M.D. 

David Streett, A.M., M.D. Charles O'Donovan,. A.M., M.D. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Chas. W. McElfresh, M.D. E. B. Freeman, M.D. 

Associates. 

Thos. W. Keown, A.B., M.D J. E. Brumback, M.D, 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D. Wm. T. Riley, M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

Neurologists. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. Clement Clark. M.D. J. Percy Wade, M.D 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 
S. K. Merrick, M.D. John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. 

Obstetricians. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 

W. B. Perry, M.D. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. 

16 



E. H. Hayvvard, M.D 



Associate?. 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D 

Ophthalmologists. 



S. H. Strbett. S.B., M D. 



Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 



H. E. Peterman, M.D. 



Associates. 
R. D. West, M.D. 



J. Frank Crouch, M.D. 



Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 



Proctologist. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Associate. 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 



W. B. Wolf, M.D 



Radiologist 
John Evans, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Strobel. A.B., M.D. 



Urologists. 



Gideon Timberlake, M.D. 



Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologist. 
H. R. Spencer, M.D. 

Chief of House Staff. 
John Evans, M.D. 



J. E. Dull, M.D. 
Richard Binion, M.D. 
Kenneth McCullough, M.D. 
C. H. Moses, M.D. 



Resident Staff. 



17 



W. B. Blanchard, M.D. 
F. E. Shipley, M.D. 
W. A. Bridges, M.D. 
S. D. Shannon, M.D. 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgton-in-Chief. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., First Assistant and Dispensary Surgeon. 

W. B. Hunter, M.D., Second Assistant Surgeon and Superintendent. 

Miss Caroline H. Barney, R.N., Head Nurse. 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atejnson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Richard H. Johnston, M.D. 

Attending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake, M.D 

Attending Oculist and Aunst. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Radiologist. 
Henry Chandlee, M.D. 

Assistant Radiologist 

Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

18 



Attending Dentist. 
G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

L. McLane Tiffany, A.B., M.D. W. S. Halsted. A.B., LL.D., B.Sc, M.D. 
Randolph Wjnslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D, 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. Charles W. Mitchell. A.M., M.D. 

William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 
John N. Mackenzie, A.B., M.D. 



STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITALS AT BAYVIEW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

Milton C. Winternitz, A.B., M.D., Pathologist. 

Consulting Staff. 

Ophthalmologist. 

James J. Mills, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

Otologist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 
19 



Gynecologists. 
Edward H. Richardson, M.D. Hugh Brent, M.D. 

Urologists. 
Gideon Timberlake, M.D. John T. Geraqhtt, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. A. Strobel, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 



ST. ELIZABETH HOME. 

Attending Physician. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Surgeon. 
Alexis McGlannan, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
A. C. Gillis M.D. 



STAFF OF NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL. 

Attending Physicians. 

Chas. F. Bevan, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., 

Resident Physician . 
E. F. Gruetzner, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

John W. Chambers, M.D., Wm. S. Baer, M.D. 

Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D., Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Oculist and Aurist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Superintendent. 

Miss Elizabeth M. Stone. 

20 



ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. P. F. Martin, M.D. 

Eugene H. Hayward, M.D. J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

Elmer G. Hill, M.D. Leonard M. C. Parker, M.D. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank Martin, B.Sc , M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

R. B. Warfield, M.D. 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Pathologists. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
John A. Maxwell. 



MATERNITE HOSPITAL. 

Visiting Obstetricians. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Thos. K. Galvin, M.D. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

Prof. L. E. Neale, 
Prof. J. M. H. Rowland, Obstetricians. 

Associates. 
J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. H. S. Gorsucr, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 

Theodore B. Warner, Jr , M.D. 

21 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Chief of Out-Patient Department. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., G. M. Settle, A.B., 

M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Medicine. 
S. R. Clarke, M.D., R. C. Metzel, M.D., H. U. Todd, M.D., W. G. Clopton, 

M.D., Eugene Kerr, M.D., M. S. Schimmel, M.D., Wm. I. Buppert, 

M.D., Assistants. 

R. P. Bay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Chief of Clinic. 

Fred. Rankin, A.M., M.D., Thos. L. Phillips, M.D., Edgar S. Perkins, 
M.D., Edward S. Johnson, M.D., W. F. Sowers, M.D., John Schweins- 
berg, M.D., Charles R. Edwards, M.D., Assista?its. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor oj Clinical Pediatrics. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., C. W. Rauschenbach, M.D., Assistants. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., W. K. White, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willse, 
M.D., L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases 
of Women. M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D., Assistant. ' 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 
E. A. Looper, M.D., Assistant. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D., Chiefs of 

Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Stomach. 
J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Assistant. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 
Note. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., W. Harry Daniels, 
M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

George M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Assistants. 

G. Milton Linthicum M.D., Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 
J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Clinic. 

Mr. A. D. Johnson, Secretary to the Dean and Superintendent of College Build- 
ings 

22 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Surgery. 
E. H. Hutchins, M.D. Thos. R. Chambers, M.D, 

O. L. Lloyd, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

E. B. Wright, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Anton G. Rytina, M.D. W. D. Olmstead, M.D. 

Wm. J. Todd, M.D. D. H. Goldman, M.D. 

Harry Goldberg, M.D. A. E. Goldstein, M.D. 

A. L. Tumbleson, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. John H. Vorhes, M.D. 

Medicine. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D. W. T. Watson, M.D. 

L.J. Rosenthal, M.D. Robt. B. Mayo, M.D. 

W. F. Zinn, M.D. B. S. Hanna, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. 

Diseases of Stomach. 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. T. Fred'k, Leitz, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases. 

A. C. Gillis, M.D. D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D. 
Otto H. Duker, M.D. W. D. Boyd, M.D. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 

B. E. Tapman, M.D. B. Kader, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 
A. Samuels, M.D. G. A. Strauss, M.D. 

Emil Novak, M.D. C. F. J. Coughlin, M.D. 

Diseases oj Throat and Nose. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. G. W. Mitchell, M.D. 

W. C. Stifler, M.D. John Wade, M.D. 

Diseases oj Eye and Ear. 
Harry Friedeny/ald, M.D. Jos. I. Kemler, M.D. 

Diseases of the Rectum. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. . L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Diseases of the Skin. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 

23 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Robert L. Blake, M.D., Dispensary Chief. 

Medicine. 
John S. Fischer, A.B., M.D., T. W. Keown, M.D. J. R. Brumback, M.D. 

Surgery. 

A. G. Barrett, M.D., Chief. 

John B. Culverhouse, M.D., Austin H. Wood, M.D., James E. Talbott, 
M.D., Assistants. 

Nose, Throat and Chest. 
Geo. W. Murgatroyd. M.D. Ernest G. Marr, M.D 

Diseases of Children. 

Prof. Charles O'Donovam 
John S. Fenby, M.D. Gustav A. Fritz, M.D. 

Dermatology. 
Edgar R. Strobel, M.D. Samuel A. Bain, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

Eugene H. Hayward, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

Sidney H. Streett, M.D. Jas. M. Fenton, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Sydney M. Cone, M.D. 

Diseases of Eye and Ear. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. R. D. West, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. 

Proctology. 
G. Milton Linthicum. M.D. Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 

24 



MATRICULATES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, 1914-1915. 



POST GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Name. State. 

Edgar Paul Adams Maryland 

William Henry Ayler Maryland 

Bernard McCurley Bradford, M.D North Carolina 

William J. Carson, M.D Pennsylvania 

John Wilborn Coltrane North Carolina 

Nicholas M. Crofts, M.D Massachusetts 

Martin A. Flaherty, M.D Pennsylvania 

H. Clifford Grant, M.D North Carolina 

Francis Joseph Harrington '. Massachusetts 

Isidore Isaac Hirshmor, M.D Maryland 

Earl Grayson Johnson Virginia 

John H. Judkins, M.D Vermont 

Jamil Tannus Laham Palestine 

Robert J. Maresca New Jersey 

A. Lawrence Miner, M.D Vermont 

William Henry Moyniham Massachusetts 

John W. Parker, M.D South Carolina 

B. S. Parks, M.D West Virginia 

David Mantre Seymoub, M.D North Carolina 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Anderson, Franklin B Maryland 

Armstrong, Ralph H Pennsylvania 

Arnold, J. Bruce, Jr Michigan 

Bennett, J. A Virginia 

Binion, Richard, Ph.G Georgia 

Blackmer, J. W North Carolina 

Braverman, Abraham Maryland 

Bridgers, Harvey C North Carolina 

Bridges, William Arthur, B.S North Carolina 

Buie, Louis A., A.B South Carolina 

Burleson, William Brown North Carolina 

Calladine, Thomas Matthew, Jr New York 

Clinkscales, Ralph Reuben South Carolina 

Cohen, Ralph Washington, D. C. 

Cohn, Charles A., D.D.S Pennsylvania 

Demarco, Vincent Mississippi 

Diener, Louis Virginia 

Dorsey, George Hamilton Maryland 

Dowling, Joseph Leo Rhode Island 

Durkin, Patrick A Rhode Island 

Egan, Michael Joseph, Jr Georgia 

Ellner, David New York 

English, Samuel M Pennsylvania 

Etzler, Dorsey Paul Maryland 

Flickinger, William H Pennsylvania 

Fritz, Gubtavb A Maryland 

25 



Name. state. 

Gaonon, Arthur J Rhode Island 

Gilbert, Harry Jesse jj ew j^gy 

Goldman, Harry Maryland 

Gonzalez, Carlos Porto Rico 

Gordy, Lyle Leland Maryland 

Greenberg, S. H California 

Grossman Louis W Pennsylvania 

Hay, Edward F.. M.E : % . . ..Pennsylvania 

Hendrix, Neyins Byford, A.B., A.M South Carolina 

Higgins, Gerald Leo N ew Jer sey 

Hill, Robert B., B.S., A.M North Carolina 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland 

Jenkins, Ralph Hathaway Maryland 

Jenkins, William H Virginia 

Jenrette, Wendell Vivien North Carolina 

Johnson, R. W South Carolina 

Johnson, Willie R South Carolina 

Jones, Milton E Maryland 

Justice, J. I Ohio 

Kelly, Richard Bernard Connecticut 

Kerkow, Roy Robinson Washington 

Krantz, Herman Warner Connecticut 

Lackey, Franklin Harris : North Carolina 

Lane, Edgar Winslow, B.S North Carolina 

Lanich, Lloyd J Pennsylvania 

Lewis Addison LeRoy Soxith Carolina 

Linhardt, Oscar V Maryland 

Lipnick, J. Alexander Maryland 

Lowhy, John, A.B North Carolina 

McCullough, Kenneth Maryland 

McReynolds, Alva E Illinois 

Massanet, Carlos L New York 

Merkel, Henry A Maryland 

Meyers, Lloyd R Pennsylvania 

Miller, William Cleveland Pennsylvania 

Moffett, Daniel Bruce, A.B Alabama 

Morrow, Thomas Lacy North Carolina 

Moses, Charles Howard Pennsylvania 

Myers, Charles W Pennsylvania 

Myers, M. Weaver Maryland 

Naumann. Albert A Massachusetts 

Patrick, George R North Carolina 

Portuondo, Alberto L Cuba 

Prickett, Clarence J., B.S West Virginia 

de Quevedo. Alberto Garcia Porto Rico 

Raskin, Moses Georgia 

Ray, Hickman North Carolina 

Rice, George W Maryland 

Riordan, Arthur Hatton Massachusetts 

Robinson, John Daniel, A.B North Carolina 

Ross, George Perry Maryland 

Ruark, William T North Carolina 

Rush, Playford L Maryland 

Sanders, Lucius Carl South Carolina 

Scher, Isidor New York 

Schnuck, Harry Maryland 

Schreiber, Louis Walter Maryland 

Shafer, Ralph A Maryland 

Shannon, Samuel Dennison Maryland 

Sharkey, Myles Bernard New York 

26 



Name. Stat*. 

Shipley, Frank E., A.B Maryland 

Sima, Charles E....' Maryland 

Sloan, William Henry, B.S .' North Carolina 

Snyder, Samuel Pennsylvania 

Stern, Max E New York 

Street, Russell B Connecticut 

Stringer, John Thomas Virginia 

Studebaker, David C Pennsylvania 

Tonolla, E. Howard Maryland 

Umpierre, Ramon C Porto Rico 

Updike, Ernest H West Virginia 

Wait, Joseph Judson Virginia 

Warner, Theodore B Maryland 

Williams, William F., Jr Maryland 

Wilson, Bascom L North Carolina 

Woodland, John C, Phar.D Maryland 

Zeller, Eugene J. K Maryland 

Ziegler, Mark Victor, A.B Maryland 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Arnest, Richard T Virginia 

Baldwin, Anton, Jr Maryland 

Bailin, Robert New York 

Bennett, Percival R North Carolina 

Benson, Edward H Maryland 

Bickle y, W. E. , A.B South Carolina 

Bishop, Everett L Georgia 

Bolen, Henry L . .Massachusetts 

Bowden, George A Maryland 

Bray, Thomas Latham North Carolina 

Brooke, Charles Robert .Maryland 

Brown, Thomas E Pennsylvania 

Brumbaugh, Benjamin B., Phar.D , Maryland 

Bu-rton, Charles Hammon Maryland 

Carter, Paul Conway, B.S .Natth Carolina 

Carrasquillo, Honorio F Porto Rico 

Cavello, Michael E New York 

Chandler, James Jennings, A.B South Carolina 

Childs, Charles Chapin New York 

Cole, Lewis Furbeck New York 

Condon, Vernon H .Maryland 

Crook, Charles S Maryland 

Cudd, James Eric, A.B South Carolina 

Day, Samuel Thomas New Jersey 

Dillon, William Joseph Massachusetts 

Dominguez, Tomas Pot to Rico 

Eby, John Cyril, Phar.D Maryland 

Evans, John Ebenezer, A.B .South Carolina 

Eyestone, Fred L ....• Ohio 

Feinglos, Israel Maryland 

Ferneyhough, Willie Todd 1. .. .Virginia 

Ferry, Bernard Joseph .Pennsylvania 

Finkelstein, Max ; New York 

Floyd, F. F .North Carolina 

Foard, Fred T North Carolina 

Foley, Joseph .... .Massachusetts 

Folk, Robert Hamilton, A.B .........:.. South Carolina 

Gannon, Clarence Lee ".v. V.. .N-ew-York 

Gatsopoulos, Peter Nicholas , ...".. Massachusetts 

27 



Name. State. 

Gillett, Harold E New York 

Ginsburg, Jacob B : Maryland 

Glatzau, Lewis W ' Pennsylvania 

Growt, Bowen H Louisiana 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Jr Florida 

Gwynn, Humphrey W Florida 

Hammer, Howell Inslisp, Ph.G Maryland 

Hanigan, S. Roscoe Pennsylvania 

Hawn, Albert Gaither North Carolina 

Hennessy, Jay Tyrrell New York 

Hughes, Samuel S North Carolina 

Hutton, Daniel C Maryland 

Jacobson, Bernard Samuel Maryland 

Kean, Thomas Stephen, Jr Maryland 

Knapp, Lee H A . New Hampshire 

Kritzer, Henry Rowland North Carolina 

Lababes, Gregory, A.B Philippine Islands 

Laplanche, Ernest R Maryland 

Lay, Juan Alfonso Cuba 

Lazenby, Allen D Maryland 

Light, Ellsworth E Massachusetts 

Long, Glare Samuel Pennsylvania 

Lopez, Enpenio N. Bocanegre, Phar.D Porto Rico 

Lovely, Bernard Henry New Hampshire 

Lowsley, Augustus S California 

McKenna, William Henry Rhode Island 

Machin, Frank H Maryland 

Marino, Frank Christian Maryland 

Mason, Frank Ebaugh Maiyland 

Maxwell, John A., A.B Connecticut 

Mayo, Woodward B Utah 

Mejias, Francisco J Porto Rico 

Mellor, Royal B Maryland 

Miller, John E Vermont 

Mitchell, Henry Stanley Maryland 

Moses, Joseph, B. A. , A.M New York 

Naikelis, Stanley, B.S Connecticut 

Nevling, A. Boynton Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Frank P New York 

Nicklas, John M Maryland 

Noell, Robert Holman North Carolina 

O'Brien, J. Gerald Maryland 

Oduber, Jacob Dutch West Indies 

Oddo, Vincent New York 

O'Malley, William F New York 

O'Neill, Joseph T Massachusetts 

Pasuth, Bartholomew Charles Connecticut 

Payawal, Juan L., A.B Philippine Islands 

Penabaz, Fernando, B.S Cuba 

Pinkerton, Frank Coulson Virginia 

Pole, Charles A Maryland 

Porter, Lyman R Maryland 

Pbuitt, Samuel O., A.B South Carolina 

De Quevedo-Rios, Manuel Garcia Porto Rico 

Reier, Adam William Maryland 

Reifschneider, Charles Adam Maryland 

Rigby, Cecil, B.S South Carolina 

Roberts, Joseph John Connecticut 

Rogers, Herbert W Virginia 

Rogers, Samuel J South Carolina 

28 



Name. Stat: 

Rolenson, Julio R Porto Rico 

Rothrock, Walter Roswell Pennsylvania 

Ruzicka, F. Frederick, A.B Maryland 

Santos-Buch, Angel If., Lit.B Cuba 

Scimeca, Salvatore New York 

Shaffer, Stewart Seibert Pennsylvania 

Short, Noah H West Virginia 

Stein, Harrt Milton New Jersey 

Strandberg, Herbert Lawrence New Jersey 

Thomas, Edward Philip Maryland 

Thompson, Edwin Brice Ohio 

Van Poole, Carl M North Carolina 

Voss, Norwood Warner, A.B Maryland 

Wellman, Harrison M Pennsylvania 

Wentz, Maurice Cornelius, B.S Maryland 

Whittle, William Oscar Virginia 

Yaffe, Benjamin Meyer Maryland 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Algre-Carbo, Pablo Cuba 

Apacible , Pedro Philippine Islands 

Armstrong, Fred Francis Connecticut 

Audet, Charles Henry Massachusetts 

Bampfield, Fred J Canada 

Barishaw, Samuei New Jersey 

Bennet, DaCosta F., A.B Maine 

Bonner, Octavius B North Carolina 

Bowes, William J. F., A.B Maryland 

Bronushas, Ipolitas B Maryland 

Burrows, Ernest A Massachusetts 

Campo, Anthony R New York 

Carlin, Edward J New Jersey 

Carroll, H. Roland Maryland 

Cohn, Alexander Maryland 

Cooper, Frank H Washington 

Coulon, Frank N New Hampshire 

Covey, William C West Virginia 

Crawford-Frost, John Ings Maryland 

Darby, William Arthur Maryland 

Daves, John Thomas Virginia 

Davidson, William Brown Massachusetts 

Donahue, Cornelius L New York 

Doole y, George E New York 

Doyle, Joseph F New Hampshire 

Duffy, Vincent Paul West Virginia 

Eisenberg, Albert Maryland 

Ephraim, Myer Maryland 

Fay, Daniel Edgar Maryland 

Fazenbaker, Anderson J Maryland 

Fernandez-Garcia, Luis Jorge Porto Rico 

Frost, Nugent G Massachusetts 

Giesen, John Jacob, A.B Virginia 

Hedrick, Erland H West Virginia 

Hodges, H. Stuart North Carolina 

Holmes, James Maryland 

Houde, Arthur J Massachusetts 

Huff, Wheeler O Maryland 

Isaacs, Raphael Harris Maryland 

Jarman, A. Russell North Carolina 

20 



Name. State. 

Kaufman, Edgar W Pennsylvania 

Kirk, William V West Virginia 

Knowleb, J. R Maryland 

Koprivich, Milan Ivanovitch S Servia 

Leiva, Carlos E. Rivas Cuba 

MacGregor, Allan W Connecticut 

Martin, John Willis Maryland 

Martinez, Jose Porto Rico 

Mblroy, Raymond Shields Pennsylvania 

Merrick, Frank X Pennsylvania 

Michael, M. Harlan Maryland 

Miller, Daniel Maryland 

Miller, Wilfred Porter, M.E New York 

Moran, Arthur Bernard Connecticut 

Mulcahy, Francis J Massachusetts 

Nagourney, Leon New York 

Nolan, Francis F Virginia 

Norris, J. Edward Maryland 

Ogden, Frank Nevin Maryland 

Peeler, Casper Smith, B.S Florida 

Penabaz y Fernandez, Jose, A.B Cuba 

Porro, Adalberto C Florida 

Porterfield, Ma rvin H West Virginia 

Pobey, Chester R Pennsylvania 

Power, Maurice J Massachusetts 

Reddig, Clarence M., Ph.D Pennsylvania 

Reitzel, Elbert Coy North Carolina 

Reynolds, Paul Emerson Maryland 

Rever, William B Maryland 

Rigau, Gabriel Porto Rico 

Rodriguez, Antonio, Jr Porto Rico 

Salan, Joseph Indiana 

Shaver, William T North Carolina 

Shayt, Louis Maryland 

Silverstein, Max New Jersey 

Skilling, John Galen Maryland 

Smith, Leroy Henry Maine 

Sorin, Israel C New Jersey 

Stein, Albert Massachusetts 

Thaureaux, Elado Cuba 

Tarkington, Grayson E Arkansas 

Thomas, Kelly Clifton North Carolina 

Thoner, John George West Virginia 

de Veer, Gerard, Jr Dutch West Indies 

Vaughan, Geobge W , Maryland 

Welch, Robert S. G Maryland 

Wheeler, Howard Lawrence Maryland 

White, George Lawrence Maryland 

Whistler, Edward L., A.B Pennsylvania 

Wolff, Carl O., A.B North Carolina 

Wolford, Roy A West Virginia 

Woltz, Charles Roderick Virginia 

Worrell, Churchill Freeman Virginia 

Yost, Ernest Lee West Virginia 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Allen, Eustace A. , A.B Alabama 

Anderson, Lang W South Carolina 

Andrew, Clarence Gridmore, A.B . -South Africa 

3a 



Name. Stat*. 

Block, David S Maryland 

Bro.is, Samuel Isadore Maryland 

Chesbro, Charles C New York 

D alton, William B North Carolina 

DeFeo, Charles C Connecticut 

Dillon, William M New York 

Easter, Clay Miller Rust Virginia 

Flippin, Eugene Littlejohn North Carolina 

Gavronsky, Samuel New Jersey 

Gillson, William George New Jersey 

Griffith, Wesley Powell, A.B Pennsylvania 

Hart, Crawford Avery, A.B North Carolina 

.Hill, Dennis L West Virginia 

Hutchison, Charles L., D.D.S North Carolina 

Kellom, John Wise Virginia 

Macke, Clarence Edgar Maryland 

Morisey, Raymond Faison North Carolina 

McLeod, Walter Guy North Carolina 

Morgan, Zachariah Raphael Maryland 

Ridgely, Irwin Oliver, A.B Maryland 

Ripoll y Mayoral, Joaquin Cuba 

Rohles, Charles Walter Florida 

Russell, Frank J Maryland 

Seal, Gratta Earl West Virginia 

Sindler, Joseph Maryland 

Speake, Thomas Carlyle, A.B Maryland 

Sweet, Alfred Norton Connecticut 

White, S. Howard South Carolina 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1914-1915. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 160 

School of Medicine 372 

Department of Law 397 

Dental Department 120 

Department of Pharmacy 94 

Training School for Nurses 85 

Total 1228 



31 



GRADUATES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, JUNE 1, 1915. 



Richard Binion Georgia 

Jocelyn William Blackmer North Carolina 

Harvey Clifton Bridgers North Carolina 

William Arthur Bridges North Carolina 

Louis A. Buie South Carolina 

William Brown Burleson Noith Carolina 

Thomas Mathew Calladine New York 

Ralph Cohen. District of Columbia 

Charles A. Cohn Pennsylvania 

Vincent J. Demarco Mississippi 

Louis Diener Virginia 

George Hamilton Dorsey Maryland 

Joseph Leo Do wling Rhode Island 

Patrick Aloysius Durkin Rhode Island 

Michael Joseph Egan, Jr Georgia 

Dorsey Paul Etzler Maryland 

Gust ave Adolph Fritz Maryland 

Harry Jesse Gilbert New Jersey 

Carlos Gonzalez y Gonzalez Porto Rico 

Lyle Leland Gordy Maryland 

Samuel Harry Greenberg California 

Louis Ward Grossman Pennsylvania 

Gerald Leo Higgins New Jersey 

Robert Burns Hill North Carolina 

William Herndon Jenkins Virginia 

Milton Easley Jones Maryland 

Robert William Johnson South Carolina 

William Robert Johnson South Carolina 

James Isaac Justice West Virginia 

Bernard Richard Kelley Connecticut 

Roy Robinson Keekow Washington 

Herman Warner Krantz Connecticut 

Franklin Harris Lackey North Carolina 

Edgar Winslow Lane North Carolina 

Lloyd Jackson Lanich Pennsylvania 

Addison LeRoy Lewis South Carolina 

Oscar Vernon Linhardt Manjland 



John Albert Berchard Lowry North Carolina 

Kenneth McCullough Maryland 

Alva Edgar Mc Reynolds Illinois 

Lloyd Rogers Meyers Pennsylvania 

William Cleveland Miller Pennsylvania 

Daniel Brcce Moffet Alabama 

Thomas Lacy Morrow North Carolina 

Charles Howard Moses Pennsylvania 

Charles Wesley Myers Pennsylvania 

Milfert Weaver Myers Maryland 

Albert Augustus Natjmann Massachusetts 

Alberto Portuondo y del Pino Cuba 

Alberto Garcia de Quevedo y Munoz 

Porto Rico 

Moses Raskin Georgia 

Hickman Ray North Carolina 

Arthur Hatton Riordan Massachusetts 

John Daniel Robinson North Carolina 

George Perry Ross Maryland 

William Thomas Ruark North Carolina 

Playford Lorenza Rush Maryland 

Lucius Carl Sanders South Carolina 

Harry Schnuck Maryland 

Louis Walter Schreiber Maryland 

Samuel Dennison Shannon Maryland 

Myles Bernard Sharkey New York 

Frank Earl Shipley Maryland 

Charles Edward Sima Maryland 

John Thomas Stringer Virginia 

David Clemington Studebaker Pennsylvania 

E. Howard Tonolla Maryland 

Joseph Judson Waff Virginia 

Theodore B. Warner Maryland 

Bascom L. Wilson North Carolina 

John C. Woodland Maryland 

Eugene Joshua Karl Zeller Maryland 

Mark Victor Ziegler Maryland 



PRIZEMEN. 

University Prize— Gold Medal Michael Joseph Egan, Jr. 

Certificates of Honor. 

Bernard Richard Kelley, Bascom L. Wilson, 

Vincent J. Demarco, George Perry Ross, 

E. Howard Tonolla, Louis Ward Grossman, 

Dorsey Paul Etzler. 



32 



MATRICULATES, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS, 1914-1915. 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 



Anderson, J. K Utah 

Arrache, Joseph S Porto Rico 

Rash, VV. H West Virginia 

Berrios, M. B Porto Rico 

Berrios, V. C Porto Rico 

Breslin, Robert H Rhode Island 

Callaghan, A. E West Virginia 

Cobian, Joseph Porto Rico 

Cooper, Prince West Viiginia 

Corson, Linne H New Jersey 

Conarton, J. L Pennsylvania 

Cramer, L. L Pennsylvania 

DeMartini, S. A Washington 

Fargo, Leon K Maryland 

Fernos, Antonio Porto Rico 

Fitzpatrick, E. E Rhode Island 

Galvin, T. K Maryland 

Gardner, Howard E Massachusetts 

Gonzales. Luis F Porto Rico 

Gott, E. Fred West Virginia 

Hearn, Wm. O West Virginia 

Hoffman, Ira C Pennsylvania 

Holmes, CM Maiyland 

Jackson A.J Massachusetts 

Jarrei.l, D. B West V irginia 

Johnson, H. H Massachusetts 

Kearney, F. X Maiyland 

Lamb, Thos. A Virginia 

Law, H. D Maryland 

Levy, Milford Florida 

Ijnger. Basil West Virginia 



Lohan, J. B West Vuginia 

Lyon, Curtis L West Virginia 

McCallion, W. H New Jersey 

McKenzie, W. R Pennsylvania 

McClung, Alvin West Virginia 

Mahoney, V. L Pennsylvania 

Miller, Lawrence Maryland 

Morrison, T. H Pennsylvania 

Xougeras, ,1. J Porto Rico 

Peck, Robert S West Viiginia 

Perry, Herbert G. North Carolina 

Pesquera, Gilberto Porto Rim 

Purcell, En riqtje Porto Rico 

Raemore, Millard Pennsylvania 

Renz, Oscar W Pennsylvania 

Rieger, E. M New York 

Rogeps, H. 1 Virginia 

Schaun, Paul E Maryland 

Spalding, W. C Texas 

Spangler, C. C Pennsylvania 

Sprowls, Garrett E Pennsylvania 

Stale y, Elmer B Pennsylvania 

Steell, Paul B Pennsylvania 

Stewart, Harrison M Massachusetts 

Tadeusiak, B. II New Jersey 

Thorup, John M Utah 

Tickle, T. G West Virginia 

Trachtenberc , Israei New York 

Weltner, Fred P West Virginia 

Woodall, R . E West Virginia 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 



Aikman, David A Pennsylvania 

Baggot, Bartus T Maryland 

Beck, F. A Pennsylvania 

Biddle, B. II Ohio 

Byrne, I. P. A New York 

Cannon, James M West Viiginia 

Chaput, Lucien R Massachusetts 

Compton, Fillmore West Virginia 

Dunne, Edward P Connecticut 

Eyestone, Fred L Ohio 

Feldman, Maurice Maryland 

Flynn, William H Connecticut 

Foley, M.J Maryland 

Fox well, Raymond K Maryland 

Gonzales, Felipe Porto Rico 

Greutzner, Edward T Pennsylvania 

Hege. J. R North Carolina 

Howard, Lewis H Maryland 

Krr.K, Pavi. M.N Wrxt Virginia 



Kean, Thos. S Maryland 

Lypton, Charles H North Carolina 

Lynch, W. J Connecticut 

Mathai, J. H Illinois 

Madden, W. L New Jersey 

Martin, Frank S Maryland 

Morales, R. (Ramerez) Porto Rico 

McCamey, Kenneth E Pennsylvania 

McLean, George Maryland 

O'Brien, Thomas J Connecticut 

O'Neill, G New York 

Peterson, Arthur F Massachusetts 

Post, Guy R West Virginia 

Savannah, J. G New Jersey 

Shetter, Andrew G Pennsylvania 

Shirkey, Wilbur F West Virginia 

Sternberg, A Jerusalem 

Syrop, Edward New Jersey 

Wolfe, Humphrey D Maryland 



33 



SECOND YEAR CLASS. 



Bloom, George H Maryland 

Bloom, Lawrence H Maryland 

Bohl, Luis J New Jersey 

Champin, Edward H New Jersey 

Champlin, Roy D New York 

Clark, Frederick H Georgia 

Cunningham, Thomas P Rhode Island 

Elder, Franklin C Maryland 

Hertzog. Francis C Pennsylvania 

Isquierdo, Eladio Porto Rico 

Kectherside, Hillary D Arizona 

Krause, Louis A. M Maryland 

LaRue, Raymond Ohio 

Lasher, Lemuel A Pennsylvania 



Lynch, Raymond A West Virginia 

M addison, W. E Utah 

Montgomery, Mathison J Pennsylvania 

Movers, Emmet Dewitt West Virginia 

x-icClintock, George L Maryland 

Perry, Clarence E Virginia 

Rigby, Samuel B Utah 

St. Lawrence, A. J Connecticut 

Smith, Leo L Oklahoma 

Stansbury, Fred West Virginia 

Tierney, Edward F Rhode Island 

"Viewig, Max W West Virginia 

Weber, John Joseph Maryland 

Wheaton, Harry YV New York 



FIRST YEAR CLASS. 



Briscoe, Everard Maryland 

Clark, Harold C New York 

Cleary, James F Connecticut 

Crouch, Norman S Maryland 

Dellz, Ramon Porto Rico 

Fortney, Millard H We&t Virginia 

McGladigan, G. J Pennsylvania 



Murphy, D. W Massachusetts 

Pilson, Robert A Maryland 

Smith, Edward W North Carolina 

Trippett, L. H West Virginia 

Thompson, L. F New Jersey 

Ve»CH, O. L Montana 



34 



GRADUATES, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS 
AND SURGEONS, 1915. 



Anderson, John R Utah 

Arrache, Joseph S Porto Rico 

Bash, W. H West Virginia 

Berrios, M. B Porto Rico 

Berrios, O V Porto Rico 

Breslin, Robert H Rhode Island 

Callaghan, A. E West Virginia 

Cobian, Joseph Porto Rico 

Cooper, Prince West Virginia 

Conarton, J. L '. Pennsylvania 

Corson, Linne H blew Jersey 

Cramer, L. L Pennsylvania 

DeMartini, S. A Washington 

Fargo, Leon K " Maryland 

Fernos. Antonio Porto Rico 

Fitzpatrick, E. E Rhode Island 

Galvin, Thos. K Maryland 

Gardner, Howard E Massachusetts 

Gonzales, Louis F Porto Rico 

Gott, E. Fred West Virginia 

Hearn, Wm. O West Virginia 

Hoffman, Ira C Pennsylvania 

Holmes, C. M Maryland 

Jackson, A. J Massachusetts 

Jarrell. D. B West Virginia 

Johnson, H. H Massachusetts 

Kearney, F. X Maryland 

Lamb, Thos. A Virginia 



Levy, Milford Florida 

Lyon, Curtis L West Virginia 

Lohan, J. B West Virginia 

McCallion, W. H New Jersey 

McKenzie, W. Raymond Pennsylvania 

McClung, Alvin West Virginia 

M ahoney, V. L Pennsylvania 

Morrison, T. H Maryland 

Nogeuras, J. J Porto Rico 

Peck, Robert S West Virginia 

Perry, Herbert G North Carolina 

Pesquera, Gilberto Porto Rico 

Purcell, C. E Porto Rico 

Raemore, Millard Pennsylvania 

Renz, Oscar W Pennsylvania 

Rieger, E. M New York 

Rogers, Harry Lee Virginia 

Spalding, \Y. C Texas 

Spangler, Charles C Pennsylvania 

Sprowls, Garrett E Pennsylvania 

Stale y, Elmer B Pennsylvania 

Stewart, Harrison M Massachusetts 

Tadeusiak, B. H New Jersey 

Thorup, John M Utah 

Weltner, Fred P West Virginia 

Trachtenberg, Israft Neiv York 

Wood all, R . E West Virginia 



PRIZEMEN. 

Millard L. Raemore Pennsylvania 

Leon K. Fargo Maryland 

T. H. Morrison Maryland 

S. A. DeMartini Washington 



WORTHY OF HONORABLE MENTION 



E. E. Fitzpatrick 
H. H. Johnson 
Alvw McClung 
g. e. spro-wl8 



\V. Raymond McKenzie 
Costas E. Purcell 
J. R. Anderson 
H. B. Tadeusiak 



R. H. Breslin 



35 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 



The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of the 
oldest institutions of medical education in America, having been 
chartered in 1807, under the title of the College of Medicine of Mary- 
land. 

Five years later, in 1812, by authority of the General Assembly 
of Maryland, the College of Medicine of Maryland was empowered 
to annex to itself three other colleges or faculties, viz: The Faculty 
of Divinity, the Faculty of Law, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four faculties or colleges thus united were "constituted an 
University by the name and under the title of the University of 
Maryland." 

The Medical School of the University is thus its oldest department 
and ranks fifth, in point of age, among the medical colleges of the 
United States. 

Throughout the century of its existence it has always taken 
rank as one of the leading medical colleges of the South, and among 
the most widely known and most highly honored of the schools 
of medicine of the country. 

Beginning with the modest number of five, composing the first 
graduating class in 1810, the list of graduates in medicine of the 
University of Maryland, now numbers six thousand and eighty-five 
names, drawn from all parts of the United States and from abroad, 
among which are to be found some of the most noted names con- 
nected with the history of medicine in our country. 

While from the foundation of the University of Maryland, the 
policy of the Faculty of Physic has been one of wise conservatism, 
it has, at the same time, never been behindhand in the march of 
educational progress, and while retaining for so long a time as they 
were of real value, those features of older educational methods which 
were wisest and best, they have often been first, and always among 
the first, in the adoption of all measures tending to improvement in 
methods of medical teaching, and to true elevation of the standard 
of mod;oal education. 

In illustration of this the following facts may be mentioned: 

It established one of tne first Medical Libraries and the first Med- 
ical College Library in the country (1813). 

36 



It was among the very first to provide for adequate clinical instruc- 
tion by the erection of its own hospital, available at all times for the 
use of students (1823). 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland was the 
first medical school in America to make dissecting a compulsory 
part of the curriculum (1833). 

It was the first to give instruction in Dentistry (1837). 

It was among the first to meet the modern demand for instruction 
in specialties (1866). 

It was the first medical school in America to establish separate 
and independent chairs of Diseases of Women and Children (Jan- 
uary, 1867) and of Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

It was among the first to teach Hygiene and Medical Jurisprudence 
(1883). 

It is the aim of the present Faculty of Physic of the University 
of Maryland to carry out this policy established by its predecessors. 

With this end in view, the Faculty has, in the last few years, 
expended, and is now expending, large amounts in the establishment 
and equipment of its Lying-in Hospital, its Laboratories of Chemistry, 
Histology, Pathology and Bacteriology, in the erection of the Uni- 
versity Hospital, which was completed in 1897, and in the erection of 
a new Laboratory Building, recently completed. 

By arrangement between the two institutions, The Baltimore 
Medical College, established thirty-two years ago and having over 
two thousand graduates, has been merged with the School of Med- 
icine of the University of Maryland. 

By this arrangement the members of the Faculty of this well 
known institution become teachers in the School of Medicine of the 
University of Maryland, which takes over the equipment of the 
Baltimore Medical College and succeeds to all the clinical privi- 
leges which it formerly enjoyed in a number of general and special 
hospitals, thereby greatly increasing and improving the facilities for 
instruction in all departments. 

All graduates of the Baltimore Medical College are now eligible 
for membership in the General Alumni Association of the University 
of Maryland. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore was organ- 
ized and incorporated under the General Laws of the State of Mary- 

37 



land in 1872. In 1878, by an Act of the Legislature, this school 
was consolidated with the Washington University School of Medi- 
cine which had been established in 1827, and the combined schools 
were designated as the College of Physicians and Surgeons of 
Baltimore. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was at first located at 
115 West Lombard Street, near Hanover, in the building which was 
later known as the Maternite and which was used until the fire 
of 1904 for the Obstetrical Department of the College. In 1878, 
following the merger with the Washington University, the College 
was moved to the building previously occupied by that school at 
the corner of Calvert and Saratoga Streets. In 1899 the old building 
was removed and the present college building was erected. The 
location is in the center of the city, within one block of the Post 
Office and at the same distance from the Court House. It is readily 
accessible to all of the main car lines of the city. 

The College Building is well lighted and conveniently arranged 
for coordinating the work of the students as well as the work of the 
several departments. 

The Dispensary, which occupies the greater part of the ground 
floor, is entered from the street level on Calvert Street. Additional 
space for Dispensary teaching is provided on the main floor. Upon 
this floor are also located the Faculty Room, the Library, the Ad- 
ministration offices, the Pathological Museum, the Physiological 
Laboratory, the Pasteur Laboratory, and a classroom which seats 
seventy-five students. 

The third floor has two amphitheaters, one of which is equipped 
with the most recent projection apparatus. The Clinical Labora- 
tory, the Chemical Laboratory, the Histological and Pathological 
Laboratory and private laboratories are also located on this floor. 
The fourth floor is devoted to Clinical Work and includes a modern 
operating amphitheater which seats 300 students and which is 
surrounded by a suite of accessible rooms for sterilization, anesthetiz- 
ing, dressing and operations of a minor character. On this floor 
are also located the Bacteriological Laboratory and a special Patho- 
logical Laboratory. The Anatomical Laboratory on the fourth 
floor is well lighted and well ventilated. 



38 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

UNITED IN 1915, AND HEREAFTER THE TWO SCHOOLS 
WILL BE CONDUCTED AS ONE. 

The students of the first and second years will be taught by a 
single group of teachers. 

In order to utilize as completely as possible the large number of 
patients in the hospitals controlled by the Faculty, the third and 
fourth year classes will each be divided into two groups. One group 
of the third year class and one group of the fourth year class will 
be taught at the hospitals associated with the University of Maryland 
and the other group from each class will be taught at the hospitals 
associated with the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Students 
of the third and fourth years will have the privilege of Choosing the 
group to which they will be attached. Students of both groups will 
have the same final examinations and will receive identical diplomas. 

The Faculty is therefore in position .to offer to students of medi- 
cine and graduates a course of combined didactic, clinical and labo- 
ratory instruction which will compare favorably with that offered 
by any medical school in the United States. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 

39 



the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in ac- 
commodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new and 
modem hospital of fully double the capacity of the former building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 
etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatom}^. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as a marine hospital for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institution 
give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga streets, then owned by the Wash- 

40 



ington University, in 1875. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly 
growing demands upon it. However, il was not until 1888 that the 
Sisters of Mercy with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the corner stone of the 
present Hospital. This building was completed and occupied late 
in 1889. Since thru the growing demands for more space has com- 
pelled the erection of additions until now there are accommodations 
for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore < it y Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 700,000 
inhabitants and is under the exclusive medical control of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. It adjoins the College building and 
all surgical patients from the public wards are operated upon in the 
College operating rooms. This close proximity of the Hospital 
and College greatly facilitates the clinical teaching as there is no 
time lost in passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric 
Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and its branches. 

During the calendar year of 1914 there were treated in the wards 
of the Hospital 5,064 patients. That the emergency service is very 
large is shown by the fact that during this time 3,385 ambulant 
cases were treated in the accident department. In other out-patient 
departments there were treated 8,947 patients, making a total of 
17,396 ill or injured people who applied for treatment during one year. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The clinical service of this hospital is controlled exclusively by 
the University of Maryland. It is situated on Linden avenue, north 
of Madison street, is five stories in height, has a capacity of one 
hundred and sixty (160) beds, and is so arranged that patients may 
be brought from the wards directly before the class in the amphi- 
theater. This hospital contains patients suffering from almost every 
form of indigenous disease, and nearly every variety of injury. 
Special operating and dressing rooms are provided with sterilizers 
and all necessary surgical instruments, apparatus and appliances, 

41 



including Roentgen ray for locating foreign bodies, examining bones, 
etc. Dressings and operations occupy a large portion of each day. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

Three resident physicians are annually appointed to this hospital 
from among the graduates of the University. 

For purposes of instruction in this branch, the members of the 
Junior Class are taken in sections into the wards of the hospital 
where, under the supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and his 
Assistants, the}' are practically trained in the various methods of 
physical examination of obstetric patients. 

Sections of the Senior Class are assigned in rotation to attend 
labor cases in the hospital and arrangements have been made by 
which members of these sections shall reside in an annex to the hos- 
pital, whence they may be summoned without delay at any hour. 

By such arrangement the Senior students are afforded oppor- 
tunities of thoroughly utilizing the large clinical material offered by 
this important department. 

The out-door clinic now includes an obstetric dispensary opened 
daily for the ante and post-part um care of this class of patients, as 
well as the pre-natal care of their offspring. 

Students of the Senior class are required to attend this dispensary 
clinic as well as labor cases at the homes of the patients under the 
supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics and his Assistants. 

Each student will be required to conduct and keep accurate record 
of at least ten confinement cases under such supervision. 

THE MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material which is under the control 
of the University of Maryland. There is an out-door clinic con- 
nected with this hospital, which is well organized and is under the 
supervision of the Obstetrical Department of this school. 

42 



Synopsis of the Reports of the Resident Physicians for the year ending May 1, 

1915. 

Number of Confinements in Hospitals 756 

Number of Confinements in Out-Door Department 1531 

Total 2287 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class, 50. 

THE MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM. 

'MATERNITE.) 

The Maryland Lying-in Asylum, in which the obstetrical clinics 
are held, was established by the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
in 1874. It is the pioneer institution of its kind in the State of 
Maryland, and one of the first in this country. 

The Lying-in Asylum is open during the entire year, and furnishes 
every student in the graduating class of the school valuable training 
in the practice of midwifery. 

THE CITY HOSPITALS. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely in- 
creased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of City 
Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals to be 
used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily visits 
and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the City Hospi- 
tals, and the dead-house furnishes a great abundance and variety 
of pathological material, which is used for demonstration. 

The City Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds, 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds, 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which was founded in 1877, largely through the 
efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the 
Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the largest 
special hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1914 there were admitted to the Dispensary and 
Hospital, 11,688 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

43 



THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
every modern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as well 
as a most beautiful park-like environment and farm, and is closely 
affiliated with the University of Maryland. 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland by 
the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school to pre- 
sent to its students liberal opportunities for the study of diseases 
of infants and children. 

MOUNT HOPE RETREAT FOR THE INSANE. 

This hospital contains an average of 1,000 patients, is attended 
by Prof. Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., of this faculty, and presents 
rare opportunities for the study of nervous and mental diseases. 

SOUTH BALTIMORE EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT CHARITY 

HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is situated in south Baltimore and has a large out- 
patient department devoted to Diseases of the Eye, Ear, Nose and 
Throat. 

Dr. H. E. Peterman is visiting surgeon, and small groups of stu- 
dents are sent there for instruction in the above named diseases. 

ROSEWOOD STATE TRAINING SCHOOL 

This hospital situated in the suburbs of Baltimore is owned and 
controlled by the State of Maryland. It contains 700 beds devoted 
to the treatment and training of the feeble minded and epileptics. 
Dr. Frank W. Keating is the superintendent and is Instructor in 
Psycho -A sthenics in the University of Maryland. Sections of the 
Fourth Year class are sent to this hospital for instruction in the 
proper care of feeble minded and epileptics. 

44 



SPRING GROVE STATE HOSPITAL. 

This hospital is a state institution for the treatment of the insane. 
There are 750 beds. Dr. J. Percy Wade is superintendent Stu- 
dents of this school may be sent to this institution for instruction 
in the diagnosis and treatment of mental diseases. 

SPRINGFIELD STATE HOSPITAL. 

This large state institution for the treatment of mental diseases 
is situated at Sykesville, Md. There are accommodations for 1300 
patients. Dr. J. Clement Clark, the superintendent, is also Asso- 
ciate Professor of Psychiatry in the University of Maryland. 

THE SHEPPARD AND ENOCH PRATT HOSPITAL FOR THE INSANE. 

This excellent institution offers abundant material for the study 
of mental diseases. 

PASTEUR INSTITUTE OF BALTIMORE. 

Located at the Mercy Hospital. 

Director 
Professor N. G. KEIRLE, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

Associate Director 
HUBERT C. KNAPP, M.D. 

The Pasteur Department of the Mercy Hospital was founded by 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons for the preventive treatment 
of hydrophobia according to the Pasteur method. It is modeled 
after the Pasteur Institute of Paris. The method is the result of 
personal investigation at the institute ami is identical with that 
used in Paris. 

Without the Pasteur preventive treatment, the mortality from 
the bites of rabid animals is sixteen to twenty-five per cent. Of 
those treated by the Pasteur method the mortality is about one- 
thirteenth of one per cent. 

Patients should come without any delay direct to the Mercy 
Hospital, corner of Saratoga and Calvert Streets, here they will be 
received by the resident physician and supplied with suitable ac- 
commodations. The}' will be required to remain twenty-three days. 

Those applying for treatment should bring a certificate from the 
veterinarian or anyone who has made an examination of the animal. 

45 



The certificate should state whether the animal had rabies or was 
only suspected to have had it. 

Persons bitten by animals suspected to be rabid should make an 
especial effort to have the animal kept under observation to deter- 
mine whether it has rabies. If the animal is dead, the whole body 
or the head, with part of the neck attached, should be sent to the 
laboratory at the College for investigation. To prevent putre- 
faction, it should be packed in ice and sent at once by express, 
prepaid. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY. 

This department of the University Hospital furnishes a most 
abundant supply of material for clinical instruction. During the 
past year the number of visits made by patients to the various 
departments of the Dispensary was 27,181. 

The whole department is arranged and thoroughly organized to 
facilitate the classification of the patients coming under treatment 
and their distribution to the various professors giving clinical lectures. 

During the intervals between the sessions the regular clinics are 
continued in the amphitheater, and there is also, each day, a bedside 
clinic in the hospital and service in the Dispensary. It will thus be 
seen that the school offers unusual facilities for clinical study dur- 
ing its regular session, and that the continuance of the clinics during 
the year affords opportunity to such students and graduates as can 
spend their time in the city. 

Attention is called to the fact that during the intervals between 
the sessions, from June to October, students have the advantage of 
three hours of clinical instruction daily, between the hours of 11 a.m. 
and 2 p.m. 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY. 

The Maryland General Hospital Dispensary treats 18,000 indigent 
patients annually, and supplies this school with an inexhaustible 
clinic for the instruction of its students. In the outdoor depart- 
ment of the dispensary, advanced students visit and treat patients 
at their homes, under the direction of the dispensary physician or 
his assistants. 

DISPENSARY OF THE COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

The Dispensary Rooms are located on the lower floors of the 
College building. Separate rooms are set apart for the different 
clinics, general and special. A dispensary staff is in attendance 

46 



.,." 



from 9.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. A large number of patients are avail- 
able for clinical instruction. The value of this dispensary can be 
appreciated by the fact that the number of patients was 7,956 and 
the number of visits 21,280 during the year ended January 1, 1915. 
The third and fourth year classes are subdivided into small sections, 
and several sections are assigned daily to work in the Dispensary. 

RESIDENT STUDENTS. 

Accommodations are provided in dormitories adjacent to the 
University Hospital for resident students. To these are assigned 
wards in the hospital, with attendance upon the sick, under the 
daily supervision of the professors and resident house officers. 
Special attention is called to the fact that in this institution under- 
graduates are permitted to enjoy the very great advantages of con- 
stant observation of the sick and of receiving daily bedside instruc- 
tion from the members of the Faculty. Rotation in ward service is 
the rule adopted, in order that the experience of the students may 
be as varied as possible. 



LABORATORIES 



ANATOMICAL LABORATORY. 

This laboratory is in charge of Associate Professor Holland and 
his assistants. It occupies an entire floor of one of the labo- 
ratory buildings and has in addition a smaller room for section 
teaching. The University has recently built its own storage and 
embalming plant, which supplies an abundance of anatomical mate- 
rial. The museum affords a large collection of both wet and dry 
specimens which are used in teaching. There is also a considerable 
amount of material in comparative anatomy. Dissecting tickets 
must be countersigned as an evidence of satisfactory dissecting. 

Anatomical material is furnished in abundance free of charge. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of the Professor 
of Analytical Chemistry, aided by the Demonstrators. Each stu- 
dent during his course has assigned him a table and is fully supplied, 

47 



with all necessary apparatus and chemicals, free of charge, except 
for breakage, which is charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department. 

LABORATORY OF PRACTICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped with the latest and most improved 
apparatus. 

Each student is trained to become familiar with the phenomena 
of life by objective and personal study. 

An abundant supply of material is provided for experiment and 
demonstration. 

The laboratory is also well adapted for post-graduat« study and 
special research in Physiology, for which opportunity will be given 
under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteins as well as a detailed course in the 
chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which may result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 
The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, will be 
given the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

This laboratory is equipped for teaching Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

There is a large collection of charts, specimens and apparatus used 
in teaching. The necessary equipment for the practice of technique 
is provided. 

LABORATORIES OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

The subject of special bacteriology is taught during a portion of 
the second year in a well equipped laboratory containing sterilizers, 
water baths, and other necessary equipment for this purpose. 

48 



The subject of histopathology is also taught during the second 
year in a properly equipped laboratory. The details concerning 
this work .-ire described under the subjeci of "Department of Path- 
ology and Bacteriology. 

The instruction in gross pathology is obtained during the third 
year by attendance upon the autopsies at the University Hospital, 
the Mercy Hospital, and the Maryland General Hospital, anrl 
special instruction in this subject is also given by demonstrations with 
a large amount of pathological material at the City Hospitals situ- 
ated at Bay View. The subject of gross pathology is also taught 
in the third year by means of lectures and demonstrations to sec- 
tions of the third year class and a special effort is made to apply 
(his subject to the explanation of the symptoms and clinical signs 
of disease. The instruction in autopsy technique is also given 
personally to small groups of students. 

LABORATORY OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped for the study of practical labo- 
ratory work in its relationship to clinical medicine. Each student 
is supplied with a locker, containing a microscope and sufficient 
apparatus for any ordinary examination. 

The wards and out-patient departments of the University and 
allied hospitals furnish an abundance of material for study. 

By reason of individual equipment, much work outside of class 
hours is expected of the student. 

The class room is adequately lighted, and is conveniently situ- 
ated for teaching purposes. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase from 
his widow of the collection of books of Dr. John Crawford, now 
.contains 12,610 volumes, 76 current journals and several thousand 
pamphlets' and reprints. During the year ending June 1, 1915, 614 
volumes were added. It is open daitv during the year, except in 
August, for the use of members of the Faculty, students and the 
profession generally. Books may be taken out without charge by 
making a deposit of three dollars. It is well stocked with recent 
literature and the more commodious quarters acquired in Davidge 
Hall have promoted very much its growth and usefulness. 

49 



The College of Physicians and Surgeons Library, under the 
charge of a Librarian, is open daily. It includes 2,000 volumes, 
and in addition the important medical journals, domestic and foreign 
can be found upon its shelves. 

Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (181,000 volumes), 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library (280,000 volumes) and the Library 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. The last named library 
receives the leading medical publications of the world and complete 
sets of many journals are available. 

The libraries are open to students of the Medical School without 
charge. 

The nearness of Washington puts the immense libraries of the 
national capital at the disposal of students of this school. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a separate apartment in the main build- 
ing. It is under the care of the curator, Prof. J. Holmes Smith 
and his assistants It contains a large collection of anatomical prep- 
arations, plaster casts, charts, models, etc., used in teaching anatomy. 
It contains also a number of specimens of comparative anatomy. 
There is a large collection of gross pathological specimens and cut 
sections mounted for demonstration. For the department of obstet- 
rics, there is an excellent collection of normal and abnormal human 
embryos. 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Two monthly journals are published by the University. The 
University Gazette is devoted to the interests of the entire University 
and is published under the auspices of the General Alumni Asso- 
ciation. The Hospital Bulletin is the publication of the Medical 
School. Dr. Nathan Winslow is editor. 

The Journal of the Alumni Association of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons is published quarterly. Dr. Charles E. Brack is the 
business manager. 

DENTAL INFIRMARY. 

The Dental Department of the University of Maryland is situated 
upon the University grounds, fronting on Greene Street, and adjoin- 
ing the building of the School of Medicine. 

Daily clinics are held in this department in the afternoon from 
2 to 5 o'clock, which are open to students of the School of Medicine, 
and offer excellent opportunities to students intending to practice 
in the country to familiarize themselves with dental operations. 

50 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

By arrangements recently concluded becween the two institutions, 
the Maryland College of Pharmacy, established in 1841, and widely 
and favorably known as one of the oldest and most prominent of 
the institutions of its kind in this country, has become the Depart- 
ment of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland, and now occupies 
buildings upon the University grounds. 

The lectures and laboratories in this Department will afford to 
students of the School of Medicine who expect to practice in the 
country, opportunities of acquiring a knowledge of correct methods 
of dispensing medicines which will be of much value in their future 
practice. 

Special courses of instructions in the laboratories of Pharmacy 
may be arranged for upon payment of a moderate fee. 

ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons. 
Four Resident Physicians. 
Two Resident Gynecologists. 
Two Resident Pathologists. 
Three Resident Obstetricians. 

TO THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

One Chief of House Staff. 
Two Resident Physicians. 
Five Resident Surgeons. 
One Resident Obstetrician. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Superintendent . 

Six Resident Surgeons. 

Five Resident Physicians. 

One Resident Gynecologist. 

One Resident Obstetrician. 

Two Accident Service Residents. 

One Ambulance Surgeon. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of the 
session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital. The fee 
for such hospital residence is one hundred and fifty dollars per year, 
payable in advance. This covers lodging, light and heat. 

51 



Many appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of this school are eligible. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination, or both, and is essential for admis- 
sion to any class. 

The requirements for the issue of the Medical Student Certificate 
are those prescribed by the rules of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, 
and comprise: 

(A) The completion of a standard four-year high school course, 
or its equivalent, and, in addition, 

(B) One year of college credits in chemistry, biology, physics 
and French or German. 

(A) THE HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENT. 

(1) A diploma and transcript of record from a fully accredited 
high school, normal school or academy requiring for admission evi- 
dence of the completion of a standard course in primary and inter- 
mediate grades and for graduation, the completion of a standard 
four-year high school course, embracing two years (2 units) of math- 
ematics, two years (2 units) of English, two years (2 units) of a 
foreign language, one year (1 unit) of American History and Civics 
and seven years (7 units) of further credit in language, literature, 
history or science, making the total of units at least fourteen; or, 

(2) An examination in the following branches totaling 14 units: 

(1) Required, 7 units. Uniu. 
Mathematics — (Minimum 2 years ; maximum 3 years) Algebra and 

plane geometry 2 

English— (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years) 2 

A Foreign Language— (Minimum 2 years; maximum 4 years)... 2 

U. S. History 1 

Total required units 7 

52 



(2) Elective, 7 units. To be selected from the following 

English 

Mathematics, Algebra. Solid Geometry, Trigonomentry 

Latin, Greek, German, French, Spanish, Scandinavian 1 

History (foreign) 

Science, Botany, Zoology, ( 'hi mistry, etc 

Agriculture 

Drawing 

Manuel Training 

Domestic Science 

If us ic 



One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subject for four 
or five periods per week for a year of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to be 
not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 2 semester 
credits or 2 points. 

(B) THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college year shall extend through one college 
session of at least thirty-two weeks of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college year snail be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man year in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college j T ear shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and German or French, each course to embrace 
at least eight semester hours of didactic and laboratory work in 
each subject as shown in the schedule below, provided that a student 
may satisfy the requirement of physics in presenting one unit of 
high school physics and completing a half year of college physics 
which continues and does not duplicate the work done in the high 
school. 

Provided also, that a student may satisfy the requirement of French 
or German by presenting two units of regular high school work in 
either language and completing a half year of college work in that 
language, which continues and does not duplicate the work done 
in the high school, or by presenting three units of regular high school 
work in French or German. 

In the administration of the entrance requirements of the pre- 
liminary college year conditions may be allowed until September 
1917, amounting to not more than one-half of the requirement in 
physics and one-half of the requirement in a modern language. 

53 



Schedule 



LECTURES OR LABORATORY TOTAL HOURS TOTAL 8EME8- 

RECTTATIONS PERIODS PER TER HOURS 

PER WEEK PER WEEK SEMESTER PER YEAR 



Physics (1) 2 

Chemistry (1) 2 

Biology (1) 2 or 3 

German or French (2) . . . . 4 or 3 

Total 




6 or 5 



16 or 15 



Each laboratory period must extend over at least two hours. 



32 or 30 



Or, expressed in class hours 



TOTAL HOURS 
LECTURES OR 
RECITATION* 



Physics (1) 64 

Chemistry (1) 64 

Biology (1) 64 or 96 

German or French (2) j 128 or 96 



Total 



320 



TOTAL HOURS 

LABORATORY 

WORK 



128 

128 

128 or 64 



TOTAL MINI- 
MUM HOURS 
DIDACTIC AND 
LABORATORY 



192 

192 

128 or 160 
128 or 96 



384 or 320 704 or 640 



All such conditions shall be removed before registration for the 
second year. 

The valuation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 
iner only, and all students whose entrance qualifications are not clearly 
satisfactory, or whose certificates are not complete, are advised to 
obtain from him or from the Dean blank forms on which to prepare 
a full statement of their previous education, in advance of their 
coming to Baltimore. Such statements to be submitted to the 
Entrance Examiner for his advice as to the course to be pursued. 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Otis, Hall 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of Maryland, 1211 Cathedral 
Street, Baltimore. To him must be submitted the credentials of 
all applicants, and by him is issued the certificate upon which the 
student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 
medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 



54 



ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course future difficul- 
ties may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, without 
being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examination, 
may receive a certificate of attendance. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, is by contract 
of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of Arts and 
Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's College 
and who have made an approved choice of electives may if they desire 
it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical School of the 
University. If they successfully complete the work of the first med- 
ical year they are graduated with their class with the degree of A B . 
from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work of 
the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and for 
four years he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seven years the M.D. degree, but credit from the Med- 
ical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit has already 
been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

In order to meet the increased requirements for matriculation 
taking effect January 1, 1914, a special Pre-Medical Course in Chem- 
istry, Physics, Biology and French or German is now offered in 
St. John's College. 

GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica 
and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $125. 

RULES. 

1. Tickets for practical anatomy must be countersigned by the 
proper demonstrators. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket 
will not be accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

55 



2. All students are required to stand the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. Xo student will be permitted to enter 
the third-year class who has not completed all first-year work, and 
no student will be permitted to enter the fourth-year class who has 
not completed all second-year work, nor shall a student be ad- 
vanced from a lower to a higher class if he is conditioned in more 
than one major and one minor subject. 

3. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
Dean before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

4. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course 
lie must pay regular fees. 

5. A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the 
fourth year and to take examinations in such other branches as may 
be required, should he be permitted to again enter the school as a 
candidate for graduation. 

6. Students are required to pay for breakage and to make a de- 
posit on this account. The unexpended balance will be returned 
at the end of the session. 

7. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his final 
examination. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1916, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees and all 
the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year) $5 . 00 

Tuition fee (each year) 165 . 00 

Graduation fee 30.00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, or 
for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases for 
materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the entire 
amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tuition 
fee for that year will be $160. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this insti- 

56 



tution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning Octo- 
ber 1, 1915. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first full 
course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses, $25 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as a 
memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this Uni- 
versity, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, "to 
a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the judg- 
ment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pecuniary 
assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year stu- 
dent only, who has successfully completed one year's work in the 
medical course, and no student may hold such scholarship for more 
than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles M. 
Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the Fac- 
ulty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of inability 
to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

57 



It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to "a 
needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by the 
Faculty of Physic to a student of the Senior Class who presents to 
the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and that 
he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the tuitiou 
fee of that year. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS. 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of students' personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books 

College Incidentals 


$ 18 

96 
48 
35 
10 


$ 32 
5 
112 
65 
50 
20 


$ 50 

10 
128 


Room rent 

Clothing and washing 

All other expenses 


80 
100 
75 


Total . 


$207 


$284 


$443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the city 
by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University grounds, 
N. E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the Superinten- 
dent of buildings, who may be found at his office on the premises, 

58 



will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient boarding 
houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts for students. 

For. further information, apply to either 

Arthuk M. Shipley, M.D., Acting Dean, 

University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 

Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D., Dean, 

College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 



The following curriculum is the result of a recent and thorough 
revision of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialities in medicine and surgery 
necessitates a very crowded course and the question of electives is one 
which very soon will be depended on to solve some of the difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under ten departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Chemistry including Physiological Chemistry. 

4. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

5. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

6. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

7. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

8. Obstetrics. 

9. Gynecology. 

10. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Each year consists of thirty-two weeks and is divided into two 
semesters. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body and laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

59 



Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of teachers insures attention to the needs 
of each student. 

In many courses the final examinations as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 
largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work car- 
ried on throughout the course. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY INCLUDING HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

A. C. Pole, M.D Professor of Descriptive Anatomy 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D. ..Professor of Histology and Embryology 

J. W. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

J. L. Wright, M.D Associate in Anatomy and Histology 

Alfred Ullman, M.D Associate in Anatomy 

W. G. Queen, M.D Lecturer in Osteology 

Fred. Rankin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

C. W. Rauschenbach, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Anatomy. 

First Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. 

This course embraces the integuments, myology, angiology, oste- 
ology, syndesmology and the peripheral nerves. 

Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in his 
work by competent demonstrators. Examinations are held at regu- 
lar intervals throughout the session, and each student will be held 
to strict account for material furnished him. 

Osteology. Two hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Lectures, 
demonstrations and recitations. Each student is furnished a skele- 
ton and a deposit is required to insure its return at the end of the 
session. 

Second Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty-two 
weeks. Lectures, recitations and conferences. 

60 



Laboratory. Twelve hours each week for sixteen weeks. This 
course includes topographical and applied anatomy of the body cav- 
ities and viscera and the cerebro-spinal and sympathetic nervous 
systems with special demonstrations of important subjects to the 
class in small sections. 

The teaching of anatomy is illustrated by means of charts, dia- 
grams, special dissections and the projection apparatus. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, nine 
hours each week during first semester; three hours each week during 
second semester. The most important part of the work will be done 
in the laboratory, where each student will be provided with a micro- 
scope, apparatus, staining fluids and material necessary for the 
preparation of specimens for microscopical examination. An im- 
portant aid to the course is the projection microscope which is 
used for the projection upon a screen of magnified images of the 
specimens actually used in the laboratory. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; six hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick, 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryology. In the 
laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages of 
development, and sections of the chick at different periods of incu- 
bation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter part 
of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through dif- 
ferent regions of a mammal. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

John C. Hemmetbr, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Physiology 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B.,Ph.D Professor of Physiology and Biology 

C. C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D Associate in Physiology 

Firmadge K. Nicols, A.B., M.D Associate in Physiology 

Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D Associate in Physiology 

First Year. 1. General Biology. This course is designed to serve 
as a practical introduction to the course in physiology and aims to 
acquaint the student with the elementary forms, forces, and laws 
of living nature upon which practically all medical science is depen- 

61 



dent. First half year, lectures and conferences three hours a week. 
Laboratory four hours a week. Professor McGlone and Dr. Nichols. 

2. Physiology. This course follows the course in General Biology 
and includes the physiology of blood, circulation, respiration, and 
a portion of the nervous sj^stem. Second half year, lectures and 
conferences three hours a week. Professor McGlone. 

Second Year. 3. Advanced Physiology, Biochemistry and Bio- 
physic^. This course covers the entire field of physiology in a series 
of lectures, recitations, demonstrations and conferences that is based 
upon an already acquired knowledge of the elements of this science 
as given under No. 1 and 2. The doctrines and theories of modern 
physiology as far as they give promise of fruitful development of 
this science are discussed and weekly conferences are held between 
the classes and the teacher. 

It is impossible to itemize the various topics that are discussed 
in this course, only the more important can be mentioned, for ex- 
ample: the Ionic hypothesis — the theory of solutions (Van't Hoff — 
Arrhenius — J. H. Hamburger — DeVries) and its relation to biochem- 
istry. The theories of immunity (Metschnikoff — Ehrlich) — the tro- 
pisms especially — the doctrine of neuro-chemic coordination and its 
bearing to pharmaco-tropism, etc., etc., are made comprehensible to 
the student. Lectures and conferences three hours a week. Pro- 
fessor John C. Hemmeter assisted by Associate Professor Conser. 

4. Experimental Biophysics and Biochemistry. This is a purely 
Laboratory course in the dynamics of muscle and nerve, nervous 
system, circulation and respiration, digestion-metabolism, excretion, 
secretion, etc. The field covered is that as outlined in Hemmeter's 
Manual of Practical Physiology. Laboratory six hours a week for five 
months. Professor McGlone, Drs. Conser, G. W. Hemmeter, Nichols 
and Collenberg. 

5. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a Laboratory course 
intended for advanced Laboratory students (optional) who may wish 
to do special work in this line of physiology. Hours to be arranged. 
Professor McGlone. 

6. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students will be 
admitted to the laboratory which is well adapted for post-graduate 
study and special research. Hours will be arranged to suit individ- 
uals. Professor John C. Hemmeter. 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

W. Simon, Ph.D., M.D., Sc.D Professor of Chemistry 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

G.Howard White, A.B.,M.D. Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate in Physiological Chemistry 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D Associate in Chemistry 

First Year Organic Chemistry. 1. Lectures and Recitations; 
two hours per week throughout the session. 

The method adopted for the study of carbon compounds is to 
lead the student from the consideration of the most simply consti- 
tuted bodies to those of more and more complex composition. Much 
stress will be laid on the reasons which justify the adoption of the 
prevalent views in regard to the structure of carbon compounds. 
During the study of the various groups those substances which are 
of more general interest to the medical student will be specially 
considered. 

2. Laboratory work Four hours per week during the session. 

A course of carefully selected experiments, performed by the 
student in the laboratory serves to impart a clear idea of the mani- 
fold changes which organic compounds undergo. He learns here 
much by witnessing the actual building up of complex carbon com- 
pounds by synthetical methods and sees the breaking down of others 
into simpler forms of matter. 

Second Year. Organic and Physiological Chemistry. 1. Lectures 
and recitations. One hour per week throughout the session. 

This course includes the study of general organic chemistry with 
special attention to the more important carbon compounds which 
are of particular importance to the student of medicine, with refer- 
ence to their relations to physiology, pathology and clinical medi- 
cine. Professor Simon. 

2. Laboratory Work. Six hours per week for one semester. 

This includes a study of the properties of the food stuffs, their 
decomposition and metabolic products, digestion, the blood, chem- 
istry of the secretions and excretions, and the various abnormal 
compounds resulting from perverted metabolism. The student will 
be expected to familiarize himself with the manipulation of the 
apparatus in use in the study of the various secretions, excretions 
and fluids of the body. Associate Professor Whitney. 

Special Courses. Original Investigation. Graduates and ad- 
vanced students competent to undertake such work, who desire to 

63 



pursue special chemical investigation, will be given the opportunity, 
under suitable regulations, with the advice and assistance of the 
Instructors of the Department. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Samuel J. Fort, M.D. . .Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology 

E. L. Whitney, M.D Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

H. L. Sinsky, M.D Associate in Materia Medica 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate in Pharmacology 

First Year Two hours per week throughout the session, didactic 
lectures on Materia Medica. Professor Fort. 

A laboratory course in Pharmacy and prescription writing, two 
hours per week. Dr. Sinsky. 

Second Year. Two hours per week throughout the session on 
Pharmacology. Professor Fort. 

A laboratory course of two hours per week throughout the session, 
on the physiological and toxicological action of the more important 
drugs. Associate Professor Whitney and Dr. Wylie. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

H. R. Spencer, M.D.. .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 
Wm. Greenfeld, M.D.. . .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 
Caleb W. G. Rohrer, A.M., M.D., PhD. . .Associate Professor of Pathology 

Harry W. Stoner, M.D Associate in Patholog3 r and Bacteriology 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Associate in Bacteriology 

Instruction in histopathology and in special bacteriology is given 
in the laboratories to the students of the second year The course 
in histopathology includes the demonstrations of the common 
lesions of the various viscera and the subject of general pathology 
including inflammation, degeneration and infiltration and tumors. 
The typical gross lesions are also exhibited during this course. 

In special bacteriology the various methods of sterilization and 
preparation of culture material, the study of the pathogenic micro- 
organisms both of animal and vegetable origin, and the bacteriologi- 
cal study of milk, water, sewage and other such materials, are given. 
The bacteriological diagnosis of the infectious diseases is also included 
in this course. Animal inoculations and autopsies are performed 
in connection with the bacteria studied and the diagnosis of serum 
reactions and vaccine therapy are also given. 

64 



In the third year the subject of gross pathology is taught by means 
of museum specimens to groups of students and the special relation- 
ship of gross and microscopic lesions to clinical symptoms and signs 
of disease is especially emphasized. Autopsy technique is also 
taught to small groups of students by special instruction at the autop- 
sies performed at the various hospitals and the specimens obtained 
at such autopsies are demonstrated to the entire class. 

Second Year. Bacteriology. Ten hours a week for eleven weeks. 
Lectures 30 hours. Laboratory work 110 hours. Total 140 hours. 

Pathology. This subject is taught in the second year in the fol- 
lowing manner. Lectures 64 hours. Laboratory work 180 hours. 
Total 244 hours. 

Third Year. Applied Gross and Microscopic Pathology. Four 
hours weekly for ten weeks each to three sections of the third year 
class. Total 40 hours. 

Autopsy technique one hour weekly to the entire class. Total 
30 hours. Gross Pathology in City Hospitals at Bay View two hours 
weekly to three sections of class. Total 20 hours. 

Total laboratory hours in pathology for second and third year 270. 

Fourth Year. Clinical and Pathological Conferences. One hour 
a week throughout the year. Total 30 hours. 

The specimens from autopsies are studied with reference to clinical 
histories and gross and microscopic anatomy. Special emphasis 
is laid upon the correlation of the anatomical findings with the clini- 
cal symptoms and diagnosis. The demonstrations are also illustrated 
with sections of fixed material by means of a lantern upon a screen. 

Courses in surgical and gynecological pathology are also given to 
the fourth year students, but these courses are under the direction 
of the Departments of Surgery and Gynecology. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HYGIENE 

Nathaniel G. Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 
Joseph T. Smith, M.D Professor of Hygiene 

Second Year. One hour each week for entire session. 

Medical Jurisprudence. This course embraces consideration of 
medical evidence and testimony, confidential communications, 
malpractice, indications of death, pregnancy, delivery, infanticide 
and insanity. 

65 



Hygiene. This course embraces consideration of impurities in 
air, purification of air, lighting, heating, purification of water, fil- 
tration, removal of waste, disposal of sewerage, disinfectants, practi- 
cal disinfection, food, preservation of food, beverages, exercise and 
clothing. 

CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND SCHOOL OF MEDICINE. 
DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Surgical Pathology 

Ridqely B. Warfield, M.D Professor of Practice of Surgery 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D.'. Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. D. Blake, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

John G. Jay, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

J. W. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Associate in Clinical Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate in Clinical Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate in Surgery 

A. G. Barrett, M.D Demonstrator of Surgery 

F. J. Kirby, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Fred Rankin, A.M., M.D Instructor in Surgery 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

Howard D. Lewis, M.D., Instructor in Surgery 

Harry L. Kolseth, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

J. D. Bubert, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

The course in surgery is progressive and aims to ground the stu- 
dent firmly in the principles of surgical science in order that later 
he may be prepared to build upon a firm foundation the superstruc- 
ture of surgical art. 

Second Year. During this year a practical course of bandaging is 
given upon the manikin; the student being required to apply person- 
ally the various forms of bandages to the different parts of the body. 

Third Year. Surgical Pathology and Principles of Surgery. 
Lectures, recitations and clinics, three hours weekly at the Uni- 
versity Hospital. Professor Shipley. 

The class is divided in sections and receives instruction in history 
taking, gross surgical pathology and surgical diagnosis at the bed- 
side and in the dead house in the City Hospitals at Bay View. Pro- 
fessor Shipley and Dr. Lynn. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 

66 



the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections and each 
section is given practical and individual work under the supervision 
of the instructors. 

This course begins with the study of the general principles of 
operative surgery; anaesthesia, asepsis, antisepsis, description of in- 
struments and sutures, etc. 

The various operations are first described and demonstrated by the 
instructor, and the student afterward practices them upon the subject. 

The entire subject of operative surgery is fully covered. Professors 
Martin, Clinical Professor N. Winslow and Dr. R. P. Bay. 

Attendance upon surgical clinics and upon dispensary service is 
also expected when the student is not engaged in class work at the 
same hour. 

Fourth Year. Practice of Surgery. Illustrated by charts, drawings, 
pathological specimens, x-ray demonstrations, lantern slides and the 
balopticon, three hours a week. Professors Winslow and Warfield. 

Surgical Clinics. Operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, three 
hours a week to entire class. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin and Blake. 

The class is divided into sections for ward instruction in surgery, 
for instruction in operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, and the 
post-operative treatment of surgical conditions, four days a week 
for two hours each day. Professors Winslow, Shipley, Warfield, 
Martin and Blake. 

Dispensary instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of surgical 
ailments, two hours daily. 

The administration of anaesthetics is taught didactically and prac- 
tically and students are required to administer anaesthetics under 
the direction of an instructor. It is aimed to make the instruction 
during this year practical and to give the student first hand insight 
into the signs and treatment of surgical conditions. A large corps 
of able teachers and clinicians make it possible to give unusually 
close attention to the practical clinical instruction of each student. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Wm. Tarun, M.D .* Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. E. Peterman, M.D .Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

G. A. Fleming, M.D Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Edward A. Looper, M.D.,D.Oph. .Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology 

67 



Eye 

Third Year. Instruction in anatomy, physiology and optics, 
illustrated by models, drawings, lantern slides, sections, etc., one 
hour each week for the first half of the second semester. During 
the last half of the second semester the class is divided into groups 
for demonstrations by sections, specimens, etc. of the anatomy and 
by models, drawings, etc. of the physiology of the eye, one hour 
each week for each section, Clinical Professor Tarun. 

At the end of this course an examination will be held. 

Fourth Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on functional 
disorders and diseases of the eye; one hour each week for entire 
course, Professor Woods and Clinical Professor Tarun. 

Ear 

Lectures and recitations on anatomy, physiology and diseases of 
the ear, one hour each week during the first semester in addition 
to general clinic and section teaching mentioned below. Professor 
Crouch. 

Eye and Ear 

Clinical lectures and recitations in diseases of the Eye and Ear 
one hour each week during the first semester. Professor Woods. 

Clinical lectures and recitations in Diseases of the Eye and Ear one 
hour each week during the second semester. Professor Crouch 
and Clinical Professor Tarun. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are intended to ac- 
quaint students with the diagnosis of ordinary eye and ear diseases, 
their treatment and complications; also with the symptoms of re- 
mote troubles shown by anomalies in these two important special 
organs. The courses are didactic and clinical. At the weekly 
general clinic effort is made to show the students the class of cases 
presented during the week in didactic work. Furthermore, the 
class is divided into sections for more intimate instruction in dis- 
pensary work at the University Hospital. 

DERMATOLOGY 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D Associate in Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Demonstrator of Dermatology 

68 



Clinical conference one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of the 
skin. Professor Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in 
the diagnosis and treatment of the common skin diseases. Drs. 
Abercrombie, Ketron and Robinson. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Associate in Orthopedic Surgery 

Henry Chandlee, M.D Associate in Radiography 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

Geo. E. Bennett, M.D Instructor in Orthopedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction will be given in the University 
Hospital Amphitheater and Dispensary, Maryland General Hospital, 
Kernan Hospital and Industrial School for Crippled Children, and at 
" Radnor Park/' and Dispensary of same at 2000 North Charles 
Street. Twenty-eight weekly lectures will be given in the Univer- 
sity Amphitheater to the senior class as a whole and sections will 
be assigned to the out-patient and bed-side clinics. 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and instru- 
ments required in this surgical specialt}^, including x-ray technique; 
Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; deformities of the feet; 
non-tubercular diseases and deformities of bones and joints; the 
paralysis; the bursal, tendinous and muscular conditions producing 
orthopedic affections; rickets, scurvy, osteomalacia and chondro- 
dystrophies; wry-neck and the use and application of orthopedic 
apparatus. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

H. C. Davis, M.D Demonstrator of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

George Murqatroyd, M.D., Demonstrator in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Fourth Year. Clinical lectures. One hour each week through 
out the session. Professors Merrick and John R. Winslow. 

Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the University Hospital. Dr. Davis. 

Dispensary instruction in small sections, six hours each week at 
the Maryland General Hospital. Drs. Murgatroyd and Marr. 



GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. B. Wolf, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D Associate in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

This course is entirely clinical and is taught chiefly in the dis- 
pensary. The student assumes the responsibility of certain cases 
under the supervision of instructors. 

The course includes the diagnosis, pathology and treatment of 
venereal diseases and syphilis together with a careful study of the 
less common genito-urinary diseases. The course includes instruc- 
tion in urinalysis, in endoscopic and cystoscopic examinations and 
the use of other instruments for the diagnosis and treatment of 
genito-urinary diseases. Many minor operations are performed in 
the out-patient department. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D Associate in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Ernest G. Marr. M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This course is for instruction in diseases of the 
Colon, Sigmoid Flexure, Rectum, and Anus. 

One lecture a week throughout the year will be given in the Clini- 
cal Amphitheater of the University Hospital. The lectures will 
cover the essential features of the Anatomy, and Physiology of the 
large intestine; as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. 
The importance of diseased conditions and malpositions of the intes- 
tines, in relations to systemic disturbances, will be emphasized by 
demonstrations. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the amphitheater, 
wards and dispensaries of the University Hospital and the Maryland 
General Hospital, where different phases of the various diseases will 
be taught by direct observation and examination. The use of the 
proctoscope and sigmoidoscope in examination of the rectum and 
sigmoid will be made familiar to each student. 

A course in Proctoscopy will be given in the City Hospitals at 
Bay View, where abundance of material is always obtainable. 

The methods of treatment used in the office will be shown by 
treatment in the dispensary. Major and radical operative treatment 
will be given in the operating rooms in such manner that the student 
can be a part of it. 

70 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 

David Streett, A.M., M.D Professor of Practice of Medicine 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medicine 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D Professor of Experimental and Clinical Medicine 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D '.Professor of Clinical Medicine 

J. M. Craighill, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D Professor, of Clinical Medicine 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director of Clinic 

E. B. Freeman, B.Sc, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

W. I. Messick, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

William H. Smith, M.D , Associate in Clinical Medicine 

J. S. Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

R. C. Metzel, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

H. D. McCarty, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

J. E. O'Neill, M.D Associate in Clinical Medicine 

G. S. M. Kieefer, M.D Demonstrator of Medicine 

J. F. O'Mara, M.D Demonstrator of Medicine 

J. E. Brumback, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Isadore Hirschman, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Charles Rauschenbach, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations in 
medical topography and the physical conditions in health, preparatory 
to the course in physical diagnosis in the third year. Two and one- 
half hours each week during the second semester. 

Third Year. Didactic lectures and recitations on the principles 
of medicine, three hours a week throughout the session. Professor 
Wilson. 

Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences; two hours a 
week to entire class throughout the session. 

This course is supplementary to the lectures on the principles of 
medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Associate Professor Messick. 

Clinical Medicine. Conference and recitations; one hour each 
week to entire class throughout the session. This course is supple- 
mentary to the lectures on the principles of medicine. Dr. John E. 
O'Neill. 

Clinical conference; one hour each week throughout the session 
to the entire class. Professor Mitchell. 

71 



Physical Diagnosis. The class is divided into small groups, and 
each section receives instruction each week for the entire session in 
the medical dispensaries of the University and Maryland General 
Hospitals. During the second semester, the students under the super- 
vision of the instructors in medicine examine and treat patients 
in the medical dispensary. 

The class is divided into small groups and in the afternoons dur- 
ing one semester these groups are sent to the City Hospitals at Bay 
View and Maryland General Hospital for further instruction in his- 
tory taking and physical diagnosis, one hour each week. 

Fourth Year. Lectures, recitations and clinics, two hours a 
week to the entire class. Professors Streett and Wilson. 

Pathological-clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. 
Professors Adler and Stokes. 

Clinical conference, one hour a week to entire class. Professor 
Lockard. 

The class is divided into sections for medical ward class instruc- 
tion three hours each week throughut the session. Professors Streett , 
Adler, Craighill, Gichner, McEIfresh and Lockard. 

Clinical Clerk Service. Each man is required to study carefully a 
number of cases during the course for presentation at the medical 
ward classes and clinics. This includes a written history and phys- 
ical examination and examination of urine, blood, stomach contents 
and faeces. Professors Streett and Lockard. 

Dispensary Instruction. The medical dispensary is open daily from 
12 to 1 p.m., and the class is divided into small groups for practical 
instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of medical ailments. The 
dispensaries at the University and at the Maryland General Hospi- 
tals are available for this work. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D Professor of Pediatrics 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D Professor of Clinical Pediatrics 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D Associate Professor of Pediatrics 

J. Somerville Fischer, A.B., M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

J. E. Poulton, M.D Associate in Pediatrics 

John A. Fenby, M.D Assistant in Pediatrics 

Fourth Year' Lectures and recitations two hours each week to 
entire class. Professors Mitchell, O'Donovan and Hirsh. 

72 



Clinical conference, one hour each week at University Hospital. 
Professor Mitchell. 

The class is divided into groups and receives clinical instruction at 
the Maryland General Hospital and St. Vincent's Infant Asylum, 
three groups each week. Professor 'Donovan and assistants. 

Dipensary instruction daily at the University Hospital. Prof. 
Hirsh, Dr. Douglas and Dr. Rauschenbach. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D Professor of Physical Therapeutics 

Wm. I. Messick, M.D Associate Professor of Therapeutics 

Third Year. Applied Therapeutics. Lectures and conferences. 
Two hours a week to entire class throughout the session. 

This course is supplementary to the lectures on the Principles of 
Medicine, and an effort is made to familiarize the student with the 
practical treatment of disease. Associate Professor Messick. 

Physical Therapeutics. This course consists of weekly lectures and 
demonstrations on hydrotherapy, thermotherapy, massage, rest 
and exercise, the Weir Mitchell Treatment, radiotherapy and elec- 
trotherapeutics. The basic physiologic principles and actions of the 
above mentioned agencies are given full consideration and study, 
and the practical application is observed in the hospital and clinic 
and in visits to various institutions having well equipped depart- 
ments for treatment by physical means. A few lectures on sugges- 
tions are also given as the subject properly belongs to such a course. 
Professor Gichner. 

Fourth Year. Applied Therapeutics. During this year instruc- 
tion in the treatment of diseased conditions by remedial agents 
forms a large part of the teaching of medicine and the medical 
specialties. 

DISEASES OF THE STOMACH AND INTESTINES AND OF METABOLISM 

John C. Hemmbter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A. H. Carroll, M.D Associate in Gastro-Enterology 

J. Harry Ulrich, M.D Instructor in Gastro-Enterology 

This course consists of an out patient department or polyclinic in 
which the students of the graduating class are assigned weekly upon 
cases which they are directed to study and examine thoroughly and to 
report in person to the principal clinic once a week. 

73 



All physical, chemical and microscopic work is done by the student 
himself and the report is read, with the presentation of the patient, 
which is followed by a conference with the director of the clinic. 
Many of these reports were of such merit that they were published 
in the Hospital Bulletin, and they are made to figure in forming the 
general average of the student. 

In addition to the ordinary diseases of the gastro-intestinal tract, 
thio course embraces diseases of the soft tissues of the mouth and of 
the esophagus; gastroscopy; esophagoscopy and duodenal intubation. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D Professor in Neurology 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D Associate in Neurology 

Milton P. Hill, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Harry A. Bishop, M.D Assistant in Neurology 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations; one hour each week to 
entire class throughout the year. This course comprises the study of 
the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the methods of 
neurological examination and relationship of signs and symptoms to 
pathological conditions. The material at the University, Maryland 
General and City Hospitals is available. 

Foubth Ybar. Clinical lectures and recitations; one hour each 
week throughout the entire session. 

Clinical Conference, one hour each week to the entire class. This 
subject is taught at the University, Maryland General and City Hos- 
pitals at Bay View. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully 
examined; complete written records are made by the students 
who demonstrate the case before the class. These cases are usually 
assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and each student 
in the class must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections, two hours each week 
during entire year at the University and Maryland General Hospi- 
tals. In these classes the students come in close personal contact 
with the cases in the wards under the supervision of the instructors. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the dis- 
pensary, four afternoons each week, in this way students are brought 
in contact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well as later man- 
ifestations. 

74 



Electro Therapeutics. Instruction in the uses of the various types 
of electrical apparatus is given by lectures and demonstrations in 
the clinics, ward classes and out patient department. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

E. L. Whitney M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology 

IT. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate in Clinical Pathology 

H. U. Todd, M.D Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology 

H. Boyd Wtlie, M.D Demonstrator in Clinical Pathology 

Leo Karlinsky, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 

This is a practical laboratory course, with a portion of the time 
devoted to lectures. Eleven hours each week for one semester. 

The practical application of chemistry, physical chemistry, physi- 
ology and microscopy to the diagnosis and study of disease is taught. 
Each student is required to make examinations of stomach contents, 
faeces, blood, urine, sputum, and exudates and transudates. Especial 
effort is made to show the relation of laboratory findings to the his- 
tory and course of the disease as observed in clinical work. Haema- 
tology is taken up and haematological technique taught. Parasi- 
tology and its bearing on clinical medicine is considered. Serum 
changes in disease and immunity are also carefully outlined. 

TUBERCULOSIS OF THE LUNGS. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D Professor of Principles of Medicine 

John E. O'Neill, M.D Chief of Clinic 

A practical course is given in the Dispensary and at the Municipal 
Tuberculosis Hospital to small groups in the diagnosis and treat- 
ment of pulmonary tuberculosis. The abundance of the material, 
both in incipient and advanced cases, makes this course of value in 
the practical recognition of the physical signs of the disease. 

MENTAL DISEASES. 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Clement Clark, M.D Associate Professor of Psychiatry 

J. Percy Wade, M.D Associate in Psychiatry 

Frank W. Keating, M.D Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D Lecturer on Psychiatry 

Fourth Year. This course includes clinical lectures at the City 
Detention Hospital, Spring Grove Asylum, Springfield State Hos- 
pital, ML Hope Retreat and the Maryland Training School for the 
Feeble Minded. 

75 



STATE MEDICINE. 
John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D Professor of State Medicine 

Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations; one hour each week 
to the entire class throughout the session. 

The course in state medicine begins with a study of structure and 
function of the social organism, as revealed by the numerical analy- 
sis of population, births, deaths, sickness and migration. Elementary 
instruction and practice are given in vital statistics; in medical noti- 
fication, registration and certification; and in the laws and ordinances 
concerning public health. The specific hygiene of the preventable 
diseases is next taken up, such choice being made as will familiarize 
the student with the epidemiology of the more important communi- 
cable diseases, and with the main instruments of prevention; notifi- 
cation, inspection, segregation, isolation, immunization and disinfec- 
tion. The course is planned from the viewpoint of official practice 
in public hygiene. 

TROPICAL MEDICINE. 

James A. Nydegger, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., Surgeon U.S.P.H. Service, Profes- 
sor of Tropical Medicine 

A course of lectures on tropical diseases to the Senior class was 
instituted in January, 1913, and continued during the remainder of 
the scholastic year. Eminent authorities on various subjects of this 
important branch of medicine delivered lectures during the course, 
and will continue to deliver lectures during the coming year; one 
hour each week to the Senior class. 

This addition to the curriculum has been made because of the in- 
creasing importance of Tropical Diseases; because of the large num- 
ber of students from southern states attending the school, and be- 
cause a large number of graduates of this school enter the U. S. 
Public Health Service and the Army and Navy Medical Corps, and 
many find employment as civil practitioners in tropical and sub- 
tropical countries. 

The course includes a thorough and comprehensive discussion of 
the history, etiology, pathology, morbid anatomy, differential diag- 
nosis, treatment and prophylaxis (with lantern slide illustrations) of 
the more important tropical diseases, such as amebic and bacillary 
dysentery, Asiatic cholera, plague, yellow fever, trypanosomiasis 
(sleeping sickness) filariasis, piroplasmosis, beri beri, dengue, pellagra, 
leprosy, hook-worm, bilharzia, rocky mountain or tick fever, sprue, 

76 



spirochetosis, etc., and a study of the various parasites affecting 
both man and animals. 

Clinical lectures, presentation of cases, exhibition of specimens and 
practical methods of demonstrating the protozoa and parasites caus- 
ing tropical diseases will also be given. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

L. E. Neale, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

II. M. Freeman, M.D Chief of Out-patient Department 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each week by 
Professors Neale and Rowland to entire class. 

Special obstetric and gynaecologic pathology, two hours each week 
by Professor Hirsh and H. J. Maldeis to class sections in the Path- 
ologic laboratory. 

Obstetric diagnosis (clinical) three hours each week at University 
of Maryland Hospital by Professor Neale and three hours each week at 
Maryland Lying-in Hospital by Professor Rowland to class sections. 

At the end of this year there will be a written examination cover- 
ing the subject as taught which will count one-half of the final grade 
in Obstetrics. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each week 
to the entire class. Professors Neale and Rowland. 

Operative obstetrics (manikin work) one hour each week by Pro- 
fessor Neale and assistants to class sections. 

Students are required to attend obstetric cases before, during and 
after confinement both in the University Hospital and the Maryland 
Lying-in Hospital as well as the out patient department associated 
with both hospitals and each student will be required to conduct and 
make accurate records of at least ten confinement cases seen under 
the personal supervision of one of the physicians connected with this 
department. 

Throughout this year recitations, operative work and clinical 
work will total the remaining half of the final grade. 

There are over 2000 obstetric cases annually available for teach- 
ing purposes and the student is afforded opportunities for instruction 
in this most important branch of medical science which are equalled 
by very few other schools in this country. 

There are ample accommodations in both hospitals for public and 

private patients. 

77 



DEPARTMENT OF DISEASES OF WOMEN. 

Thos. A. Ashby, M.D., LL.D Professor of Diseases of Women 

W. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Demonstrator of Gynecology 

W. K. White, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

S. H. Streett, S.B., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

J. M. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

L. H. Douglas, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Lectures, one hour each week throughout the 
course, thirty-two hours. Professor Ashby. 

The class is divided into sections for recitations and conferences 
one hour each week. Drs. Brent, Hayward, Willse, Mitchell, Streett, 
and Fenton. 

The class is divided into sections and receives instructions one hour 
weekly in diagnosis and gynaecological operations at the University 
Hospital. Professor Hundley. 

Sections in diagnosis and gynaecological operations two hours 
each week in the City Hospitals at Bay View. Dr. Brent. 

Sections in diagnosis and gynaecological operations one hour each 
week at the Maryland General Hospital. Professor Perry. 

Fourth Year. Operative Gynaecology two hours each week 
to the entire class. Professors Ashby, Perry and Hundley. 

Dispensary Instruction. The class is divided into small groups and 
receives instruction daily in the out patient departments of the Uni- 
versity and Maryland General Hospitals. 



78 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE. 



Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D. 
Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M D. 
H. C. Knapp, M.D. 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 
Ed-ware N. Brush, M.D. 
T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D. 



C. E. Simon, M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 

W. T. Watson, M.D. 

L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 



C. W. W. Judd, M.D. 

COURSES. 

Recitations in General Medicine: Two hours weekly to Third year 
class. Drs. McCleary, Beck, Judd and Knapp. 

Lecture and Recitation, Medical Therapeutics: Weekly to Third year 
class. Dr. Watson. 

Physical and Medical Diagnosis: Practical instruction to small 
sections Third year class, two hours daily for ten w r eeks. Drs. 
Rosenthal and Judd. 

General Medicine and Medical Diagnosis: To section of Third 
year class, two hours three times a week for ten weeks. Drs. Lock- 
wood, Gamble and Mayer. 

Recitations in General Medicine: Two hours weekly to Fourth 
year class. Drs. Lockwood and Gamble. 

Clinical Lecture on General Medicine: One hour weekly for Fourth 
year class. Dr. Lockwood. 

Clinical Lecture on Special Diseases: One hour weekly to Fourth 
year class — (heart, kidneys, liver, etc.). Drs. Gamble and 
Rosenthal. 

Clinical and Pathological Conferences: One hour weekly to Fourth 
year class. Drs. Lockwood and Stokes. 

Ward Work: Eleven hours weekly for ten weeks. Sections of 
Fourth year class. Drs. McCleary, Beck, Judd and Knapp. 

Section Work: In the Third year tw r o hours daily in small sections 
in the Medical Dispensary, ten weeks. Drs. Rosenthal, and Judd. 



79 



In the Fourth year members of Medical Section are assigned to 
cases in wards. They write histories, make physical and labora- 
tory examination. 

Clinical Pathology. (Including Laboratory Diagnosis, Blood, 
Urine, Sputum, etc.) Six hours weekly for ten weeks to sections of 
Third year class. Drs. Simon, White, Judd and Lewis. 

Clinical Pathology. (Including advanced Laboratory Work, 
Blood Cultures, Wasserman reaction, etc.) Four hours weekly to 
section of the Fourth year class. Drs. Simon, White, Judd and 
Lewis. 

Experimental Medicine: One hour weekly, ten weeks to Fourth 
year class. Dr. Simon. 

Pediatrics: Lecture-recitation one hour weekly to Third year 
class. Dr. Ruhrah. 

Pediatrics: Recitation-clinic two hours weekly for ten weeks to 
sections of Fourth year class. Dr. E. B. Friedenwald. 

Gastro-Enterology : Recitation-clinic one hour weekly to Third 
year class. Dr. J. Friedenwald. 

Gastro-Enterology : Clinics two hours weekly for ten weeks to sec- 
tions of Fourth year class. Drs. J. Friedenwald and Leitz. 

Psychiatry: One hour weekly after January 1st. Dr. Brush. 

Neurology and Psychiatry: Lecture-recitation one hour weekly to 
Third year class. Dr. Gillis. 

Neurology and Psychiatry: Clinic-recitation two hours weekly 
for ten weeks to sections of the Fourth year class. Drs. Gillis and 
Sargent. 

Psychiatry: Clinics at Sheppard-Pratt Hospital and Bay View. 
Two hours weekly, October to January. Drs. Brush, Gillis and 
Sargent. 

Hygiene and Public Health: Weekly to Third year class. Dr. 
Jones. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

J. W. Chambers, M.D. A. C. Harrison, M.D. 

C. F. Blake M D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D. Thomas R. Chalmers, M.D. 

Harvey B. Stone, M.D. E. H. Hutchins, M.D. 

A. G. Rytina, M.D. R. W. Locher, M.D. 
Wm. W. Requardt, M.D. 



80 



Third Year 

Systematic courses, including lectures and recitations, will be 
given as follows: 

1. Operative surgery. A laboratory course in which actual 
operative procedures and techniques are demonstrated. 90 hours. 

2. Traumatic and minor surgery. Including fractures, dislocations, 
burns, etc. 30 hours. 

3. Technique. Including operative technique, preparation and 
care of patients, surgical infections, inflammations, ulcer, gangrene, 
etc. 30 hours. 

4. Dispensary work in sections. 20 hours. 

5. Surgical clinics. 90 hours. 

Fourth Year 

1. A systematic course of lectures and recitations on general and 
special surgical subjects. 60 hours. 

2. Surgical pathology. Laboratory. 60 hours. Lectures and 
demonstrations. 30 hours. 

3. Surgical clinics in which practical asepsis and operative tech- 
nique are exemplified. 120 hours. 

4. Ward work in which students are assigned to cases, examinations 
and diagnoses are made, histories written, and the course of the 
disease observed. 40 hours. 

5. Ward instruction and quizzing. 50 hours. 

6. Rectal surgery. Lectures and clinics. 30 hours. 

7. Genito-urinary surgery. Lectures and clinics. 30 hours. 

8. Orthopedic surgery. Lectures and clinics. 30 hours. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D. 

Jos. I. Kemler, M.D. 

Practical Course in the Use of Ophthalmoscope: And methods of 
examination of eye and ear. Once weekly for ten weeks to sections 
of Third year class. Dr. Fleckenstein. 

Systematic and Clinical Course: In disease of the eye and ear. 
Twice weekly to entire class throughout the Fourth year. This 
course is taken up with view to meet the needs of the general practi- 
tioner. Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

Clinical Course: To small sections. Each section meeting twice 
weekly for ten weeks in Dispensary. Dr. Kemler. 

81 






RHINOLOGY AND LARYNGOLOGY. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Systematic Course: To Third year class. Once weekly from Janu- 
ary first to end of session. Dr. Sanger. 

Clinical and Operative Course: To sections of the Fourth year 
class. Once weekly for ten weeks. Dr. Sanger. 

Clinical and Operative Course: To small sections of the Fourth 
year class in the dispensary. Twice weekly for ten weeks.. Dr. 
Mitchell. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

Dr. Melvin Rosenthal. 

Systematic Course: Including clinical demonstrations Once weekly 
throughout the Fourth year. Dr. Melvin Rosenthal. 

Clinical Course: Small sections of Fourth year class meet in Dis- 
pensary. Dr. Melvin Rosenthal. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D. Emil Novak, M.D. 

Chas. E. Brack, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Maurice Lazenbt, M.D. Byron W. Steele M.D. 

Courses. 

Obstetric Anatomy and Physiology: Lectures and demonstrations 
twice weekly, October to January. Third year. Dr. Dobbin. 

Physiologic Obstetrics: Lectures and demonstrations twice weekly. 
January to May. Third year. Dr. Dobbin. 

Physiologic Obstetrics: Recitation. One hour weekly. October to 
June. Third year. Dr. Lazenby. 

Practical Obstetrics (Manikin work) : Section demonstration four 
hours weekly. Third year. Drs. Litsinger and Steele. 

Pathological Obstetrics: Lectures and demonstrations one hour 
weekly Fourth year, February to June. Dr. Dobbin. October 
to February. Dr. Brack. 

Obstetric Clinic: One hour weekly, October to June (as material 
is available). Fourth year. Dr. Dobbin. 

Obstetric Diagnosis: Practical clinical work and quizzes in obstetric 
ward, two hours weekly in sections. Fourth year. Dr. Brack. 

Attendance Upon Cases in Labor: Attendance by members of 
class in hospital and out-door department (about 500 cases per year) 
as cases occur. Fourth year. Dr. Steele. 

82 



DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 
A. Samuels, M.D. Geo. A. Strauss, M.D. 

Courses 

Recitation: One hour weekly, Third year. Dr. Gardner. 

Laboratory: Special Pathology, with study of clinical histories, 
four hours weekly for ten weeks, in sections, Third year. Drs. 
Gardner and Strauss. 

Recitation: One hour weekly. Fourth year. Dr. Gardner. 

Gynecological Clinic: Six hours weekly for ten weeks. Fourth 
year. Drs. Gardner, Samuels and Strauss. 

THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

Mary E. Sullivan, R.N., M.U.H. 1911. 

Superintendent of Training School. 

Julia C. Foley, R.N., M.U.H. 1914. 

Assistant Superintendent. 

The University of Maryland Hospital Training School for Nurses 
offers a three years' course of training. 

Those wishing to obtain the course of instruction must apply per- 
sonally or by letter to the Superintendent of Nurses, who will fur- 
nish printed instructions respecting the personal information to be 
given by applicants. Letters of application should be accompanied 
by a statement from a clergyman testifying to good moral character 
and from a physician certifying to sound health and unimpaired fac- 
ulties. Applicants must be between twenty-one and thirty-five 
years of age, of at least average height and physique, and must give 
satisfactory evidence of fitness in disposition and temperament for 
the work of nursing. 

If approved, applicants are received into the school for a period 
of six months on probation during which time demonstration classes 
are held and they are given instruction in the elementary part of the 
training. 

Classes are formed and pupils are received in the spring and autumn. 

High school graduates and women of higher education are given 
the preference. Their superior preparation makes them better 
fitted for the opportunities that are opening up in the profession of 
nursing. Graduates of this school are eligible for Red Cross and 
all Government work. 

83 



The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness of proba- 
tioners for the work and the propriety of retaining or dismissing 
them and she may at any time determine the connection of a pupil 
with the school in case of misconduct, inefficiency or neglect of duty. 

Except under special circumstances failure to pass the examina- 
tions at the end of the first year is considered a sufficient cause for 
the termination of a student's connection with the school. 

Students reside in the home and serve as assistants in the various 
departments of the Hospital for the full three years. They are ex- 
pected to perform any duty assigned to them by the Superintendent 
of Nurses. 

After the months of probation, students are required when on 
duty, to wear the dress prescribed by the Hospital which is blue and 
white striped gingham, with white apron and cap and linen collar and 
cuffs. Probationers are not allowed to wear this dress. 

Day Nurses are on duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m with one hour 
for dinner and three hours for rest and recreation. They are given 
an afternoon each week and part of every Sunday. Each student is 
required to devote at least one hour daily to lecture, class work or 
study. A vacation of three weeks is allowed each year. 

In sickness all students are cared for gratuitously, but the time so 
lost must be made up. 

The course of training includes practical instruction in the nursing 
of medical, surgical, orthopedic, gynaecological patients, obstetrics, 
the nursing of children and the operating room work. 

A course of lectures is given by the physicians and surgeons of the 
University and class instruction with demonstrations by the Super- 
intendent of Nurses and her assistants. Examinations are held at 
stated periods. 

When the full term of three years is ended, the nurses thus trained 
will be at liberty to choose their own fields of labor, whether in hos- 
pitals, in private families, or in the various branches of social work 
which offer such tremendous opportunities for the woman of abilty. 
A diploma is given upon completion of course of training. 

In addition to board, lodging and a reasonable amount of laundry 
work, each student receives an allowance of $5.00 per month to de- 
fray the expenses of uniforms, text-books, etc., incidental to her 
training. 



84 



Graduates 1915 

Florence Matilda Skinner Maryland 

Betty Eliza White Maryland 

Florence Viola Meredith Maryland 

Lelia Irene Shields North Carolina 

Norma Irene Frothingham Maryland 

Nettie Madel Bay Maryland 

Emily Ruth Conner Maryland 

Alfretta Myers Maryland 

Mabel Ione Lea North Carolina 

Ruth Cundiff Stoneham Virginia 

Elizabeth Blanche Beazley Virginia 

Elizabeth Nordt Maryland 

Elva May Boor Pennsylvania 

Lillian Kemp McDaniel Maryland 

Bertie Susan Pinckard Virginia 

Martha Etta Coppersmith Maryland 

Gertrude May Dilly West Virginia 

Corinne Loraine Bogart West Virginia 



THE MERCY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

The Mercy Hospital Training School for Nurses, conducted by the 
Sisters of Mercy and connected with the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, w r as organized and incorporated under the general laws 
of the State of Maryland in 1899. Its first students were graduated 
in 1901; and on the passage of the bill for registration in 1904, the 
Sisters of Mercy, connected with the Hospital service, received 
certificates as registered nurses. 

The Training School w r as affiliated with the Board of Regents of 
the State of New York in 1906; and, in the same year, the Alumnae 
Association w r as incorporated, having been previously connected 
with the Associated Alumnae of the United States. The graduates, 
as active members, have been much interested in the movements 
of the Maryland Association of Graduate Nurses, to whom they have 
given every encouragement to uplift the profession in its many 
works of district nursing, tuberculosis campaign, Red Cross move- 
ments, etc. 

The course of training comprises three years of theory and practice. 
The clinical advantages are exceptional. The medical, surgical, 
orthopedic, gynecological, obstetrical, children's and dietetic de- 
partments give valuable practical experience. The nurses are 
taught the theory of nursing by class recitations and demonstrations 
by efficient Sister instructors. Supplementing this training is a 
course of lectures from the ablest professors of the College of Physi- 

85 






cians and Surgeons, who are untiring in their efforts to keep the 
School abreast with modern scientific developments. 

The requirements for entrance are; highest moral standing, 
intelligence, good education and health. The age limit is twenty 
to thirty-five years. 

After a three months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessar}^ qualifications, are admitted to the Training School proper, 
receiving five dollars a month wherewith to secure uniforms, text 
books, etc., the education they receive being considered their com- 
pensation. The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause 
which may be deemed sufficient by the Sister Superior or Superin- 
tendent. 

The Training School, now far advanced in its second decade, can 
look back with complacency on the work achieved by its graduates; 
and encouraged by that glance and gladdened by the prospect of 
future good to be accomplished, it hopes to keep its way upward and 
onward, ever striving in its mission of mercy for the Master's smile 
of approval and His whispered word "Well Done." 

Graduates of 1915 

Elizabeth Ann McCoxyille Ohio 

Mary Florence Connelly Maryland 

Lillian J. Gel wicks Maryland 

Eugenia Lee Hall Maryland 

Agnes Katherine Burns Ireland 

Anna Maria Hall Maryland 

Carrie Estelle Beck Pennsylvania 

Winifred Moore West Virginia 

Elizabeth Ann Riggleman West Virginia 

Ada Carter Trainer Pennsylvania 

Frances Louise Jennings Maryland 

Florence Marie Doyle Maryland 

Nell Annita Kalb augh Maryland 

Edith Agnes Lambie Maryland 

Julia Eleanor Ryan West Virginia 

Clara Elizabeth Connery Maryland 

Mattie Dew Georgia 

Lucy Murtha Pennsylvania 

Agnes McCloskey New York, 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the Board of 
Trustees of this Fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 
Harry Adler, M.D. B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Thomas A. Ashby, M.D. Henry P. Hynson, Phar. D. 

Charles Markell, LL.B. 

86 



This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being ''The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuating, 
filling itself any vacancies. Its powers are limited to the expenditure 
of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied in the dis- 
cretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. Contributions, 
donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni and friends. They 
may be made to the general or University Fund, to the Medical 
Fund or to any other department of the University. If intended 
for the School of Medicine, they may be given to the general medical 
fund or to some special object, as building, research, library, pathology, 
hospital, publication, laboratories, gymnasium, scholarship, medal, 
prize, etc., in which case the wishes of the donor will be strictly 
regarded. Attention is invited to the " Charles Frick Research 
Fund," already established in memory of that distinguished investi- 
gator. Checks should be made payable to Charles Markell, Treas- 
urer, 1137 Calvert Building, Baltimore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State 
of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 

The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 

The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an 
orator will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old 
classmates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates 
who have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 



s7 



President — Dr. Albert Hynson Carroll 

Vice President — Dr. Wigand, Dr. Carroll Lockard, Dr. Clement Clark 

Corresponding Secretary — Dr. Pennington 

Recording Secretary — Dr. H. O. Reik 

Treasurer — Dr. John Houff 

Executive Committee 

Dr. G. Lane Taneyhill, Dr. B. Merrill Hopkinson, Dr. C. R. Winterson 
Dr. A. D. Machoniche. Dr. Irving Spear 

Necrology, Dr. Joseph T. Smith 

Central Membership Committee 

Drs. Albert H. Carroll (Chairman), G. Lane Taneyhill, Guy Steel, 
John Houff, I. Stone Worthington, Marshall West, J. C. Travers 

Application for membership should be accompanied with Initiation Fee of 
$1.00 and mailed to the Corresponding Secretary or Treasurer. 

GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

Eugene W. Hodson, President, Care of Thomas & Thompson Co. 

E.J. W. Revell, Vice-President, 919 Fidelity Bldg. 

Wm. K. Stichel, Treasurer, Care of Thomas & Thompson Co. 

Dr. Albert H. Carroll, Recording Secretary, Walpert Apartments. 

Edward P. Crummer, Corresponding Secretary, 217 St. Paul Street. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION, COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

President 
Samuel H. Allen, M.D. 

First Vice-President 

W. E. McGinley, M.D. 

Second Vice-President 

W. C. Stifler, M.D. 

Secretary 

Harvey K. Fleckenstein, M.D. 

Treasurer 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

Executive Committee 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, M.D. H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D. 



88 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

C. S. Peeler, President. 

This Association since its establishment, eighteen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

The Association now occupies comfortable rooms in one of the buildings of 
the University. 

Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout 
the College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character 
and morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session to wel- 
come new students to the University, and will also be glad to render assistance in 
the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding houses, etc., and to extend any 
other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges of the Association, and to address the officer named 
below, who will be glad to furnish any information desired regarding the Asso- 
ciation and its work, and to render any assistance in his power, and upon ar- 
riving in the city are requested to make themselves known as soon as possible. 

C. S. Peeler, President. 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, Md. 



89 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 

FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

John Brockawat Ripperb, A.M. (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Vice-President, Professor of 

Latin. 
John B. White, A.M. (Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 
Benjamin Harrison Waddell, A.M. (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor of 

Mathematics. 
Adolf Schumacher, Ph.D. (Graduate of Gottlngen and University of Pennsylvania), Professor of 

French and German. 
Reginald H. Ridqelt, B.S., A.M. (Graduate of St. John's College). Professor of Biology. 
John Clifford Gray, A.B., A.M. (Graduate of Harvard University), Professor of Chemistry and 

Physics. 
Chauncet St. C. McNeill. U.S.A. (Lieutenant of the United States Army), Professor of Military 

Science and Tactics and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 
StanwoodCobb, A.B., A.M., (Graduate of Dartmouth College and ot Harvard University), Pro- 
fessor of English. 
Henry Francis Sturdy, A.B., A.M., (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of History and 

Political Economy. 
Harvey C. Mittendorf, A.M., (Graduate U. S. Naval Academy), Professor of Mechanical Drawing 

and Assistant Professor of Physics. 
Thomas L. Gladden, Superintendent of the Preparatory School and Instructor In English and 

Latin. 
RoscoE E. Grove, A.B. (Graduate of St. John's College). 
Sarah Berry, Registrar and Secretary for the President. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

The Regular Winter Season begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the following 
May. 
The requirements for admission are the Fame as In aU other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics. 

Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 

J. William Smith, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

Elmer E. Cruzen, D.D.S., Professor of Crown and Bridge Work and Ceramics. 

B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 

Eldridge Baskin, M.D., D.D.S., Associate Professor of Clinical Dentistry and Orthodontia. 

J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whitino Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 

Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Instructor of Histology and Dental Anatomy. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Robert L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 

E. Frank Kelly, Ph.G., Di/ector of Chemical Laboratory. 

Francis J. Valentine, A.M., D.D.S., Director of Dental Infirmary. 

For information and annual catalogue address T. 0. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Dean Balti- 
more, Md. 

90 



* i 



DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL SESSION. 
THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Dean. 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., Esq., Testamentary Law. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., Banking Law. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Esq., Common Carriers. 

Howard Bryant, Esq.. Practice in State Courts. 

W. Calvin Chestnut, Esq., Insurance. 

Ward B. Coe, Esq., Title and Conveyancing. 

William C. Coleman, Esq., Bills and Notes. 

James U. Dennis, Esq., Personal Property, Including Bailments. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., Contracts and Agency. 

Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Torts. 

Hon. James P. Gorter, Evidence and Pleading. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Domestic Relations. 

Charles McH. Howard, Esq., Equity Jurisprudence. 

Arthur L. Jackson, Esq., Conflict of Laws and International Law. 

Stuart S. Janney, Esq., Commercial Law. 

Sylvan H. Lauchheimer. Esq., Bankruptcy. 

Hon. Alfred S. Niles, Constitutional Law. 

Eugene O'Dunne, Esq., Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence. 

William Lee Rawls, Esq., Corporations. 

Albert C. Richie. Esq., Elementary Law. 

Hon. John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Shipping 

Patents, Trade-Marks and Copyrights. 
G. Ridgley Sappington, Esq., Practice Court. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq.. Real Property. 
Clarence A. Tucker, Esq., Equity Procedure. 
Joseph N. Ullman, Esq., Sales of Personal Property. 

For catalogue containing full information, address, EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary and 
Treasurer of Law Faculty, 301 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 1841-1904. 

THE SEVENTY-SECOND ANNUAL SESSION. 

FACULTY. 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M. R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles C. Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Materia Medlca, Botany and Vegetable Histology 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

Louis J. Burger, Ph.G., LL.B., Lecturer on Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 

George A. Stall, Phar.D., Demonstrator in Dispensing. 



91 



INDEX. 

Alumni Associations: 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 88 

University of Maryland 88 

University of Maryland Medical Department 87 

Annual Appointments 51 

Board of Instruction G 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 37 

Consolidation of Schools 39 

Curriculum 59 

First and Second Years 60 

College of Physicians and Surgeons, Third and Fourth Years 79 

University of Maryland School of Medicine, Third and Fourth Years 66 
Dispensaries : 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 47 

Maryland General Hospital 46 

University Hospital 46 

Expenses, Students' 58 

Faculty of Physic 5 

Fees 56 

Graduates: 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 35 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 32 

Hospitals: 

City Hospitals 43 

James Lawrence Kern an Hospital 44 

Maryland General Hospital 41 

Maryland Lying-in Asylum, The 43 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, The 42 

Maternity Hospital of the University of Maryland 42 

Mercy Hospital 40 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane 44 

Presbyterian Ear, Eye and Throat Charity Hospital, The 43 

Rosewood State Training School 44 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for the Insane, The 45 

South Baltimore Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Charity Hospital 44 

Springfield State Hospital 45 

Spring Grove State Hospital 45 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 44 

University Hospital 39 



Laboratories: 

Anatomical 47 

Chemical 48 

Clinical Pathology 49 

Histology and Embryology 48 

Pathology and Bacteriology 49 

Physiology 48 

Physiological Chemistry 48 

Libraries 49 

Matriculates: 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 33 

University of Maryland School of Medicine 25 

Museum 50 

Pasteur Institute of Baltimore 45 

Prizes 52 

Publications 50 

Resident Students 47 

Requirements for Matriculation 52 

Rules 55 

Scholarships 57 

Staffs: 

City Hospitals at Bay view 19 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 18 

Maryland General Hospital 16 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, The 21 

Maternite Hospital 21 

Mercy Hospital 13 

Nursery and Child's Hospital 20 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 21 

University Hospital 11 

Training School for Nurses: 

Mercy Hospital 85 

University Hospital 83 

University of Maryland : 

School of Medicine 36 

Department of Arts and Sciences 90 

Department of Dentistry 90 

Department of Law 91 

Department of Pharmacy 91 

Young Men's Christian Association 89 



94 




MERCY HOSPITAL 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 



VOL.1 



JULY, 1916 



NO. 2 



BULLETIN 



OF 



University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 



and 



College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1916-1917 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY EXCEPT 

AUGUST AND SEPTEMBER 

CALVERT AND SARATOGA STREETS 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as Becond-class matter June 18, 1916 at the Post Office at Baltimore, Md. 
under the Act of August 24, 1912 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin, of the University of Maryland, 
Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Vol. I JULY, 1916 No. 2 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

SESSION 1916-1917 



CALENDAR. 



1916-17 



June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University, Mercy, and 
Maryland General Hospitals. 

September 25. — Examination of Conditioned Students and Exami- 
nation for Advanced Standing. 

October 2. — Regular Session begins. 

November 29. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

December 4. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

December 22. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

January 3. — Christmas Recess ends. 9 

April 5. — Easter Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

Apri' 10. — Easter Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

June 4. — Commencement. 



a.m. 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments 

having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The College of Liberal Arts at Annapoli 

John's College, Annapolis, Aid,, founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Aid. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland was established in Baltimore in 1807; The College 
of Physicians and Surgeons was established in Baltimore in 1872. 
The consolidated school offers a high grade course in medicine ex- 
tending over a period of four years, and leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Aid. Thisschool, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by of a coin 

study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the i . 

4th. The School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Aid., was founded 
in 1882, and is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral 
part of the School of Medicine. The course of study leading 1 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

oth. The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore, Md., was es 
lished in 1841 as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated 
with the School of Medicine in 1904. The course of study < 
two years, and leads to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 

3 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., I. H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S. 

LL.D. Robert Moss, Esq. 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D. William L. Rawls, Esq. 

John C. Rose, LL.B., LL.D. Randolph Barton. Jr., A.B., LL.B. 

D. M. R. Culbreth, A.M*., M.D. Alfred S. Niles, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., John W. Chambers, M.D., Sc.D. 

LL.D. William F. Lockwood, M.D. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D. George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D. Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

Philemon H. Tuck, A.M., LL.B. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 
T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree, 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 
HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, 
Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., 

President of St. John's College. 

J. B. RIPPERE, A.M., 

PHILEMON H. TUCK, A.M., LL.D., 

For St. John's College. 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M.D., 

For School of Medicine. 

HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D., 

For School of Law. 
T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S,, 

For School of Dentistry. 

CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D, 

For School of Pharmacy. 

4 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

FOUNDED 1807. 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

FOUNDED 1872. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

RAND )^PH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

L. E. T ^ALE, M.D., LL.D. 

CHARLES W. MITCHELL, A.M., M.D. 

J. HOLMES SMITH, M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY', M.D. 

SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 

RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

JOHN AY. CHAMBERS, M.D., Sc.D. 

WILLIAM F. LOCKWOOD, M.D. 

GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M.D., Sc.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON, M.D. 

CARY B. GAMBLE, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

HIRAM WOODS, A.M., M.D. 

CHARLES E. SIMON, A.B., M.D. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Clinical 

Medicine. 
J. Holmes Smith, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and 

Clinical Medicine. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William Simon, Ph.D., M.D., Sc.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 
John W. Chambers, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Nathaniel G. Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Medical 

Jurisprudence. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 
William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteri- 
ology. 
Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
Gary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 
Julius Friedenwald, A M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 
T. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 
Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry and 

Clinical Pathology. 
Earnest Zueblin, M.D., Professor of Experimental and Clinical Medicine. 
Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 
Harry - Adler, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 
Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 
Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 
A. C. Pole, M.D., Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 
J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgerj'. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor of Clinical Opthalmology and Otology. 
Charles O'Donovax, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

and Pediatrics. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 

Colon. 

6 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 7 

W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Professor of Hygiene. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

Jas. A. Nydegger, A.M.. M.D., Sc.D.. Surg. U. S. P. H. Service, Professor of 
Tropical Medicine. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.B., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene and 
Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Clinical 
Pediatrics. 

Samuel J. Fort, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., D.Sc. Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery and Surgical 
Pathology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychia- 
try. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Pearce Kintzing, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albert T. Chambers, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Sydney- M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

-VV. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy and Clinical 
Surgery. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.I)., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 



8 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

H. R. Spencer. M.O., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

J. Clement Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Wm. I. Messick, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Holliday H. Hayden, M.D., Associate Professor of Applied Anatomy. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 
and Dermatology. 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Abraham Samuels, Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

William W. Requardt, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Caleb W. G. Rohrer, A.M., M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Glenn M. Litsinger, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

George W. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and 
Nose. 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Physiological Chem- 
istry and Clinical Pathology. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

J. R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Wm. Greenfeld, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Patholo- 
gist to University Hospital. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology and Physiologi- 
cal Chemistry. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Dis- 
eases. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Harvey B. Stone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 



BOARD OF Instruction ( 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Anaesthesia. 

Wm. JI. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. E. Peterman, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate in Anatomy and Histology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

G. W. He.mmeter, M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D., Associate in Materia Medica. 

H. W. Stoner, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Geo. A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

W. Milton Lewis, M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 

Joseph 1. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

F. K. Nichols, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M.D., Associate in Bacteriology. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 
George Murgatroyd, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Frank J. Kirby, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

Fred. Rankin, A.M., M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

H. J. Walton, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Wm. C. Stifler, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Wm. Caspari, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. Wesley Cole, M.D., Associate in Medicine. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Associate in Otology. 

J. McF. Berglaxd, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

B. M. Bernheim, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Blood-Vessel Surgery. 

Frank W. Keating, M.D., Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics. 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D., Lecturer on Psychiatry. 

G. A. Fleming, M.D., Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

J. T. O'Mara, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Demonstrator of Dermatology. 

S. H. Street, B.S., M.D., Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Demonstrator of Orthopedic Surgery. 



10 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

B. S. Han.sa, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 
J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

VV. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

Milton P. Hill, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

Christian Deetjen, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Ernest G. Marr, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Howard D. Lewis, M.D.-; Instructor in Surgery. 

Sam'l. W. Moore, D.D.S., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry 
John Evans, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. V. Culverhouse, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

C. YV. Rauschenbach, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
Wm . R. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

E. E. Mayer, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 
J. M. Fenton, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 
J. E. Brumback, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
J. D. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 
John S. Fenby, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

C Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

J. G. Stiefel, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

R. D. West, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Le Compte Cook, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
L. M. C. Parker, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Frank J. Powers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
O. V. Linhard, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

F. E. Shipley, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 
Charles B. Wheltle, M.D., Assistant in Medicino- 
J. W. V. Clift, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Wm. B. Schapiro, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 
Wm. A. Boyd, B.S., M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 11 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Attending Surgeons. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M.. M.D.. LL.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. J. W. Holland, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Wariteld, M.D. R. P. Bay, M.I). 

Attending Physicians. 

Charles W. Mitchell. A.M.. M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

John C. Hemmeter, Ph.D., M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Charles O'Donoyan. A.M., M.D. 

Attending Gynecologists. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. W. P. Perry, M.D. 

Attending Obstetricians. 
L. E. Xeale, M.D., LL.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. J. Frank Crouch, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Samuel K. Merrick, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Attending Orthopedic Surgeons. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Genito-U rinary Surgeons. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologists. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McClearv, M.D. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Roentgenologist. 
H. J. Walton, M.D. 



12 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

RESIDENT STAFF 
William J. Coleman, Medical Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons. 

W. H. Toulson, M.S., AI.D. C. P. Ross, AI.D. 

C. C. Hoke, A.M., M.D. M. J. Egan, M.D. 

J. C. Brogden, A.B., M.D.. C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

Resident Physicians. 

H. M. Stein, M.D. B. J. Ferry, M.D. 

F. C. Marino, M.D. R. H. Folk, A.B., M.D. 

J. E. Evans, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 
C. S. Long, M.D. 

Maternity Department. 

J. J. Waff, Chief Resident Obstetrician. 
W. T. Ferneyhough, M.D. T. L. Bray, M.D. 

Pathologist. 
J. T. Lutz, A.B., M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 
SURGICAL DIVISION. 

Surgeons. 

John W. Chambers, M.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Harvey B. Stone, M.D. William W. Reouardt, M.D. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Alfred Ulman, M.D. Thos. R. Chambers, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 13 

Rhinologist and Laryngology si . 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologist and Lanjngologist. 
George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Urologist. 
A. G. Rytina, M.D. 



MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

.4 ssoc iate Physicians . 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D. Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. Louis J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 

Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

.4 ssociate Gastro-Enterologist. 
T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D. 

Pediatrists. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



14 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetrician. 
George W. Dobbin, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Emil Novak, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Gynecologist. 
William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists. 
Abraham Samuels, M.D. George Strauss, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologist. 
William Royal Stokes, M.D. 

Associate Pathologist. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Clinical Pathologist. 
Charles E. Simon, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF OTO-NEUROLOGY. 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 15 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographer. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Assistant Radiographer. 
Humphrey D. Wolfe, M.D. 



HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. William F. Lockwood, M.D. 

Chairman. William S. Gardner, M.D. 
John W. Chambers, M.D. Secretary. 

Charles F. Blake, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons. 

Richard Shea, M.D. Ignatius P. A. Byrne, M.D. 

Raymond W. McKenzie, M.D. Guy R. Post, M.D. 

Harry L. Rogers, M.D. Edward Syrop, M.D. 

David M. Airman, M.D. Humphrey D. Wolfe, M.D. 

Resident Physicians. 

Erwin E. Mayer, M.D. 
T. H. Morrison, M.D. George McLean, M.D. 

Bartus T. Baggott, M.D. Arthur F. Peterson, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 
Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Lucien R. Chaput, M.D. 

Accident Service. 
H. H. Johnson, M.D. Lewis H. Howard, M.D. 



In MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF. 

VISITING STAFF. 

John D. Blake, M.D. Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.I) 

Rid(jely B. Warfield. M.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. 

Associates. 

.}. C. Lumpkin, M.D. _ A. G. Barrett, M.D. 

H. C. Blake, M.D Nathan Winslow, A.M., M D 

.J. B. CULVEKHOUSE, M.D. 

Physicians. 

E. B. Freeman, M.D Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

A. C. Pole, M.D Jno. C. He.mmeter, M.D.. Ph.D., Sc.D.. LL I) 

J. W. Cole, M.D. Harry Adler, A.B. M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. E. Podlton, M.D. L. M. G. Parker, M.D. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B.. M.D. Chas. B. Wheltle, M.D 

Frank J. Powers, M.D. .1. W. Clift, M.D. 

0. V. LlNHARDT, M.D 

Xeurologists. 
Chas. G. Hill. A.M., M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. Clement Clark, M.D J. Percy Wade, M.D 

W. P. E. Wyse, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 
S. K. Merrick, M.D. .John R. Winslow, A.B,.. M.D 

Obstetricians. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Xeale, M.D., LL.D 

Associates . 

J. K. B. Seegar. M.D. Stanley H. Gorsuch, M.D 

H. N. Freeman. M.D 

Gynecologists. 
IV. B. Perry. M.D J. Mason Hundley, M.D 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 1 i 

Associates. 

S. H. Stkeett, B.S., M.D. Mac kick Lazbnby, MI). 

J. M. Fenton, M.D. ]•:. H. Hayward, Mi) 

Ophthalmologists . 
.}. Frank Crouch, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

Associates. 

Clyde A. Clapp. M.D. It. D. West, M.D. 

II. E. Peterman, M.D. 

Proctologists. 
(I. Milton Linthicum, A.M., Ml) 

A ssociate. 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 

Radiologist. 
John Evans, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Stroebel, A.B., M.D 

Urologist. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sidney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologists. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McClearv, M.D. 

H. W. Stoner, M.D. H. B. Wylie, M.D. 

Anaesthetist. 

J. B. Culverhouse, M.D. 
Elmer Newcomer, M.D., Medical Superintendent 



RESIDENT STAFF. 



G. A. Bavvden, M.D. \Y. II. Sloan, M.D. 

B. H. Lovely, M.D. B. M. Jaffe, M.D. 

G. R. Patrick, M.D H. Goldman, M.D 

D. C Hutton. M.D B. H. Growt. M.D 

I I*. Nicholson. M.D. 



18 KERNAN HOSPITAL STAFF 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Ttjnstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

COMPTON RlELY, M.D. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Dispensary Surgeon and Anaesthetist. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant Surgeon and Superintendent. 

Louis A. Buie, A.B., M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Caroline H. Barney, R.N., Head Nurse. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman, Instructor in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Ada Mosby, Kindergartner and Industrial Teacher. 

Roentgenologist. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Attending Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atkinson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Richard H. Johnston, M.D. 

Attending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake, M.D. 



BAYVIEW HOSPITAL STAFF 19 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentist. 
G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

L. McLane Tiffany, A.B., M.D. W. S. Halsted, A.B., LL.D., B.Sc, M.D. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D.. 

William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 
John N. MacKenzie, A.B., M.D. 



STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITAL AT BAYVIEW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

Milton C. Winternitz, A.B., M.D., Pathologist. 

R. G. Hussey, A.B., M.D., Assistant Pathologist. 



CONSULTING STAFF. 

Ophthalmologist. 
James J. Mills, M.D. 



20 NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL STAFK 

Laryngologist. 

Kkank Dyer Sangkr, M.D. 

Otologist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 



ST. ELIZABETH HOME. 

Attending Physician. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Surgeon. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
A. C. Gillis, M.D. 



STAFF OF NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL. 

Attending Physicians. 

Chas. F. Bevan, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D 

John Ruhrah, IVl.D. 

Resident Physician. 
Frances Hertzog, M.D. 

Consulting Phi/sir inns. 

John VV. Chambers, M.D. Wm. S. Baer, M.D. 

Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D. Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Oculist and Aurist. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Superintendent. 
Miss Elizabeth M. Stone. 






MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL STAFK 21 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 
Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O'Donovan A.M.. M.D. Eugene II. Hayward, M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

.1. F. Powers, M.D. Charles B. Wheltle, M.D. 

I ' is i ting Surgeo ns . 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

II. B. Warpield, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.I) 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde E. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M.. M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Proctologist. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Pathologists. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
Cornelius L. Donahue. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL (MATERNITE) 

Visiting Obstetricians. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. Glenn M. Litsingek, M.D. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Lucien A. Chaput, M.D. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN HO: r-ITAL. 
Obstetricians. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Neale, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, Ml) 

H. N. Freeman. M I). 

Resident Obstetrician. 
( Iko. It. Patrick, Ml). 



22 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 
John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Chief of Out-Patient Department. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., 
Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Medicine. 

S. R. Clarke, M.D., R. C. Metzel, M.D., H. U. Todd, M.D., W. G. Clop- 
ton, M.D., Eugene Kerr, M.D., M. S. Schimmel, M.D., Le Compte 
Cook, M.D., Assistants. 

R. P. Bay, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Surgery. 
Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Chief of Clinic. 

Fred. Rankin, A.M., M.D., Thos. L. Phillips, M.D., Edgar S. Perkins, 
M.D., Charles R. Edwards, M.D., H. M. Foster, M.D., Assistants. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., C. W. Rauschinbach, M.D., Robert C. Nitsch, 
A.B., M.D., Assistants. 

W. K. White, M.D., R. L. Mitchell, M.D., R. G. Willse, M.D., L. H. 
Douglas, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of Women. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Eye and Ear Diseases. 
E. A. Looper, M.D., Assistant. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D., Chiefs of 

Clinic to the Professor of Dermatology. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D., Assistant. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Stomach. 
J. Harry Ulrich, M.D., Assistant. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic to the Professor of Diseases of the Throat 

and Nose. 
H. L. Sinskey, M.D., Assistant. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. Harry Daniels, M.D., Louis A. Buie, A.B., M.D., Assistants. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-V rinary Diseases. 
A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

George M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Benjamin Puskhin, M.D., Assistants. 

G. Milton Linthicum, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 
J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Clinic. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D., L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chiefs of Clinic to the Pro- 
fessor of Obstetrics. 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPEXSARY STAFF 



23 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Physician in Charge. 
B. S. Hanna, M.D. 

Surgery. 



E. H. Hutchins, M.D. 
A. M. Evans, M.D. 



Wm. J. Todd, M.D. 

A. L. Tumbleson, M.D. 



Thos. R. Chambers. M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Anton G. Rytina, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Medicine. 



A. E. Goldsteix, M.D. 
Harris Goldman, M.D. 



Harvey G. Beck, M.D. 
B. S. Hanna, M.D. 



W. G. Coppage, M.D. 
A. A. Sienkiewicz, M.D. 



Diseases of Stomach. 



Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 
T. Fred'k Leitz, M.D. 



John G. Stiefel, M.D. 
Theodore Morrison, M.D. 



G. F. Sargent, M.D. 
Otto H. Duker, M.D. 



F. N. Hillis, M.D. 



A. Samuels, M.D. 
Emil Novak, M.D. 



G. W. Mitchell, M.D. 
W. C Stifler, M.D. 



Nervous Diseases. 
A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 
C. L. Joslin, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 



D. D. V. Stuart, Jr.,. M.D. 
W. A. Boyd, M.D. 



Frank Ayd, M.D. 

J. G. Onnen, M.D. 

C. F. J. Coughlin, M.D. 



Diseases of Nose and Throat. 
Frank Dyer Sanger. M.D. 



Diseases of Eye and Ear. 



Harry Friedenwald. M.D. 



H. J\. Fleckenstein, M.D. 



John Wade, M.D. 
W. F. Zinn. M.D. 



Jos. I. Kemler, M.D. 



24 MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

N euro-Otology. 
J. VV. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Diseases of the Rectum. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. Louis J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Diseases of Skin . 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. B. V. Kelly, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

Committee in Charge. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Chairman. 
Maurice Lazenby, M.D., Arthur G. Barrett, M.D. 

Medicine. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. L. M. C. Parker, M.D. 

J. Wesley Cole, M.D. Frank J. Powers, M.D. 

O. V. Linhardt, M.D. Charles B. Wheltle, M.D. 

J. W. V. Clift, M.D. 

Surgery. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D. J. B. Culverhouse, M.D. 

Herbert Blake, M.D. J. D. Bubert, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 
George Murgatroyd, M.D. Wm. Caspari, M.D. 

Eye and Ear. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. Reginald D. West, M.D. 

Rectal Diseases. 

Krnest Marr, M.D. 

Urology. 
J. B. Culvioichuuse, M.D. R. B. Kenyon, M.D. 

Diseases of the Stomach. 
V. E. Shipley, M.D. 

Children. 
L. M. C Parker, M.D. Chas. B. Wheltle, M.D. 

O. V. Linhardt, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 25 

Gynecology. 



Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 
Sydney Streett, A.B., M.D. 



J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 
J. K. B. E. Seegar. M.D. 



Irving J. Spear, M.D. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.I). 



Obstetrics. 



Neurology. 



J. M. Fenton, M.D. 
Eugene Hayward, M.D, 



H. S. Gorsuch, M.D. 
H. X. Freeman, M.D. 



A. C. Gillis, A.M., M.D. 
D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D. 



\Ym. A. Boyd, B.S., M.D. 

Dermatology. 
E. R. Strobel, M.D. 



Diseases of Chest. 
.J. W. Cole, M.D. 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

1915—1916. 



POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Name. Stale. 

Bobbitt, Ray Maxwell, M.D... West Virginia 

Bowes, William Joseph, A.B Maryland 

Crockett, John Henry Virginia 

D'Angelo, B. F., M.D New York 

Dembrow, William L Virginia 

Hale, Nathan G., M.D Iowa 

Harsh, E. Herbert, M.D Ohio 

Jackvony, Albert H., Phar. D... Rhode Island 

Jones, W. W., M.D Iowa 

Koch, Arthur E., A.B., M.D Ohio 

Laham, Jamil Tannus Palestine 

Lopez, Teodoro, M.D Mexico 

Lyles, William Boykin, M.D. ..South Carolina 
McElwee, Ross S., M.D North Carolina 



Name. State. 

McGuire, George Thomas, M.D. Pennsylvania 

Maresca, Robert J New Jersey 

Masley, Michael George Pennsylvania 

Michelson, Lewis, M.D California 

Morgan, Edward A., M.D West Virginia 

Naikelis, Stanley, B.S Connecticut 

Nelson, Matthew Anton, B.S Utah 

Parlade, Jaime Anjel, Phar.D Cuba 

Player, Lionel Paget, M.D California 

Speas, W. P., M.D North Carolina 

Watts, Charles N., M.D West Virginia 

Willoughby, M. Kemper, M.D New York 

Zeller, Eugene J. K., M.D Maryland 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 



Aikman, David McAllister Pennsylvania 

Anderson, Franklin B Maryland 

Arnest, Richard Turberville Virginia 

Baggott, Bartus Tre w Maryland 

Bailin, Robert New York 

Baldwin, Anton, Jr Maryland 

Bawden, George Abner Maryland 

Beck, Foster A Pennsylvania 

Bennett, Percival Robert North Carolina 

Benson, Edward H Maryland 

Bickley, William Ernest, A.B. South Carolina 

Biddle, Benjamin Harrison Ohio 

Bishop, Everett Lassiter Georgia 

Bolen, Henry L Massachusetts 

Bray, Thomas Latham North Carolina 

Brooke, Charles R Maryland 

Brown, Thomas E., Jr Pennsylvania 

Brumbaugh, Benjamin Bruce, Phar.D. 

Maryland 

Buettner, Henry Fred John Maryland 

Burton, Charles Hammon Maryland 

Byington, S. Bury District of Columbia 

Byrne, Ignatius P. A New York 

Cannon, James M West Virginia 

Carter, Paul Conway, B.S... .North Carolina 

C arrasquillo, Honorio F Porto Rico 

Cavallo, Michael Edward New York 



Chandler, James J., A.B South Carolina 

Chaput, Lucien R Massachusetts 

Childs, C. Chapin New York 

Cole, Lewis Furbeck New York 

Coltrane, John W North Carolina 

Compton, A. Fillmore West Virginia 

Crook, Charles S Maryland 

Cudd, James Erric, A.B South Carolina 

Day, Samuel Thomas, Jr New Jersey 

Dillon, William Joseph Massachusetts 

Dominguez, To mas Porto Rico 

Dunne, Edward P Connecticut 

Eby/ John Cyril, Phar. D Marylana 

Evans, John E., A.B South Carolina 

Eyestone, Fred L Ohio 

Feinglos, Israel J Maryland 

Feldman, Maurice Maryland 

Ferneyhough, Willie Todd Virginia 

Ferry, Bernard Joseph Pennsylvania 

Finklestein, Max New York 

Flynn, William H Connecticut 

Foard, Fred T., Jr North Carolina 

Foley, Joseph D Connecticut 

Foley, Matthew J Maryland 

Folk, Robert Hami ton, A.B. .South Carolina 

Foxwell, Raymond K Maryland 

Gagnon, Arthur J Rhode Island 



26 



MATRICULATES 1915-1 9 16 



27 



Name. 

Gannon, Clarence Lee. 

Gatsopoulos, Peter N.. 

Gillett, Harold E 

Ginsburg, Jacob B 

Glatzau, Lewis W 



Stale. 

New York 

.Massachusetts 
. . . . New York 

Maryland 

Florida 



Goldman, Harry Maryland 

Gonzales, Jose Felipe Gonzales y 

Porto Rico 

Growt, Bowers H Maryland 

Gruetzner, Edward T Pennsylvania 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Jr Florida 

Gwynn, Humphrey Wilson Florida 

Hahn, Albert Gaither North Carolina 

Hammer, Howell Inskip, Ph.G Maryland 

Hanigan, S. Roscoe Pennsylvania 

Hege, J. Roy North Carolina 

Hennessy, Jay Tyrrell New York 

Howard, Lewis H Maryland 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland 

Hutton, Daniel Cogdell North Carolina 

Jacobson, Benard S Maryland 

Jaffe, Benjamin Meyer Maryland 

Knapp, Lee Henry New Hampshire 

Kritzer, Henry Rowland Virginia 

Ktle, Paul Maxwell West Virginia 

Law, Harry D Maryland 

Lay, Juan A Cuba 

Lazenby, Allen D Maryland 

Light, Ellsworth Emmett Massachusetts 

Long, Clark Samuel Pennsylvania 

Lopez, Eufemio N. Bocanegra, Phar. D. 

Porto Rico 

Lovely, Bernard He?*ry New Hampshire 

Lowsley, Augustus S, California 

Lupton, Charles H North Carolina 

McCamey, Kenneth E Pennsylvania 

McKenna, William H Rhode Island 

McLean, George Maryland 

Machin, Frank H Maryland 

Madden, William L New Jersey 

Marino, Frank C Maryland 

Martin, Frank S Maryland 

Matthai, Jacob Henry Illinois 

Mason, Frank E Maryland 

Maxwell, John A., A.B Connecticut 

Mayo, Woodward B Utah 

Mejias, Francisco J Porto Rico 

Mellor, Royal B Maryland 

Merkel, Henry Anton Maryland 

Miller, John E Vermont 

Miller, Lawrence G Maryland 

Mitchell, Henry S Maryland 



Name. State. 

Morales, Ricardo Ramirez y Porto Rico 

Nevling, Ai Boynton Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Frank P New York 

Nicklas, John M Maryland 

Noell, Robert Holm an North Carolina 

O'Brien, Joseph Gerald Maryland 

O'Brien, Thomas Francis Connecticut 

Oddo, Vincent New York 

Oduber, Jacob: Dutch West Indies 

O'Malley, William F New York 

O'Neill, Gonzalo, Jr New York 

Pasuth, Bartholomew Charles. Connecticut 

Patrick, George R North Carolina 

Payawal, Juan L., A.B Philippine Islands 

Penabaz, Fernando, B.S Cuba 

Peterson, Arthur F Massachusetts 

Pole, Charles A Maryland 

Porter, Lyman R Maryland 

Post, Guy Reyman West Virginia 

Pruitt, Samuel O., A.B South Carolina 

Reier, Adam William Maryland 

Reifschneider, Charles Adam Maryland 

Rice, George William Maryland 

Rigby, Cecil, B.S South Carolina 

Rios, Manuel G. de Quevedo Porto Rico 

Roberts, Joseph John Connecticut 

Rogers, Herbert W Virginia 

Rolenson, Julio R Porto Rico 

Ruzicka, F. Frederick, A.B., A.M. ..Maryland 

Santos-Buch, Angel M., Lit.B Cuba 

Savannah, Joseph G New Jersey 

Shetter, Andrew G Pennsylvania 

Shirkey, Wilbur Fiske, Jr West Virginia 

Short, Noah Hageman West Virginia 

Sloan, William Henry, B.S.... North Carolina 

Snyder, Samuel Maryland 

Stein, Harold Milton New Jersey 

Sternberg, Abraham Tobias Palestine 

Strandberg, Herbert Lawrence. New Jersey 

Suzuki, Yoshio, M.D Japan 

Syrop, Edward Franklin New York 

Tay, Justin Carlton Massachusetts 

Thomas, Edward P Maryland 

Thompson, Edwin Brice Ohio 

Tickle, Thomas Gooch West Virginia 

Van Poole, Carl M North Carolina 

Voss, Norwood W., A.B Maryland 

Wellman, Harrison M Pennsylvania 

Wentz, Maurice Cornelius, B.S Maryland 

Whittle, William Oscar Virginia 

Williams, W. Frederick Maryland 

Wolfe, Humphrey D Maryland 

155 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 



Barishaw, Samuel New Jersey 

Bennbt, Da Costa, A.B Main* 

Bampfield, Fred J Canada Bloom, George Homer Maryland 



Armstrong, Fred Francis. 
Audet, Charles Henry'. . . 



. .Connecticut 
Massachusetts 



28 



MATRICULATES 1915-1916 



X a int. State. 

Bloom, Lawrence H New Jersey 

Bohl, Luis Joseph New Jt rsey 

Bonner, ( >< r \ vies B North Carolina 

wsh \s, Ipolitas B New York 

Burrow 8, Ernest A Massachusetts 

Brynes, Thomas E Massachusetts 

Carlin, Edward J. M New Jersey 

Carroll, II. Roland Maryland 

Champlin, Rot D New York 

Clark, Frederick H Georgia 

Coulox, Frank N New Hampshire 

Covey, William Crockett West Virginia 

Cra u ford-Frost, John I Maryland 

Dauby, W. Arthur Maryland 

Daves, John Thomas Virginia 

Davidson, William B Rhode Island 

Diebolder, Oscar Germany 

Donahue, Cornelius L New York 

Doyle, Joseph F Massachusetts 

Duffy, Vincent P West Virginia 

Ehlers, Reginald G. M., M.D.V.... California 

Eleder, Franklin C Maryland 

Eisenberg, Albert Maryland 

Ephraim, Meyer Maryland 

Fay, Daniel E Maryland 

Fernandez, Luis J Porto Rico 

Frost, Nugent G New York 

Gallagher, William E New York 

Giesen, John Jacob, A.B Virginia 

Hartman, George Otto Ohio 

Hertzog, Francis C Pennsylvania 

Hedrick, Erland H West Virginia 

Hodges, Henry Stuart North Carolina 

Holmes, James Massachusetts 

Howell, James E., B.S North Carolina 

Huff, Wheeler O Maryland 

Johnson, Harley M South Carolina 

Kaufman, Edgar W Pennsylvania 

Ketcherside, Hillary D Arizona 

Kirk, William V West Virginia 

Krause, Louis A. M Maryland 

Koprivich, Milan I. S Serbia 

Labares, Gregory A., A.B. Philippine Islands 

Lasher, Lemuel A Pennsylvania 

Legge, Kenneth D District of Columbia 

McClintock, George L Pennsylvania 

MacGregor, Allan W Connecticut 

Maddison, W. E Utah 

Marston, James Graham, A.B Maryland 

Martin, John Willis Maryland 



Name. State. 

Martinez, Jose Porto Rico 

Melroy, Raymond S Pennsylvania 

M errick, Frank X New York 

Michael, Marion Harlan Maryland 

Miller, Wilfred Porter, M.E New York 

Montgomery, Mathison J Pennsylvania 

Moran, Arthur B Connecticut 

Movers, Emmet D West Virginia 

Mulcahy, Francis J Massachusetts 

Nagourney, Leon New York 

Nohe, C. C West Virginia 

Nolan, Francis F Virginia 

Norris, J. Edward Maryland 

Ogden, Frank N Maryland 

O'Neill, Joseph T Massachusetts 

Peeler, Casper S., B.S Florida 

Peery, Clarence E Virginia 

Porterfield, Marvin H West Virginia 

Reddig, Clarence M m Ph. B Pennsylvania 

Reitzel, Elbert Coy North Carolina 

Reynolds, Paul Emerson Maryland 

Rigau, Gabriel Porto Rico 

Rigby, Samuel B Utah 

Rodriguez, Antonio, Jr Porto Rico 

Salan, Joseph Indiana 

Shaver, William T North Carolina 

Shayt, Louis Maryland 

Silverstein, M ax New York 

Skilling, John G Maryland 

Smith, Leo L Oklahoma 

Smith, Leroy H Maine 

Sorin, Israel C New Jersey 

Stein, Albert Massachtisetts 

Tarkington, Grayson E Arkansas 

Thomas, Kelly C North Carolina 

Tierney, Edward F Rhode Island 

Vaughan, George W Maryland 

Vicwig, Max W We*t Virginia 

Weber, John J Maryland 

Welch, Robert S. G Maryland 

Wheaton, Harry W New York 

Wheeler, Howard Lawrence Maryland 

Whistler, Edward L., A.B Pennsylvania 

White, George L Maryland 

W'illiams, William C North Carolina 

Wolff, Carl O., A.B North Carolina 

Wolford, Roy A West Virginia 

Worrell, Churchill F Virginia 

Yost, Fielding Ernest Lee West Virginia 

105 



SECOND YEAR CLASS. 



Allen, Eustace A., A.B Alabama 

Anderson, Lang W South Carolina 

Andrew, Clarence Pridmore, A.B. 

South Africa 

Bird, La Rue Pennsylvania 

Block, David S Maryland 



Briscoe, Everard Maryland 

Bross, Samuel Isadore Maryland 

Cafritz, Edward Alexandria 

District of Columbia 

Chesbro, Charles C New York 

Clark, Harold C New York 



MATRICULATES 1915-1916 



29 



Name. State. 

Cohn, Alexander Maryland 

Dalton, William B North Carolina 

DeFeo, Charles C Connecticut 

Deliz, Ramon Porto Rico 

Dillon, William M New York 

Fazenbaker, Anderson J Maryland 

1'i.ippin, Eugene Littlejohn.. .North Carolina 

Gavronsky, Samuel New Jersey 

Gleason, John Lewis Connecticut 

Griffith, Wesley Powell, A.B. Pennsylvania 
Hart, Crawford Avery, A.B. North Carolina 

Houde, Arthur J Massachusetts 

Hunter, DeWitt Talmage North Carolina 

Isaacs, Raphael Harris Maryland 

Joyner, James C North Carolina 

Kellam, John Wise Virginia 

Knowles, J. R Maryland 

LaRue, Raymond Ohio 

Leiva, Carlos Rivas Cuba 

Lynch, Raymond A West Virginia 

Macke, Clarence Edgar Maryland 

McDade, Brodie Banks North Carolina 

McLeod, Walter Guy North Carolina 



Name. State. 

Miller, Daniel Maryland 

Morgan, Zachariah Raphael Ma 

Penabaz, Jose A., A.B Cuba 

Pilson, Robert Adrian Maryland 

PUTTERMAN, MORRIS NATHAN Ifttl 

Ridgely, Irwin Oliver, A.B Maryland 

Robles, Charles Walter. . : Florida 

Russell, Frank J Maryland 

Sabiston, Frank North Carolina 

Seal, Gratta Earle West Virginia 

SiNDLER, Joseph Maryland 

Speake, Thomas Carlyle, A.B Maryland 

Sweet, Alfred Norton Connecticut 

Tannenb vim, Frank New York 

Taylor, Joseph R Pennsylvania 

Thaureaux, Eladio Cuba 

Thompson, T. F New Jersey 

Thoner, John George West Virginia 

Trippett, L. H., A.B West Virginia 

Tull, Myron G., A.B Man/land 

White, S. Howard, A.B South Carolina 

Woltz, Charles R Virginia 

55 



FIRST YEAR CLASS. 



Abbott, Lyman Sinclair . . . 

Adams, Edgar P 

Alagia, Damian P 

Alexis, Joseph 

Barker, Frank Talmage... 
Beachley, Ralph Gregory. 

Boone, Walter, Jr 

Brown, James, Jr 

Buchness, John Adam 

Campbell, Arthur Thomas. 

Clauss, Leo Carl 

Crouch, Norman 

Davis, Charles W., A.B 

Davis, John Edward 

Demely, Louis Alvin 

Flaherty, John Joseph 



Missouri 

Maryland 

Maryland 

. .Pennsylvania 

Florida 

Maryland 

.South Carolina 
North Carolina 

Maryland 

. . . .Connecticut 
.... Connecticut 

Maryland 

.North Carolina 

Virginia 

Maryland 

. . . .Connecticut 



Foose, Wilbur C, Phar.D Pennsylvania 

Fort, Wetherbee Maryland 

Franceschi, Francisco Porto Rico 

Geyer, William Glenville Maryland 

Gleason, Joseph H Massachusetts 

Goldsborough, Charles Reubull, A.B. 

Maryland 
Hartenstein, Albert G., PH.CWest Virginia 
Helsabeck, Chester Joseph.. .North Carolina 

Horine, Cyrus Floor Maryland 

Ingram, W. Hawkins Maryland 

Jacobowitz, Aaron Pennsylvania 



John, Baxter Schooley Virginia 

Kane, Leo Vincent, A.B New Jersey 

Kenure, James Thomas, B.S Connecticut 

Lonergan, Paul B Pennsylvania 

Lumpkin, Morgan Le Roy, Ph. B. .. .Maryland 

McElwain, Howard Byer Pennsylvania 

Macis, Salvador A., A.B., B.S. 

Nicaragua, C. A. 

Mayoral, Joaquin Cuba 

Morales, Pablo, Jr Porto Rico 

Morisey, Raymond F North Carolina 

Murphy, Benjamin Russell New Jersey 

Quintero, Ernesto Porto Rico 

Reynolds, Roy Rex Virgin ia 

Richardson, R ■ y W vlters Maryland 

Romine, Carl Chester West Virginia 

Shaw, WlLFRED McLaurin, A.B. 

South Carolina 

Sheppard, Henry, Jr North Carolina 

Sneiderman, Benjamin Robert.. .Connecticut 

Stewart, Ch vrles Wilbi R Maryland 

Tiemeyer, Arthur Charles Maryland 

Timko, Louis Mich vei Pennsylvania 

Vazquez, Rafael Port 

White, Thom \s Francis.. , 

Whitted, Walter Puryear Worth Carolina 

Wild, Albert Connecticut 

Wright, Harold Edson Vew York 

53 



30 SUMMARY OF STUDENTS 

GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1915-16. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 161 

School of Medicine 395 

Department of Law 425 

Dental Department 147 

Department of Pharmacy 103 

Training Schools for Nurses 238 

Total 1469 



GRADUATES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE 

OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

JUNE 1, 1916. 



Name. State, 

Airman, David McAllister Pennsylvania 

Anderson, Franklin B Maryland 

Arnest, Richard Turberville Virginia 

Baggott, Bartus Trew Maryland 

Bawden, George Abner Maryland 

Beck, Foster A Pennsylvania 

Bennett, Percival Robert — North Carolina 

Benson, Edward H Maryland 

Bickley, William Ernest, A.B. 

South Carolina 

Biddle, Benjamin Harrison Ohio 

Bishop, Everett Lassiter Georgia 

Bray, Thomas Latham North Carolina 

Brooke, Charles R Maryland 

Brown, Thomas E., Jr Pennsylvania 

Brumbaugh, Benjamin Bruce, Phir.D. 

Maryland 

Buettner, Henry Fred John Maryland 

Burton, Charles Hammon >. Maryland 

Bryne, Ignatius P. A New York 

Carter, Paul Conway, B.S. . . North Carolina 

Carrasquillo, Honorio F Porto Rico 

Cavallo, Michael Edward New York 

Chandler, James J., A.B South Carolina 

Chaput, Lucien R Massachusetts 

Childs, C. Chapin New York 

Cole, Lewis Furbeck New York 

Coltrane, John W North Carolina 

Compton, A. Fillmore West Virginia 

Cudd, James Erric, A.B South Carolina 

Dillon, William Joseph Massachusetts 

Dominguez, Tomas Porto Rico 

Dunne, Edward P Connecticut 

Evans, John E., A.B South Carolina 

Eyestone, Fred L Ohio 

Feinglos, Israel J Maryland 

Feldman, Maurice Maryland 

Ferneyhough, Willie Todd Virginia 

Ferry, Bernard Joseph Pennsylvania 

Finkelstein, Max New York 

Flynn, William II Connecticut 

Foard, Fred T., Jr North Carolina 

Foley, Joseph D Connecticut 

Folk, Robert Hamilton-, \.B., South Carolina 

Foxwell, Raymond K Maryland 

Gannon, Clarence Lee New York 



Name. State 

Gatsopoulos, Peter N Massachusetts 

Gillett, Harold E New York 

Glatzau, Lewis W Florida 

Goldman, Harry Maryland 

Gonzales, Jose Felipe Gonzales y 

Porto Rico 

Growt, Bowers H Maryland 

Greutzner, Edward T Pennsylvania 

Gwynn, George Humphrey, Jr Florida 

Gwynn, Humphrey Wilson Florida 

Hahn, Albert Gaither Worth Carolina 

Hammer, Howell Inskip, Ph.G Maryland 

Hanigan, S. Roscoe Pennsylvania 

Hege, J. Roy North Carolina 

Hennessy, Jay Tyrrell New York 

Howard, Lewis H Maryland 

Hundley, Frank S Maryland 

Hutton, Daniel Cogdell North Carolina 

Jacobson, Benard S Maryland 

Jaffe, Benjamin Meyer Maryland 

Knapp, Lee Henry New Hampshire 

Kyle, Paul Maxwell West Virginia 

Lazenby, Allen D Maryland 

Light, Ellsworth Emmett Massachusetts 

Long, Clark Samuel Pennsylvania 

Lopez, Eufemio N. Bocanegra, Fhar.D. 

Porto Rico 

Lovely, Bernard Henry New Hampshire 

Lupton, Charles H North Carolina 

Madden, William L New Jersey 

Marino, Frank C Maryland 

Matthai, Jacob Henry- Illinois 

McCamey, Kenneth E Pennsylvania 

McLean, George Maryland 

Mejias, Francisco J Porto Rico 

Merkel, Henry Anton Maryland 

Miller, John E Vermont 

Miller, Lawrence G Maryland 

Morales, Ricardo Ramirez t Porto Rico 

Nevling, Ai Boynton Pennsylvania 

Nicholson, Frank I' New York 

Noell, Robert Holman North Carolina 

O'Brien, Joseph Gerald Maryland 

O'Brien, Thomas Francis Connecticut 

Oddo, Vincent New York 

ODUBER, .) m-dii Dutch West Indies 



31 



32 



PRIZEMEN 



Name. State. 

O'Malley, William F New York 

O'Neill, Gonzalo, Jr New York 

P.'.suth, Bartholomew Charles. .Connecticut 

Patrick, George R North Carolina 

Pexabaz, Fernando, B.S Cuba 

Peterson, Arthur F Massachusetts 

Post, Guy Reyman West Virginia 

Pruitt, Samuel O., A.B South Carolina 

Reier, Adam William Maryland 

Reifschneider, Charles Adam. . .".. .Maryland 

Rice, George William Maryland 

Rigby, Cecil, B.S South Carolina 

Rios, Manuel G. de Quevedo Porto Rico 

Roberts, Joseph John Connecticut 

Rogers, Herbert W Virginia 

Rolenson, Julio R Porto Rico 

Ruzicka, F. Frederick, A.B., A.M. .Maryland 
Santos-Buch, Angel ML. Lit.B Cuba 



Name. State. 

Shirkey, Wilbur Fiske, Jr West Virginia 

Short, Noah Hageman West Virginia 

Sloan, WILLIAM Henry, B.S... North Carolina 

Snyder, Samuel Maryland 

Stein, Harold Milton New Jersey 

Sternberg, Abraham Tobias Palestine 

Strandberg, Herbert Lawrence 

New Jersey 

Syrop, Edward Franklin New York 

Thomas, Edward P Maryland 

Tickle, Thomas Gooch West Virginia 

Van Poole, Carl M North Carolina 

Voss, Norwood W., A.B Maryland 

Wellman, Harrison M Pennsylvania 

Wentz, Maurice Cornelius, B.S Maryland 

Whittle, William Oscar Virginia 

Williams, W. Frederick Maryland 

Wolfe, Humphrey D Maryland 

123 



PRIZEMEN 

UNIVERSITY GROUP 

University Prize— Gold Medal Frank C. Marino 

Certificates of Honor. 

Benard S. Jacobson Honorio F. Carrasquillo 

Harrison M. Wellman Cecil Rigby 

Robert H. Folk. 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS GROUP 

Medal Men. 



Kenneth E. McCamey 
Humphrey D. Wolfe 



Lewis H. Howard 
Guy R. Post. 



Entitled to Honorable Mention. 



D. M. AlKMAN 

E. P. Dunne 



George McLean 
A. F. Peterson. 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND THE 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

UNITED IN 1915, AND HEREAFTER THE TWO SCHOOLS 
WILL BE CONDUCTED AS ONE. 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institutions, 
and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, the entire equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United States. 
It was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 
the College was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other 
colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law and of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four colleges thus united were " constituted an University 
by the name and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of M di- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading medi- 
cal college, especially prominent in the South and widely known 
and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted 
to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867) and of 
Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 

33 



34 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

hospital, and in this hospital intra mural residency for the senior 
student, now available for the whole class, was first established. 

In 1913 juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of 32 years growth. By this association 
the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in facult} r , 
equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated under 
the Legislative enactment in 1872 and established on Hanover 
Street in a building- afterwards known as the Maternite, the first 
obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence 
since 1827, and the College was removed to its present location 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement, medical 
control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, 
and on this foundation in 1899 the present admirable college build- 
ing was erected. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in ac- 
commodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new and 
modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the former building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 






CLINICAL FACILITIES . 35 

etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as a marine hospital for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institution 
give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga streets, then owned by the Wash- 
ington University, in 1875. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly 



36 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the 
Sisters of Mercy with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the corner stone of the 
present Hospital. This building was completed and occupied late 
in 1889. Since then the growing demands for more space has com- 
pelled the erection of additions until now there are accommodations 
for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was^changed from The Baltimore City Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 700,000 
inhabitants and is under the exclusive medical control of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. It adjoins the College building and 
all surgical patients from the public wards are operated upon in the 
College operating rooms. This union of the Hospital and College 
buildings greatly facilitates the clinical teaching as there is no time 
lost in passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric 
Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and its branches. 

During the calendar year of 1915 there were treated in the wards 
of the Hospital 5.084 patients. That the emergency service is very 
large is shown by the fact that during this time 4,386 ambulant 
cases were treated in the accident department. In other out-patient 
departments there were treated 9,205 patients, making a total of 
18,675 ill or injured people who applied for treatment during one year. 

THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The Maryland General Hospital situated at Madison Street and 
Linden Avenue has a capacity of 160 beds and furnishes a large 
amount of clinical material which is under the control of the Faculty 
of Physic for teaching purposes. 

A new operating suite has just been completed, modern in every 
particular and adapted to the teaching of small sections of students. 
There is also a clinical amphitheatre for larger classes of students, 
in close proximity to the wards. The hospital treated during the 
last fiscal year 2980 patients in the ward and 2645 outdoor patients. 
Eleven hundred and seventy-two surgical operations were performed. 

The hospital receives appropriations from the State of Maryland 
and the City of Baltimore for the support of charity cases. 






CLINICAL FACILITIES 37 

FRANKLIN SQUARE HOSPITAL. 

The Franklin Square Hospital has a capacity of 100 beds. 
During the year ending October 1, 1915, 2528 cases were treated in 
the hospital, and 2597 patients were treated in the dispensary. 
Eight hundred surgical operations were performed in the hospital. 

LYING-IN HOSPITALS. 
MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before. The private rooms and wards are modern in all respects, 
and the large increase in clinical material has made it possible to 
o!ier excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland .General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material which is under f ha control 
of the Faculty of Physic. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM. 

This hospital was established by the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1874. It is the pioneer institution of its kind in the 
State of Maryland and one of the first in the country. 

OUT-PATIENT CLINIC AND DISPENSARIES. 

Each of the above hospitals has a well organized out-patient 
department and dispensary, under supervision of graduates in 
medicine who are paid instructors and devote their whole time to 
the supervision of out-door work. 

NUMBER OF PATIENTS. 

During the year ending May 1, 1916, the number of patients 
treated in the Lying-in hospitals connected with the School was 
as follows: 



38 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

Number of Confinements in Hospitals 969 

Number of Confinements, Out-Patient Department 1103 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class. . 35 

THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS-BAY VIEW. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely 
increased by the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow "the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily 
visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the hos- 
pitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in 
amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medi- 
cal teaching. 

The Municipal Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals : 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 

The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution, which' was founded in 1877, largely through 
the efforts of the late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases 
of the Eye and Ear in the University of Maryland, is one of the 
largest special hospitals in the count ry. 

During the year 1914 there were admitted to the Dispensary 
and Hospital, 11,688 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 

SOUTH BALTIMORE EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT CHARITY 

HOSPITAL. 

This hospital, situated in South Baltimore, occupies a new, fire- 
proof building, with a capacity of 45 beds, of which 25 are ward 
beds. It has a large, out-patient department devoted to diseases 
of the eye, ear, nose and throat. Dr. H. E. Peterman is visiting 
surgeon. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 39 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
every modern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as 
well as a most beautiful park-like environment and farm, and is 
closely affiliated with the University of Maryland. 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland 
by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school 
to present to its students liberal opportunities for the study of dis- 
eases of infants and children. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE AND FEEBLE 

MINDED. 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hjospital for the Insane 
This institution is one of the most modern hospitals for the treatment 
and care of the insane in this country, it is well endowed and its super- 
intendent is Dr. Edward N. Brush, Professor of Psychiatry at the 
University of Maryland. In this hospital intensive treatment 
and study of mental diseases is carried on; a large number of the 
patients entering voluntarily. The students under the direction 
of Dr. Brush and his assistants in a series of clinics are shown the 
early manifestations and the various stages of mental diseases, 
the methods of treatment, and their effects. 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane. This hospital contains 
an average of 1000 patients, is attended by Dr. Chas. G. Hill, 
A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry of this faculty. Under the 
direction of Dr. Hill and his assistants the students are given op- 
portunity for the study of large groups of patients showing all 
phases of various mental and nervous disorders. 

Spring Grove State Hospital. This hospital, a state institu- 
tion for the treatment of the insane, has a capacity of 780 beds. 
Dr. J. Percy Wade, associate in Ps3 r chiatry, is the superintendent. 



40 DISPENSARIES 

Students of this school are given a limited number of clinics at 
this institution. 

Springfield State Hospital. This large state institution for 
treatment of mental diseases is situated at Sykesville, Md. Dr. 
J. Clement Clark, Associate Professor of Psychiatry is its superintend- 
ent. There are accommodations for 1400 patients. At this in- 
stitution under charge of a capable director is located a modern 
psychopathic ward where intensive study of the various mental 
diseases is carried on. Each session the students of this school are 
given several clinics by Dr. Clark and his assistants. 

. Rosew t ood State Training School. This hospital situated 
in the suburbs of Baltimore is owned and controlled by the State 
of Maryland. It contains 700 beds devoted to the treatment and 
training of the feeble minded and epileptics. Dr. Frank W. Keat- 
ing is the superintendent and is Instructor in Psycho-Asthenics 
in the University of Maryland. Sections of the Fourth Year class 
are sent to this hospital for instruction in the proper care of feeble 
minded and epileptics. 

DISPENSARIES. 

The three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital, 
Mercy Hospital and the' Maryland General Hospital are organized 
upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may be the same in 
all. Each dispensary has the following departments: Medicine, 
Surgery, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, 
Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Derma- 
tology, Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special departments 
one hour each daj r . 

Some idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching 
is shown by the number of patients treated. For the year 1915 
over sixty-six thousand visits were made to the dispensaries. 

In addition to these the Dental Department, situated upon the 
grounds of the University, conducts a daily clinic which is open 
to medical students. 



DISPENSARY REPORTS 



11 



University Hospital Dispeiisary Report, April, 1915 to April, 1910 



DEPARTMENT 



Surgical 

Medical 

Nervous Diseases. . 

Genito Urinary 

E}-e and Ear 

Women 

Children 

Skin 

Throat and Nose. . . 

Stomach 

Tubercular 

Orthopedic 

Obstetrical 

Diseases of Rectum 



NEW 


OLD CASES 


1,674 


4,082 


1,134 


2,263 


316 


2,539 


558 


1,727 


786 


1,096 


644 


1.075 


605 


931 


385 


842 


529 


645 


345 


709 


345 


616 


109 


589 


231 


74 


52 


110 


7,713 


17,298 



5,756 

3,397 

2,855 

2,285 

1,882 

1,719 

1,536 

1,227 

1,174 

1,054 

961 

698 

305 

162 

25,011 



Grand Total 25,011 



John Houff, M.D., 

Dispensary Physician. 



Mercy Hospital Dispensary Report, Jan. 1st, 1915 to Dec. Slst, 1915 



Surgery 

Genito Urinary . . 

Stomach 

Nose and Throat 

Skin 

Gynecology 

Neurology 

General Medicine 

Children 

Eye and Ear. . . . 
Orthopedics ...... 



NEW- 


NO. 


PATIENTS 






3,368 


1,007 


. '.'94 


571 






1.156 


491 




690 


! 258 


451 


1,294 


1,526 


2.713 


642 


927 


612 


1,077 


70 


34 


8,08 


116 



TOTAL 
VISITS 



4,848 
4,001 
1,620 

J 71 ! 

1,745 

1,539 

104 



B. S. Hanna, M.D., 

Resident Physician. 



42 LABORATORIES 

LABORATORIES. 

ANATOMICAL LABORATORIES. 

These laboratories are in charge of Dr. Smith and his assist- 
ants. The University has recently built its own storage and em- 
balming plant, which supplies an abundance of anatomical material. 
Dissecting tickets must be countersigned as evidence of satisfactory 
dissecting. Anatomical 'material is furnished in abundance, free 
of charge. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of Dr. Simon, 
aided by the Demonstrators. Each student during his course has 
assigned him a table and is fully supplied, with all necessary appa- 
ratus and chemicals, free of charge, except for breakage, which is 
charged at cost price. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department. 

LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory occupies the first floor of Gray Laboratory; it 
includes a large student laboratory, with capacity of forty students, 
a room completely equipped for mammalian experimentation, a 
stock-room, and an office for the professor in charge. Within the 
same building there is an animal room in which there is kept a con- 
stant supply of material for experimentation and demonstration. 
The laboratory is equipped with ample apparatus: there is a com- 
plete set of student apparatus available for each group of two stu- 
dents, while the special apparatus for laboratory experimentation 
and class-room demonstration is adequate for the needs of the 
courses. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteins as well as a detailed course in the 
chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but a 1 so the pathological conditions which may result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 



LABORATORIES 43 

The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, are given 
the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped for teaching Histology and 
Embryology. 

There is a large collection of charts, specimens and apparatus 
used in teaching. The necessary equipment for the practice of 
technique is provided. 

LABORATORIES OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

The subject of special bacteriology is taught during a portion of 
the second year in a well equipped laboratory containing sterilizers, 
water baths, and other necessary equipment for this purpose. 

The subject of histopathology is also taught during the second 
year in a properly equipped laboratory. The details concerning 
this work are described under the subject of Department of Path- 
ology and Bacteriology. 

The instruction in gross pathology is obtained during the third 
year by attendance upon the autopsies at the University Hospital, 
the Mercy Hospital, and the Maryland General Hospital, and 
special instruction in this subject is also given by demonstrations with 
a large amount of pathological material at the City Hospitals situ- 
ated at Bay View. The subject of gross pathology is also taught 
in the third year by means of lectures and demonstrations to sec- 
tions of the third year class and a special effort is made to apply 
this subject to the explanation of the symptoms and clinical signs 
of disease. The instruction in autopsy technique is also given 
personally to small groups of students. 

LABORATORIES OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

These laboratories are fully equipped for the study of practical 
laboratory work in its relationship to clinical medicine. Each 
student is supplied with a locker, containing a microscope and 
sufficient apparatus for any ordinary examination. 



44 LIBRARIES AND MUSEUM 

The wards and out-patient departments of the hospitals furnish 
an abundance of material for study. 

By reason of individual equipment, much work outside of class 
hours is expected of the student. 

The class rooms are adequately lighted, and are conveniently 
situated for teaching purposes. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the 
collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 13,148 volumes, 
a file of 80 current journals, and several thousand pamphlets and 
reprints. During the year ending June 1, 1916, 538 volumes were 
added. It is well stocked with recent literature, including books 
and periodicals of general interest. The home of the Library is 
Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious building in close 
proximity to the class rooms and the laboratories of the Medical 
Department. The Library is open daily during the year, except 
in August, for use of members of the Faculty, the students, and the 
profession generally. 

Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (181,000 volumes), 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library (280,000 volumes) 'and the Library 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. The last named library 
receives the leading medical publications of the world and complete 
sets of many journals are available. 

The libraries are open to students of the Medical School without 
charge. 

The proximity of Washington puts the immense libraries of the 
national capital at the disposal of students of this school. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a separate apartment in the main building. 
It is under the care of the curator, Dr. J. Holmes Smith and is 
assistants. It contains a large collection of anatomical preparations, 
plaster casts, charts, models, etc., used in teaching anatorrry. It 
contains also a number of specimens of comparative anatomy. 
There is a large collection of gross pathological specimens and cut 
sections mounted for demonstration. For the department of obstet- 
rics, there is an excellent collection of normal and abnormal human 
embryos. 



ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS 45 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Two monthly journals are published by the University. The 
University Gazette is devoted to the interests of the entire Univer- 
sity and is published under the auspices of the General Alumni 
Association. The Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of 
Medicine and College of Physicians and Surgeons is the publication 
of the Medical School. Dr. Nathan Winslow is editor. 

ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons 
Four Resident Physicians. 
Two Resident Gynecologists. 
Two Resident Pathologists. 
Three Resident Obstetricians. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of 
the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for 
the summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons. 
Five Resident Physicians. 
One Resident Gynecologist. 
One Resident Obstetrician. 
Two Accident Service Residents. 
One Ambulance Surgeon. 

TO THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Ten Resident Physicians. 

This hospital has a rotating service. Each resident serves a 
term in every department, including the pathological laboratory, 
and Maryland Lying-in Hospital. 

Many appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of this school are eligible. 



46 REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

Each student in the fourth year class is required to spend one 
trimester as resident clinical assistant in the University Hospital 
without extra charge. 

PRIZES. 

Faculty Prize — To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, 
the Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best general 
examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five candidates stand- 
ing next highest. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination, or both, and is essential for admis- 
sion to any class. 

The requirements for the issue of the Medical Student Certificate 
are those prescribed by the rules of the Association of American 
Medical Colleges, of which Association this Faculty is a member, 
and comprise: 

(A) The completion of a standard four-year high school course . 
or its equivalent, and, in addition, 

(B) One year of college credits in chemistry, biology, physics 
and French or German. 

(A) THE HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENT. 

(1) A diploma and transcript of record from a fully accredited 
high school, normal school or academy requiring for admission 
evidence of the completion of a standard course in primary and 
intermediate grades and for graduation, the completion of a standard 
four-year high school course, embracing two years (2 units) of math- 
ematics, two years (2 units) of English, two years (2 units) of a 
foreign language, one year (1 unit) of American History and Civics 
and seven years (7 units) of further credit in language, literature, 
history or science, making the total of units at least fourteen; or, 

(2) An examination in the following branches totaling 14 units: 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 47 

(1) Required, 7 units. 

Mathematics — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 3 years) Algebra and Units. 

Plane Geometry 2 

English — (Minimum 2 years ; maximum 4 years) 2 

A Foreign Language — (Minimum 2 years; maximum 1 years) 2 

U. S. History 1 

Total required units 7 

(2) Elective, 7 units. To be selected from the following: 

English 1 

Mathematics, Algebra, Solid Geometry, Trigonometry 1^ 

Latin, Greek, German, French, Spanish, Scandinavian 13 

History (foreign) 3 

Science, Botany, Zoology, Chemistry, etc 5 

Agriculture , 1 

Drawing 1 

Manual Training 1 

Domestic Science 1 

Music 1 

~28i 

One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subiect for four 
or five periods per week for a year of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to be 
not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 2 semester 
credits or 2 points. 

(B) THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college year shall extend through one college 
session of at least thirty-two weeks of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college year shall be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man year in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college year shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and German or French, each course to embrace 
at least eight semester hours of didactic and laboratory work in 
each subject as shown in the schedule below, provided that a student 
may satisfy the requirement of physics in presenting one unit of 
high school physics and completing a half year of college physics 
which continues and does not duplicate the work done in the high 
school. 

Provided also, that a student may satisfy the requirement of 
French or German by presenting two units of regular high school 
work in either language and completing a half year of college work 
in that language, which continues and does not duplicate the work 



48 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



done in the high school, or by presenting three units of regular high 
school work in French or German. 

In the administration of the entrance requirements of the pre- 
liminary college year conditions may be allowed until September 
1917, amounting to not more than one-half of the requirement in 
physics and one- half of the requirement in a modern language. 

Schedule 



SUBJECT 


LECTURES OR LABORATORY 

RECITATIONS PERIODS 

PER WEEK PER WEEK 


TOTAL HOURS TOTAL 8EME9- 
PER TER HOURS 
SEMESTER PER YEAR 


Physics (1) 


2 2 
9 2 


4 

4 8 


Chemistry (1) 


Biology (1) 


2 or 3 2 or 1 


4 8 
4 or 3 8 or G 


German or French (2) . . . . 


4 or 3 




Total 10 6 or 5 


16 or 15 32 or 30 



Each laboratory period must extend over at least two hours. 



Or, expressed in class hours 



Physic? (I) 

Chemistry (1) 

Biology (1) 

German or French (2) 

Total , 



TOTAL HOURS TOTAL HOURS 
LECTURES OR LABORATORY 

RECITATIONS WORK 



64 

64 

64 or 96 

128 or 96 



128 

128 

128 or 64 



320 



384 or 320 



TOTAL MINI- 
MUM HOURS 
DIDACTIC AND 
LABORATORY 



192 

192 
128 or 160 
128 or 96 



704 or 640 



All such conditions shall be removed before registration for the 
second year. 

The valuation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 
iner only, and all students whose entrance qualifications are not 
clearly satisfactory, or whose certificates are not complete, are 
advised to obtain from him or from the Dean blank forms on which 
to prepare a full statement of their previous education, in advance to 
their coming to Baltimore. Such statements to be submitted 
to the Entrance Examiner for his advice as to the course to be 
pursued. 






COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE 49 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Gtis, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. To him must be sub- 
mitted the credentials of all applicants, and by him is issued the 
certificate upon which the student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 
medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 
ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course difficulties 
may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, with- 
out being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examina- 
tion, may receive a certificate of attendance. 

After January 1, 1918, tiro years of college work will be required 
for admission to the course in Medicine. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. founded in 1696, is by con- 
tract of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of 
Arts and Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's 
College and who have made an approved choice of electives may 
if they desire it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical 
School of the University. If they successfully complete the work 
of the first medical year they are graduated with their class with 
the degree of A.B., from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work 
of the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and 
for four 3 r ears he is a resident in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seventh year the M.D. degree, but credit from the 
Medical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit 
has already been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

In order to meet the increased requirements for matriculation 
taking effect January 1, 1914, a special Pre-Medical Course in 
Chemistry, Physics, Biology and French or German is now offered 
in St. John's College. 



50 RULES 

GRADUATES OF PHARMACY. 

( Graduates of recognized Colleges of Pharmacy will be given credit 
for the work which they have done in Chemistry and Materia Medica 
and will be excused from the lectures, laboratory work and recita- 
tions upon these subjects in the Freshman Year. The fee for the 
Freshman Year to Graduates of Pharmacy will be $125. 

RULES. 

1. Tickets for practical anatomy must be countersigned by the 
proper demonstrators. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket 
will not be accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. All students are required to stand the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to enter 
the third-year class who has not completed all first-year work, and 
no student will be permitted to enter the fourth-year class who has 
not completed all second-year work, nor shall a student be ad- 
vanced from a lower to a higher class if he is conditioned in more 
than one major and one minor subject. 

3. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
Dean before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

4. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course 
he must pay regular fees. 

5. A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the 
fourth year and to take examinations in such other branches as may 
be required, should he be again permitted to enter the school as a 
candidate for graduation. 

6. Students are required to pay for breakage and to make a de- 
posit on this account. The unexpended balance will be returned 
at the end of the session. 

7. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his final 
examination. 

Al the above rules, as well as the fees stated be'ow, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1917, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees and 
all the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 






SCHOLARSHIPS 5 J 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year). $5.00 

Tuition fee (each year) 165 . 00 

Graduation fee 30.00 

There are no extra charges for instruction in any department, 
or for laboratory courses, except for breakage, and in special cases 
for materials consumed. 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the en- 
tire amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tui- 
tion fee for that year will be $160. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning 
October 1, 1915. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first 
full course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses not less than $25 each. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
The Dr. Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as 
a memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this 
University, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment 
of the tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, 
"to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the 
judgment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pe- 
cuniary assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student only, who has successfully completed one year's work in 
the medical course, and no student may hold such scholarship for 
more than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles 
M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 



52 NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of 
inability to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to 
"a needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School. 

"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by 
the Faculty of Physic to a student of the Senior Class who presents 
to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and 
that he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of student's personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual 
experience: 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 



53 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books 

College Incidentals 

Board, eight months 

Room rent ' 


$ 18 

96 
48 
35 
10 


8 32 

5 

112 

65 

50 

20 


S 50 

10 

128 

80 


Clothing and washing 

All other expenses 


100 
75 


Total 


$207 


$284 


S443 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N.E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the 
Superintendent of Buildings, who may be found at his office on the 
premises, will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient 
boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts for students. 

For further information apply to either 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D., Dean, 
Caleb Winslow, A.M., Registrar. 
Lombard and Greene Streets. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 

The following curriculum is the result of a recent and thorough 
revision of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery 
necessitates a very crowded course and the question of electives is 
one which very soon will be depended on to solve some of the 
difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under ten departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Chemistry including Physiological Chemistry. 

4. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

5. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

6. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

7. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

8. Obstetrics. 



54 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

9. Gynecology. 

10. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thrown together in 
the same course of te'aching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body and laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The third and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of teachers insures attention to the 
needs of each student. 

In many courses the final examinations as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 
largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work 
carried on throughout the course. 

ARRANGEMENT OF CLASSES. 

All the teaching of the freshman class is done at Calvert and 
Saratoga Streets. All the teaching of the sophomore class is done 
at Lombard and Greene Streets. 

The junior class has two hours of didactic teaching each morning. 
For clinical instruction and laboratory work this class is divided into 
two sections and the year into semesters. Each section will work 
for one semester at the University Hospital and one semester at 
Mercy Hospital. 

The senior class is divided into three sections and for this class 
the year is divided into trimesters. Each section receives clinical 
instruction for one trimester in the University Hospital, Mercy Hos- 
pital and the Maryland General Hospital. Each section when 
assigned to the University Hospital will be given rooms adjacent 
to the hospital without additional charge. In the afternoon the 
whole class is assembled and has two hours of didactic teaching each 
day. 

This distribution of the classes is made in order to utilize to the 
best advantage the laboratory space and to bring the students into 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 55 

daily contact with patients in all three of the large hospitals and 
dispensaries. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY INCLUDING HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

A. C. Pole, M.D Professor of Descriptive Anatomy 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D. 

Professor of Histology and Embryology and Assistant in Anatomy 

J. W. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

J. L. Wright, M.D Associate in Anatomy and Histology 

Fred. Rankin, A.M., M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

First Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. 

This course embraces the integuments, myology, angiolo^y. 
osteology, syndesmology and the peripheral nerves. 

Laboratory. Ten hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in his 
work by competent demonstrators. Examinations are held at 
regular intervals throughout the session, and each student will be 
held to strict account for material furnished him. 

Osteology. Two hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations, and recitations. Each student is furnished 
a skeleton and a deposit is required to insure its return at the end 
of the session. 

Second Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. Lectures, recitations and conferences. 

Laboratory. Ten hours each week for sixteen weeks. This 
course ncludes topographical and applied anatomy of the body 
cavities and viscera and the cerebro-spinal and sympathetic ner- 
vous systems with special demonstrations of important subjects 
to the class in small sections. 

The teaching of anatomy is illustrated by means of charts, dia- 
grams, special dissections and the projection apparatus. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, nine 
hours each week during first semester; three hours each week dur- 
ing second semester. The most important part of the work will be 



56 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

done in the laboratory, where each student will be provided with a 
microscope, apparatus, staining fluids and material necessary for 
the preparation of specimens for microscopical examination. An 
important aid to the course is the projection microscope which is 
used for the projection upon a screen of magnified images of the 
specimens actually used in the laboratory. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; six hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick, 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryology. In 
the laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages 
of development, and sections of the chick at different periods of 
incubation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter 
part of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through 
different regions of a mammal. • 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Physiology 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

G. W. Hemmeter, M.D Associate in Physiology 

Firmadge K. Nichols, A.B., M.D Associate in Physiology 

Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D Associate in Physiology 

The course in Physiology extends throughout the First and Second 
Years. It consists of a series of lectures, covering the field of human 
physiology, laboratory work, demonstrations, and frequent recita- 
tions. It is constantly in the mind of the department that this 
course is introductoiy to the study of medicine. The recitations 
cover the subject-matter of the lectures and the experiments per- 
formed in the laboratory. 

First Year. 1. This course includes lectures and recitations 
upon the physiology of the blood and circulation, muscle and nerve, 
a portion of the central nervous system, and special senses, and such 
chemical and physical facts as are necessary for a proper understand- 
ing of the physiology taught. Two lectures. and a recitation weekly 
throughout the year. Dr. McGlone. 

Second Year. 2. Didactic instruction. During this year the 
remaining topics of physiology are covered by lectures and demon- 






ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 57 

strations. As in the first year frequenl recitations will be held. 
The subject-matter includes the physio];,-;, of respiration, digestion 
and secretion, nutrition, eye and ear, ;■■ anial central nervous 

system. Lectures, demonstrations, and recitations, three hours 
per week. Dr. Hemmeter, assisted by Drs. Conser or McGlone. 

3. Experimental Physiology. This is a laboratory course in the 
dynamics of muscle and nerve studies in circulation and respiration, 
and physiology of the special sens i from the acquisition of 
the facts of physiology, the student is taught to observe accurately, 
record carefully the results of his observations, and from the 
suits draw an independent conclusion. He is also trained in the 
use of instruments which are. of value to him in his clinical years. 
Three hours weekly throughout the year. Drs. McGlone, Conser, 
Nichols and Collenberg. 

4. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a Laboratory course 
intended for advanced Laboratory students (optional) who may 
wish to do special work in this line of physiology. Hours to be 
arranged. Dr. McGlone. 

5. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students will be 
admitted to the laboratory which is well adapted for post-graduate 
study and special research. Hours will be arranged to suit in- 
dividuals. Dr. John C. Hemmeter. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

G. Howard 'White, A. B., MD. Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D Associate Professor of Chemistry 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

First Year Organic Chemistry. 1. Lectures and Recitations; 
two hours per week throughout the session. 

The method adopted for the study of carbon compounds is to 
lead the student from the consideration of the most simply consti- 
tuted bodies to those of more and more complex composition. Much 
stress will be laid on the reasons which justify the adoption of the 
prevalent views in regard to the structure of carbon compounds. 
During the study of the various groups those substances which are 
of more general interest to the medical student will be specially 
considered. 

2. Laboratory work Four hours per week during the session. 

A course of carefully selected experiments, performed by the 
student in the laboratory serves to impart a clear idea of the mani- 



58 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

fold changes which organic compounds undergo. He learns here 
much by witnessing the actual building up of complex carbon com- 
pounds by synthetical methods and sees the breaking down of others 
into simpler forms of matter. 

Second Year. Organic and Physiological Chemistry. 1. Lec- 
tures and recitations. One hour per week throughout the session. 

This course includes the study of general organic chemistry with 
special attention to the more important carbon compounds which 
are of particular importance to the student of medicine, with refer- 
ence to their relations to physiology, pathology and clinical medicine. 

2. Laboratory Work. Six hours per week for one semester. 

This includes a study of the properties of the food stuffs, their 
decomposition and metabolic products, digestion, the blood, chem- 
istry of the secretions and excretions, and the various abnormal 
compounds resulting from perverted metabolism. The student 
will be expected to familiarize himself with the manipulation of the 
apparatus in use in the study of the various secretions, excretions 
and fluids of the body. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA AND PHARMACOLOGY. 

Samuel J. Fort, M.D Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D Associate in Materia Medica 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate in Pharmacology 

First Year. Two hours per week throughout the session, didac- 
tic lectures on Materia Medica. Dr. Fort. 

A laboratory course in Pharmacy and prescription writing, two 
hours per week. Dr. Sinsky. 

Second Year. Two hours per week throughout the session on 
Pharmacology. Dr. Fort. 

A laboratory course of two hours per week throughout the session, 
on the physiological and toxicological action of the more important 
drugs. Dr. Wylie. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

H. R. Spencbr, M.D.. .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 
Wm. Greenfeld, M.D.. . .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 
Caleb W. G. Rohrer, A.M., M.D., PhD. . .Associate Professor of Pathology 

Harry W. Stoner, M.D Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Associate in Bacteriology 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 59 

Instruction in histopathology and in special bacteriology is given 
in the laboratories to the students of the second year The course 
in histopathology includes the demonstrations of the common 
lesions of the various viscera, and the subject of general pathology 
including inflammation, degeneration and infiltration and tumors. 
The typical gross lesions are also exhibited during this course. 

In special bacteriology the various methods of sterilization and 
preparation of culture material, the study of the pathogenic micro- 
organisms both of animal and vegetable origin, and the bacteriologi- 
cal study of milk, water, sewage and other such materials, are given. 
The bacteriological diagnosis of the infectious diseases is also included 
in this course. Animal inoculations and autopsies are performed 
in connection with the bacteria studied, and the diagnoses by means 
of serum reactions are also given. 

In the third year the subject of gross pathology is taught by means 
of museum specimens to groups of students, and the special relation- 
ship of gross and microscopic lesions to clinical symptoms and signs 
of disease is especially emphasized. Autopsy technique is also 
taught to small groups of students by special instruction at theautop- 
sies performed at the various hospitals, and the specimens obtained 
at such autopsies are demonstrated to the entire class. Vaccine 
therapy and the animal parasites are also taught in this year. 

In the fourth year the specimens from autopsies are studied with 
reference to clinical histories and gross and microscopic anatomy. 
Special emphasis is laid upon the correlation of the anatomical 
findings with the clinical symptoms and diagnosis. The demonstra- 
tions are also illustrated with sections of fixed material by means of 
lantern slides. 

Courses in surgical and gynecological pathology are also given to 
the fourth year students, but these courses are under the direction 
of the Departments of Surgery and Gynecology. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE AND HYGIENE. 

Nathaniel G, Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence 
Joseph T. Smith, M.D Professor of Hygiene 

Second Year. One hour each week for entire session. 

Medical Jurisprudence. This course embraces consideration of 
medical evidence and testimony, confidential communications, 
malpractice, indications of death, pregnancy, delivery, infanticide 
and insanity. 



60 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D.. LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D Professor of Surgery 

John W. Chambers, M.D., Sc.D Professor of Surgery 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. D. Blake, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery and Surgical Pathology 

.Joseph H. Branham, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Albert T. Chambers, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

John G. Jay, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M.. M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Alfred Ullman, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph \V. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

William W. Requardt, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate Professor of Cliincal Surgery 

Robert P. Bay, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Harvey B. Stone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D... Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

Arthur G. Barrett, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Frank J. Kirby, M.D Associate in Surgery 

Fred Rankin, A.M., M.D Associate in Surgery 

B. M. Bernheim, A.B., M.D Lecturer on Blood Vessel Surgery 

Howard D. Lewis, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M. D Assistant in Surgery 

The course in surgery is progressive, and aims to ground the stu- 
dent firmly in the principals of surgical science in order that later 
he may be prepared to build upon a firm foundation the superstruc- 
ture of surgical art. 

Second Year. During this year a practical course of bandaging 
is given upon the manikin; the student being required to apply person- 
ally the various forms of bandages to the different parts of the body. 

Third Year. Surgical Pathology and Principles of Surgery. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 61 

Lectures, recitations and clinics, three hours weekly. Drs. Shipley 
and Warfield. 

The class is divided in sections and receives instruction in history 
taking, gross surgical pathology and surgical diagnosis at the bed- 
side and in the dead house in the City Hospitals at Bay View. Drs. 
Shipley and Lynn. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections and each 
section is given practical and individual work under the supervision 
of the instructors. 

This course begins with the study of the general principles of opera- 
tive surgery; anaesthesia, asepsis, antisepsis, description of instru- 
ments and sutures, etc. 

The various operations are first described and demonstrated by the 
instructor, and the student afterw r ard practices them upon the subject. 

The entire subject of operative surgery is fully covered. Dr. Mar- 
tin and assistants. 

The class will be divided into small sections for Dispensary service 
in the University and Mercy Hospitals. 

Fourth Year. Fractures and Dislocations. Illustrated by charts, 
drawings, specimens, X-ray demonstrations, lantern slides, and the 
balopticon, two hours a week for the first semester. Dr. Winslow. 

Surgery of the Blood Vascular System, Hernia, Surgery of the 
Scrotum and its contents, one hour a week for the first semester. 
Dr. Warfield. At the end of this semester, an examination will be 
given. 

Surgery of the Thorax and Thoracic Wall and of the Abdominal 
Cavity, two hours a week for the second semester. Dr. Harrison. 

Surgery of the Head, Neck, and Spinal Cord, one hour a week 
for the second semester. Dr. Chambers. 

Surgical ( linics. Surgical clinics will be given at the University, 
Mercy, and Maryland General Hospitals, weekly, to one third of 
the class in each hospital. Drs. Winslow, Warfield, Chambers, and 
Harrison. 

The class is divided into sections for ward instruction in surgery, 
for instruction in operative surgery and snrgical diagnosis, and the 
post-operative treatment of surgical conditions, six days a week for 
two hours each day in each of the three hospitals. Drs. Winslow, 
Shipley, Warfield, Chambers, Harrison, Martin and McGlannan. 



62 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

ANAESTHESIA. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D Associate Professor of Anaesthesia 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate Professor of Anaesthesia 

Fred Rankin, A.M., M.D Associate in Anaesthesia 

Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S Instructor in Anaesthesia 

A. M. Evans, M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

The administration of anaesthetics is taught didactially and prac- 
tically and students are required to administer anaesthetics under 
the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S.,L.S.A.,M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Demonstrator of Dermatology 

Clinical conference one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of 
the skin. Drs. Gilchrist and Rosenthal. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the common 
skin diseases. First trimester, Dr. Ketron; second trimester, Dr. 
Abercrombie; third trimester, Drs. Abercrombie and Ketron. Dis- 
pensary instruction, Mercy Hospital, Dr. Rosenthal. 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Demonstrator in Orthopedic Surgery 

John Evans, M.D Instructor in Roentgenology 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

Louis A. Buie, A.B., M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given. This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheater and Dispensary, Maryland General and 
Mercy Hospitals and Dispensaries, Kernan Hospital and Industrial 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 63 

School for Crippled Children at "Radnor Park," and in the Dis- 
pensary of same at 2000 North Charles Street. 

The senior class will be divided into three parts, each section spend- 
ing one trimester in the University, Mercy and Maryland General 
Hospitals in rotation; and by the avoidance of duplication, the sub- 
ject will be adequately covered. Lectures, clinics and quizzes 
will be held at each of the three hospitals once a week. If possible, 
in addition, a weekly bed-side clinic will be held on Saturdays for 
small sections of the class at "Radnor Park." 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and instru- 
ments required in this surgical specialty, including X-Ray technique; 
Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; deformities of the 
feet; non-tuberculous deformities of the feet and joints; the paraly- 
ses; the bursal, tendinous and muscular conditions producing ortho- 
pedic affections; rickets; scurvy; osteomalacia; chondrodystrophies; 
wry-neck and the use and application of orthopedic apparatus. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

John R. Winslow, A.B.,M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
H. C. Davis, M.D.. .Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
George Murgatroyd, M.D.... Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

William Caspari, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Third Year. Clinical Lectures. One hour each week through- 
out the session. Drs. Merrick, John R. Winslow, and Sanger. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily in small sections 
at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy Hospitals. Ward 
classes one hour each week at the University, Maryland General, 
and Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. B. Wolf, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D.. Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 
Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D. 

Associate Professor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 



64 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

The course, which is entirely clinical, is taught chiefly by personal 
instruction in the dispensaries of the University, Mercy and Maryland 
General Hospitals, one trimester being spent at each hospital. 
The student assumes the responsibility of certain cases under the 
supervision of instructors. 

The course includes the diagnosis, pathology and treatment of 
venereal diseases and syphilis together with a careful study of the 
less common genito-urinary diseases. The course includes instruc- 
tion in urinalysis, in endoscopic and cystoscopic examinations and 
the use of other instruments for the diagnosis and treatment of 
genito-urinary diseases. Many minor operations are performed in 
the out-patient department by students under the supervision of 
the chiefs of clinic. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This course is for instruction in diseases of the 
Colon, Sigmoid Flexure, Rectum and Anus. 

One lecture a week throughout the year will be given in the Clini- 
cal Amphitheater of the Hospitals. The lecture will cover the 
essential features of the Anatomy and Physiology of the large in- 
testine; as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. The 
importance of diseased conditions and malpositions of the intestines, 
in relation to systemic disturbances, will be emphasized by demon- 
strations. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the wards and 
dispensaries of the University, Mercy, and Maryland General Hos- 
pitals, where different phases of the various diseases will be taught 
by direct observation and examination. The use of the proctoscope 
and sigmoidoscope in examination of the rectum and sigmoid will 
be made familiar to each student. 

A course in Proctoscopy will be given in the City Hospitals at 
Bay View, where abundance of material is always obtainable. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



65 



DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.I). 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

Ernest Zueblin, M.D. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D. 

Chas. G. Hill, A.M., M.D. 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D. 

John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Thomas W. Keown, AB., M.D. 

Wm. I. Messick, M.D. 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D 

A. H. Carroll, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D 
J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D. 
John E. O'Neill, M.D 
G. F. Sargent, M.D. 
J. Wesley Cole, M.D. 
Frank W. Keating, M.D. 
G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D. 
J. F. Hawkins, M.D. 

D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D. 

E. E. Mayer, M.D. 
John S. Fenby, M.D. 

E. Le Compte Cook, M.D. 
Frank J. Powers, M.D. 
Chas. B. Wheltle, M.D. 
J. W. V. Clift, M.D. 

L. M. C. Parker, M.D. 
0. V. Linhardt, M.D. 

F, E. Shipley, M.D. 



John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D.. 

Sc.D., LL.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 
Chas. E. Simon, A.B., M.D. 
Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D. 
Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. 
Chas. O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., 

LL.D. 
J. M. Craighill, M.D. 
Chas. W. McElfresh, M.D. 
Jas. A. Nydeger, A.M., M.D., Sc.D. 
C.Hampson Jones, M.B., CM., M.D 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., D.Sc 
Pearce Kintzing, M.D. 
E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D 
J. Clement Clark, M.D. 
Hubert C. Knapp, M.D 
H. J. Maldeis, M.D. 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D. 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D. 
Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 
J. Percy Wade, M.D. 
ft. C. Metzel, M.D. 
Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D. 
W. Milton Lewis, M.D 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D 
W. P. E. Wise, M.D. 
H. U. Todd. 
J. J. O'Mara, M.D. 

B. S. Hanna, M.D. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D. 

C. W. Rauschenbach. M Q 
J. E. Brumback, M.D. 

J. G. Stiepbl, M.D. 



66 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations 
in medical topography and the physical conditions in health, pre- 
paratory to the course in physical diagnosis in the third year. Two 
and one-half hours each week during the second semester. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each 
section receives instruction for the entire session in the medical 
dispensaries of the hospitals. During the second semester, the 
students under the supervision of instructors examine and treat 
patients in the medical dispensaries. During one semester small 
groups are sent for the afternoon to the city hospitals at Bay View 
for special instruction in history taking and physical diagnosis. 
Two hours a week throughout the year is devoted to physical diag- 
nosis. Full class conferences one hour a week throughout the 
session. 

CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

Third Year. A laboratory course, supplemented by lectures 
and recitations is given throughout the year to the entire class. 
Four hours a week is devoted by each student to laboratory study 
with sufficient instructors to insure careful work. Each student 
is required to rent at a nominal figure a microscope which he is 
permitted to use where and when he likes, being encouraged 
to use the laboratories at other times than those required. This 
course is essentially practical, and the student is thoroughly trained 
in the chemical and microscopical study of the blood, urine, spu- 
tum, feces, and the physiological and pathological secretions and 
excretions. 

Fourth Year. Four hours a week is devoted to advanced labor- 
atory work with small groups in the special studies of the blood, 
etc., as required for blood cultures, Wassermanns, and other diag- 
nostic methods. In addition, each student is required in his course 
in clinical medicine to do the necessary laboratory examinations 
of the patients assigned to him. 

CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations on the principles of medi- 
cine, for three hours a week throughout the session. Clinical con- 
ference, one hour each week throughout the session. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION' 67 

Fourth Year. Lectures, recitations and clinics to the entire 
class three hours a week throughout the session. 

A clinical pathological conference is held once a week through- 
out the session, at which the material obtained through operations 
or at autopsy is studied in relation to the clinical findings. 

The whole class, divided between the three hospitals and again 
subdivided into small groups, receives bedside instruction twelve 
hours a week throughout the session and has the care of the hospital 
patients under the direct supervision of the hospital staff, making 
all examinations and keeping the clinical history of the patient. 

During one trimester the student must live in the hospital dor- 
mitories, and in this manner receive experience as an intern. 

Dispensary instruction is given nine hours a week in the special- 
ties of medicine. 

PEDIATRICS. 

Third Year. Lecture recitation one hour a week throughout 
the session. 

Fourth Year. Clinic recitation one hour a week throughout 
the year and in addition ward class instruction to small groups one 
hour a week during one trimester. 

Dispensary instruction in pediatrics is given to small groups 
throughout the year. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

Physical Therapeutics. This course consists of weekly lectures 
and demonstrations on hydrotherapy, thermotherapy, massage, 
rest and exercise, the Weir Mitchell Treatment, radiotherapy and 
electrotherapeutics. The basic physiologic principles and actions 
of the above mentioned agencies are given full consideration and 
study, and the practical application is observed in the hospital and 
clinic and in visits to various institutions having well equipped 
departments for treatment by physical means. 

Third Year. This course is supplementary to that on clini- 
cal medicine and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. (One hour a week.) 

Fourth Year. This subject is covered in conjunction with the 
teaching of clinical medicine. 



08 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY. 

Fourth Year. Clinic recitation to each third of the class for 
one hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction 
to small groups during part of the session. Practical instruction 
in the wards in the differential diagnosis of diseased conditions of 
the alimentary tracr. 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

A practical course is given in the tuberculosis dispensary and 
at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital to small groups, the 
abundance of the material, both of "incipient" and "advanced cases" 
making this course of value in the practical recognition of the 
physical signs of the disease. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to 
entire class throughout the year. This course comprises the study 
of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the method 
of neurological examination, and relationship of signs and symptoms 
to pathological conditions. The material at the University, Mary- 
land General, and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical lectures and recitations; one hour each 
week throughout the entire session. 

Clinical Conference, one hour each week to the entire class. This 
subject is taught at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully ex- 
amined; complete written records are made by the students who 
demonstrate the cases before the class. These cases are usually 
assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and each 
student in the class must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections, tw 7 o hours each week 
during entire year at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal 
contact with the cases in the wards under the supervision of the 
instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals four afternoons each week. In this way students are 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



69 



brought into contact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well 
as later manifestations. 

Electro Therapeutics. Instruction in the uses of the various 
types of electrical apparatus is given by lectures and demonstra- 
tions in the clinics, the ward classes, and the out-patient depart- 
ment. 

PSYCHIATRY. 

Fourth Year. This subject is taught by means of didactic 
and clinical lectures. Abundant material is at the command of 
this department in the various institutions which are presided over 
by the teachers in psychiatry. The student is brought into contact 
with the early manifestations of mental disease in the dispensaries 
of the University, Maryland General, and Mercy Hospitals, and 
in a series of clinics opportunity is afforded to observe the course 
and later manifestations of the disease, often in these same patients, 
at the Sheppard Enoch Pratt Hospital, Springfield State Hospital, 
Spring Grove State Hospital, Mount Hope Retreat, Maryland Train- 
ing School for the Feeble Minded, and City Detention Hospital. 

STATE MEDICINE. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations one hour each 
week to the entire class throughout the session. 

The course in state medicine begins with a study of structure 
and function of the social organism, as revealed by the numerical 
analysis of population, births, deaths, sickness and migration. 
Elementary instruction and practice are given in vital statistics; 
in medical notification, registration and certification; and in the 
laws and ordinances concerning public health. The specific hy- 
giene of the preventable diseases is next taken up, such choice be- 
ing made as will familiarize the student with the epidemiology of 
the more important communicable diseases, and with the main 
instruments of prevention: notification, inspection, segregation, 
isolation, immunization and disinfection. The course is planned 
from the view point of official practice in public hygiene. 

TROPICAL MEDICINE. 

A course of lectures on tropical diseases was instituted in Jan- 
uary, 1913, by Dr. James A. Nvdegger of the U. S. P. H. Service 



70 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

One lecture is given each week to the members of the Senior Class, 
frequently by Government officials who are recognized authorities 
on diseases peculiar to the tropics. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

L. E. Neale, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bergland Associate in Obstetrics 

H. N. Freeman, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

M. E. Douglass, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Wm. B. Schapiro, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each week 
by Drs. Neale and Dobbin to entire class. Special obstetric 
and gynecologic pathology three hours each week by Drs. Brent 
and Lazenby to class sections in the Pathologic Laboratory. 
Clinical Obstetrics (bedside and manikin work) three hours each 
week at the University Hospital by Dr. Neale and his assistants, 
and at the Mercy Hospital by Drs. Brack, Litsinger, Lazenby and 
Novak. 

Examinations, one at end of first semester and final one at end 
of the year. The results of these examinations considered in . con- 
junction with the student's practical work, will determine the 
grade for the year's work, which grades, if sufficient to give student 
advanced standing, will count as one-half of the final grade in 
Obstetrics. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and Clinical Conferences. Two hours 
each week to the entire class. Drs. Neale, Dobbin and Rowland. 

Ward Classes and Operative Obstetrics (Manikin work). Four 
hours each week to sections of the class. 

Students are required to attend obstetric cases before, during 
and after confinement in the University Hospital, Maryland Ly- 
ing-in Hospital and Maryland Lying-in Asylum, as well as in the 
out-patient department conducted by each hospital. Each student 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 71 

is required to conduct and make accurate records of at least twelve 
confinement cases. These out-patient cases are conducted under 
the supervision of post-graduate instructors, three in number, who 
devote their whole time to this work. 

Mid-year and final examinations will be held, the results of which, 
considered in conjunction with clinical work and recitations, will 
make up the remaining half of the final grade. 

This School is peculiarly fortunate in the clinical material avail- 
able for this important branch of medical teaching; more than 2000 
cases in the three hospitals and their out-patient departments make 
a practically inexhaustible clinic. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

W. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Geo. A. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. jG. Willse, M.D • Demonstrator of Gynecology 

W. K. White, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

H. S. Street, B.S., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

J. M. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

L. H. Douglass, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Third Year. Didactic Work. Lectures and recitations one hour 
each week throughout the session. 

Laboratory. Special pathology, both gross and microscopical, 
studied in connection with the clinical history of each specimen, 
three hours each week for one semester. 

Fourth Year. Didactic Work. Lectures and recitations one 
hour each week throughout the session. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course a student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward, makes a general physical examination including the blood 
and urine, before the patient is brought before the class. One stu- 
dent under supervision gives the anesthetic, a pelvic examination 
is made by six students, and any operation required is then done 
before a section of the class small enough to see clearly what is 



i* CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

being done and how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole 
group examine microscopically sections prepared from material 
removed from patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D.. .Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D... .Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Wm. Tarun, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. E. Peterman, MiD Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D Associate in Otology 

G. A. Fleming, M.D Demonstrator of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph.. Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology 
R. D. West, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Third Year. Practical Course in the anatomy, gross and micro- 
scopic, and in the physiology of the eye and the ear; this course con- 
sists of dissections, microscopic sections, demonstration on models, 
etc., once weekly throughout one half the year. — Dr. Tarun. 

Practical Course in the Methods of Examination of the eye, includ- 
ing the use of the ophthalmoscope, and of the ear, including the 
tests of the auditory apparatus. — Drs. Fleckenstein and Downey. 

Fourth Year. Didactic Course in Diseases of the Eye once 
weekly October to February, Dr. Woods; February to close of 
session, Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

Didactic Course in Diseases of the Ear, Dr. Crouch once weekly 
for half the year. 

Clinics in diseases of the eye and ear to sections of the class once 
weekly, by Drs. Harry Friedenwald, Woods and Crouch. 

Dispensary Instruction to small sections. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye and 
ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet the needs 
of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is laid upon the re- 
lation between diseases of the eye and the ear and systemic diseases 
of other organs. 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 73 

THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 
Mary E. Sullivan, R.N., M.U.II. 1911, Superintendanl of Training Schools. 

The University Hospital Training School for Nurses was organized 
December 14, 1889, and offers a three years' course of training. 

Those wishing to obtain the course of instruction must apply 
personally or by letter to the Superintendent of Nurses, who will 
furnish printed instructions respecting the personal information 
to be given by applicants. Letters of application should be accom- 
panied by a statement from a clergyman testifying to good moral 
character and from a physician certifying to sound health and 
unimpaired faculties. Applicants must be between twenty-one 
and thirty-five years of age, of at least average height and physique, 
and must give satisfactory evidence of fitness in disposition and 
temperament for the work of nursing. 

If approved, applicants are received into the school for a period 
of six months on probation, during which time demonstration classes 
are held, and instruction is given in the elementary part of the 
training. 

Classes are formed and pupils are received in the spring and 
autumn. 

High school graduates and women of higher education are given 
the preference. Their superior preparation makes them better 
fitted for the opportunities that are opening up in the profession 
of nursing. Graduates of this school are eligible for Red Cross 
and all Government work. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness of proba- 
tioners for the work, and the propriety of retaining or dismissing 
them, and she may at any time terminate the connection of a pupil 
with the school in case of misconduct, inefficiency or neglect of 
duty. 

Except under special circumstances failure to pass the examina- 
tions at the end of the first year is considered a sufficient cause for 
the termination of a student's connection with the school. 

Students reside in the home and serve as assistants in the various 
departments of the Hospital for the full three years. They are ex- 
pected to perform any duty assigned to them by the Superintendent 
of Nurses. 

After the period of probation, students are required, when on 
duty, to wear the dress prescribed by the Hospital, which is blue 



74 TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

and white striped gingham, with white apron and cap and linen 
collar and cuffs. Probationers are not allowed to wear this dress. 

To the University Hospital belongs the honor of bestowing upon 
its graduates a cap that possesses a real history — the Florence Night- 
ingale cap, installed by Miss Parsons, a graduate of St. Thomas 
Hospital, London,, and the first superintendent of the University 
Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Day Nurses are on duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. with one hour 
for dinner, and three hours for rest and recreation. They are given 
an afternoon each week and part of every Sunday. Each student 
is required to devote at least one hour daily to lecture, class work 
or study. A vacation of three weeks is allowed each year. 

In sickness all students are cared for gratuitously, but the time 
so lost must be made up. 

The course of training includes practical instruction in the nurs- 
ing of medical, surgical, orthopedic, gynecological patients, ob- 
stetrics, the nursing of children, and the operating room work. 

A course of lectures is given by the physicians and surgeons of 
the University, and class instruction with demonstrations by the 
Superintendent of Nurses and her assistants. Examinations are 
held at stated periods. 

When the full term of three years is ended, the nurses thus trained 
will be at liberty to choose their own fields of labor, whether in 
hospitals, in private families, or in the various branches of social 
work which offer opportunities for the woman of ability. A diploma 
is given upon completion of course of training. 

In addition to board, lodging and a reasonable amount of laundry 
work, each student receives an allowance of $5.00 per month to 
defray the expenses of uniforms, text-books, etc., incidental to her 
training. 

Graduates, 1916 

Margaret Dunn Maryland 

Julia Irene Kauffm an Maryland 

Marion Asbury Forney North Carolina 

Marguerite Mary Walter Maryland 

Sallie Smith North Carolina 

Laura Polly Clark North Carolina 

Inez May Scarff Maryland 

Anna Spiller Hurst Virginia 

Emma Blanche Hoffmaster Maryland 

Lillie Grace Null Maryland 

Helen Bertiell McSherry Maryland 

Serena Webster Selfe Maryland 

Margaret Colin Mayo Maryland 

Bernice Violet Smith Maryland 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES <•> 

Elsie Love Rutherford Virginia 

Helen Lambib Blake Maryland 

HlLDEGARDE Hi: AMY ' 

Maui:: Estill Langenfeldt Maryland 

Nellie Eureka Dix Virginia 

Elizabeth Helen Phelan Canada 

.Mary Edna John '. Virginia 

J olia Louise Henkel Virginia 

Lucy DuLaney Scaggs Man/land 

Ltxla Kathryn Eichneb Maryland 

Maid Warinci Simmons South Carolina 



THE MERCY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

The Mercy Hospital Training School for Nurses, conducted by the 
Sisters of Mercy and connected with the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, was organized and incorporated under the general laws 
of the Stale of Maryland in 1899. Its first students were graduated 
in 1901; and on the passage of the bill for registration in 1904, the 
Sisters of Mercy, connected with the Hospital service, received 
certificates as registered nurses. 

The Training School was affiliated with the Board of Regents of 
the State of New York in 1906; and, in the same year, the Alumnae 
Association was incorporated, having been previously connected 
with the Associated Alumnae of the United States. The graduates. 
as active members, have been much interested in the movements 
of the Maryland Association of Graduate Nurses, to whom they have 
given every encouragement to uplift the profession in its many 
works of district nursing, tuberculosis campaign, Red Cross move- 
ments, etc. 

The requirements for entrance are: highest moral standing, 
intelligence, good education and health. The age limit is twenty 
to thirty-five years. 

After a three months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the Training School proper, 
receiving five dollars a month wherewith to secure uniforms, text 
books, etc., the education they receive being considered their com- 
pensation. The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause 
which may be deemed sufficient by the Sister Superior or Superin- 
tendent. 

The course of training comprises three years of theory and prac- 
tice. The clinical advantages are exceptional. The medical, 
surgical, orthopedic, gynecological, obstetrical, children's and 
dietetic departments give valuable practical experience. The nurses 



76 TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

are taught the theory of nursing by class recitations and demon- 
strations by efficient Sister instructors. Supplementing this train- 
ing is a course of lectures from the ablest professors of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine and College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, who are untiring in their efforts to keep the School abreast 
with modern scientific developments. 

Graduates, 1916 

Sister Mart Laurentine Harrington Pennsylvania 

Estelle Marie Baine. West Virginia 

May Dolores Bezold Maryland 

Genevieve Marie Biesecker Maryland 

Teresa Aileen Dougher Pennsylvania 

Rose Meehan Fields Maryland 

Marjorie Hendricks Gillilan Maryland 

Sarah Agnes Gorman Delaware 

Carrie Belle Kellican Virginia 

Margaret Geraldine McDonough Pennsylvania 

Marjorie Mary O'Mailey Maryland 

Mary Elizabeth Sappington Maryland 

Hazle Lee Schweizer Alabama 

Rose Effie Selb y Maryland 

Grace Eleanor Shepperson Pennsylvania 

Carrie Elizabeth Shoff Pennsylvania 

Wed a Jane Shoff Pennsylvania 

Lucy Seymour Spicer Maryland 

Carrie Agnes Wagman Pennsylvania 

Bertie Agnes Weber Maryland 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 
Alice E. Wheeler, R.N., Superintendent of Training School. 

The Maryland General Hospital Training School for Nurses 
has been in successful operation since 1891. 

In 1909 the Training School was registered with the Board of 
Regents of the State of New York. 

Its purpose is to give to young women desiring to understand the 
science and acquire the art of nursing the sick and injured, the 
opportunity, through instruction and training, to qualify themselves 
for efficient and skillful work in their humane and useful mission. 

A candidate for admission must be between 19 and 35 years 
of age. 

She must have a High School education or pass an examination 
in the subjects embraced in, or equivalent to, the first two years' 
curriculum of the High Schools of the State of Maryland. 

She must present a certificate from her family physician testi- 
fying as to good health and proper physical condition, and certifi- 
cates from two other responsible persons. 



ENDOWMENT FUND 77 

The first six months will constitute a period of probation, in which 
the candidate must show her fitness before she will be finally ac- 
cepted as a pupil. The school reserves the right of suspension or 
dismissal at any time, for inefficiency, misconduct, or infraction 
of the rules of discipline. 

A vacation of two weeks each year is granted. 

Pupils are cared for without expense in case of illness, provided 
they remain in the hospital and are attended by members of the 
Medical Staff. 

The full course of instruction will extend over a period of three 
calendar years. During the probationary period practical demon- 
strations are given in the class room, four hours each week. Nurses 
in training receive instruction in the nursing of medical, surgical, 
orthopedic, gynecological patients, in operating room work, and 
also in obstetrics and the nursing of children; in addition to which, 
courses of lectures are given by the visiting physicians and sur- 
geons of the Maryland General Hospital. 

All examinations must be successfully passed before the pupil 
will be advanced to the work of the following year. 

Graduates, 1916 

Daisy Buowni.vq Smith Maryland 

Sallie Mae Calloway Delaware 

Ruth Calloway Delaware 

Amelia Louise Giese Maryland 

Nellie Conway Gault Maryland 

Cora. Elizabeth Corrigan Pennsylvania 

Minnie Saphirs Cheezum Maryland 

Alice Gertrude Price Maryland 

Lillian May Barrett Maryland 

Mary Ellen Kerns Maryland 

Elizabeth Bishop Phillips Maryland 

Violet Cassandra Boteler Maryland 

Blanche Alexina Morgan Maryland 

Jane Elizabeth Sims Virginia 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the Board 
of Trustees of this Fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 

Harry Adler, M.D. B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Charles Markell, LL.B. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 



/O ENDOWMENT FUND 

University of Maryland," and is independent and self-perpetuat- 
ing, filling itself any vacancies. Its powers are limited to the ex- 
penditure of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied 
in the discretion 'of the Board for the benefit of the University. 
Contributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni 
and friends. They may be made to the general or University 
Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other department of the Uni- 
versity. If intended for the School of Medicine, they may be 
given to the general medical fund or to some special object, as build- 
ing, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, 
gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the 
"Charles Frick Research Fund," already established in memory 
of that distinguished investigator. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Charles Markell, Treasurer, 1137 Calvert Building, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 

To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 

The membership fee is SI. 00 per annum, payable in March. 

The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, and an 
orator will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old 
classmates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates 
who have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President 
Dr. X. R. Gorter 

Vice-Presidents 
Dr. C. R. Foutz, Westminster, Md. 
Dr. H. D. Fry, Washington, D. C. 
Dr. Josiah Bowex. Mt. Washington, Md. 

Recording Secretary 
Dr. M. L. Lichtenberg 

Assistant Recording Secretary 
Dr. C. W. Heffinger, Sykesville, Md. 

Treasurer 
Dr. Edw. A. Looper 

Corresponding Secretary 
Dr. J. I. Pennington 

Necrotogi* 1 
Dr. Jos. T. Smith 

Executive Committee 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll, Chairman 
Dr. B. Merrill Hopkins Dr. John Houff 
Dr. C. R. Wixterson Dr. H. M. Jones 



79 



80 ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

President 
C. W. Vogel, M.D. 

1st Vice-President 
Humphry D. Wolfe, M.D. 

2nd Vice-President 
W. C Stifler, M.D. 

Secretary 
H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

Treasurer 
C. E. Brack, M.D. 

Executive Committee 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 
H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D. A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND. 

President 
E. John W. Revell, 1308 Fidelity Building 

Vice-President 
Albert H. Carroll, The Walbert Apartment 

Treasurer 
Wm. K. Stichel, Baltimore and Light Streets 

Recording Secretary 
Frank W. Rhodes, 219 St. Paul Street 

Advisory Council 
Medical 
Dr. Chas. A. Sadler, 1415 Linden Avenue 
Dr. Arthur M. Shipley, 1827 Eutaw Place 
Dr. J. M. H. Rowland, 1204 Madison Avenue 

Legal 
Mr. James W. Bowers, 16 E. Lexington Street 
Mr. Frank V. Rhodes, 219 St. Paul Street 
Mr. J. H. Skeen, 920 Equitable Building 

Dental 

Dr. H. F. Gorgas, Charles and Centre Streets 
Dr. Merrill Hopkinson, Professional Building 
Dr. L. Wilson Davis, 331 N. Charles Street 






YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 81 

Pharmaceutical 

Dr. John B. Thomas, Baltimore and Light Streets 

Dr. John F. Hancock, 4 S. Howard Street 

Dr. Eugene W. Hodson, Baltimore and Light Streets 

Academic 

Hon. Walter I. Dawkins, 1119 Fidelity Building 
Dr. James A. Nydeger, University Club 
J. W. Iglehart, Esq. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This Association since its establishment, eighteen years ago, has steadily 
grown in numbers and influence and has met a need of College life. 

All students of any Department of the University are eligible to membership 
as actives or associates, which membership includes special privileges in the 
City Association. 

Bible and Mission Classes are maintained by the Association throughout 
the College year, and every effort is exerted to promote Christian character 
and morality. 

A committee of members will be on hand at the opening of the session in 
Davidge Hall to welcome new students to the University, and will also be 
glad to render assistance in the way of securing comfortable rooms, boarding 
houses, etc., and to extend any other courtesies possible. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited 
to share in the privileges of the Association, and, upon arriving in the city, to 
address the officers named below, who will be glad to furnish any information 
desired regarding the Association and its work, and to render any assistance 
'n their power. 

John W. Edel (Law Department), President 

M. L. Lumpkin (Medical Department), Vice-President 



♦ 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 
THE FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

John Brockway Rippere M.A., Vice-President 'Graduate of Wesleyan University), Professor 
of Latin. 

John B. White, M.A. (Graduate of Geneva College:,!, Professor of Greek and Latin. 

Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A. (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), Professor 
Mathematics. 

Adolf Schumacher, Ph.D.. (Graduate of Gottingen University, and University of Pennsylvania) 
Professor of French and German. 

Reginald H. Ridgely, B.S., M.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Biology. 

John Clifford Gray, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Harvard University), Professor of Chemistry. 

Chauncey St.C. McNeill, U. S. A., M.A., Lieutenant of the United States Army, Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics and Lecturer en International and Constitutional Law. 

Henry Francis Sturdy, B.A., M.A.. (Graduate of St. John's College, and Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity), Professor of History and Political Economy. 

Sidney S. Handy, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Columbia University), Professor of English. 

Harold Brenton Scarborough, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Draw- 
ing and Physics. 

Thomas L. Gladden, Instructor in Latin and Mathematics. 

Roscoe E. Grove, B.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Instructor in German and English. 
•Sarah Berry, Registrar and Secretary for the President. 

DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

The Regular Winter Season begins on October J of each year, and continues until the follow- 
ing May. 

The requirements for admission are the same as in all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D , Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D , D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and 

Dean of Faculty. 
Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 
J. William Smith, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

Elmer E. Cruzen, D.D.S., Professor of Crown and Bridge Work and Ceramics. 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 
Eldridge Baskin, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Orthodontia and Associate Professor ot Clinical 

Dentistry. 
Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Professor of Histology. 
J. W. Holland, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 

Robert L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 
Frank P. Haynes, D.D.S., Lecturer in Dental Anatomy 
William A. Rea, D.D.S., Chief Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
Alex. H. Paterson, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry. 
S. Whiteford Moore, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Anaesthesia and Analgesia 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
Francis J. Valentine, A.M., D.D.S., E. Fitzroy Phillips, D.D.S., Assistant Dentai Demon 

strators. 

82 






UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 83 



% DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

FORTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Dean. 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., Esq., Testamentary Law. 

Randolph Barton, Jr., Esq., Commercial Law. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Esq., Common Carriers. 

Howard Bryant, Esq., Practice in State Courts. 

W. Calvin Chesnut, Esq., Insurance. 

Ward B. Coe, Esq., Title and Conveyancing. 

William C. Coleman, Esq., Bills and Notes. 

James U. Dennis, Esq., Personal Property, Including Bailments. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., Contracts. 

Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Torts. 

Hon. James P. Gorter, Evidence and Pleading. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Domestic Relations. 

Charles McH. Howard, Esq., Equity Jurisprudence. 

Arthur L. Jackson, Esq., Conflict of Laws and International Law. 

Sylvan H. Lauchheimer, Esq., Bankruptcy and Banking Law. 

Hon. Alfred S. Niles, Constitutional Law. 

Eugene O'Dunne, Esq., Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence. 

William Lee Rawls, Esq., Corporations. 

Albert C. Ritchie, Esq., Elementary Law. 

Hon. John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Shipping Paten 

Trade-Marks and Copyrights. 
G. Ridgley Sappington, Esq., Practice Court. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., Real Property. 
Clarence A. Tucker, Esq., Equity Procedure. 
Joseph N. Ullman, Esq., Sales of Personal Property. 



. 



For catalogue containing full information, address, EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary and 
Treasurer of Law Faculty, 102-5 Law Building, Baltimore, Md. 



I 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 

MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 1841-1904. 
THE seventy-third annual session. 

FACULTY 

William Simon, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M. R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Pharmacog- 
nosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

E. Fx.ank Kelly, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacy. 

Charles C. Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Vegetable Histology. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Associate Professor of Dispensing and Commercial Pharmacy. 

Louis J. Burger, Ph.G., LL.B., Le turer on Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 

George A. Stall, Phar.D., Demonstrator in Dispensing. 

For catalogue and information, address, CHAS. CASPARI, Jr., Dean. 



INDEX 



Alumni Associations: 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 80 

University of Maryland 80 

University of Maryland Medical Depart- 
ment 79 

Annual Appointments. 45 

Board of Instruction 6 

Board of Regents 4 

Calendar 2 

Consolidation of Schools 33 

Curriculum 53 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Maryland General Hospital 24 

Mercy Hospital 23 

University Hospital 22 

Expenses, Students^ 52 

^^ Faculty of Physic..^ 5 

*. Fees 51 

Graduates 31 

^^^ J^^Iospitals: 

K Franklin Square Hospital 37 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 39 

• A Maryland General Hospital 36 
Mtafrvland Lying-in Asylum, The (Mater- 
nity 37 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, The 37 

Maternity Hospital of the University of 

f Maryland 37 

Mercy Hospital 35 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane 39 

Municipal Hospital 38 

Presbyterian Ear, Eye and Throat Charity 

Hospital, The 38 

Rosewood State Training School 40 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for 

the Insane, The 39 

South Baltimore Eye, Ear, Nose and 

Throat Charity Hospital 38 

Springfield State Hospital 40 

Spring Grove State Hospital 39 



St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 39 

University Hospital 34 

Laboratories: 

Anatomical 42 

Chemical 42 

Clinical Pathology 43 

Histology and Embryology 43 

Pathology and Bacteriology 43 

Physiology 42 

Physiological Chemistry 42 

Libraries 44 

Matriculates 26 

Museum 44 

Prizes 45 

Publications 45 

Requirements for Matriculation 45 

Rules.. 50 

Scholarships 51 

Staffs: 

City Hospital at Bayview 19 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 18 

Maryland General Hospital 16 

Maryland Lying-in Asylum (Mater nit6) . . 21 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, TL.3 21 

Mercy Hospital 12 

Nursery and Child's Hospital 20 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 21 

University Hospital 11 

Training School for Nurses: 

Maryland General Hospital 76 

Mercy Hospital 75 

University Hospital 73 

University Council 4 

University of Maryland: 
Department of Arts and Sciences (St. 

John's College) 82 

Department of Dentistry 82 

Department of Law 83 

Department of Pharmacy 83 

Young Men's Christian Association 81 



84 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 




UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 







MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL 



? 








THE WAVERLY PRESS 

BALTIMORE, U. S. A. 



VOL. II 



JULY, 1917 



NO. 2 



BULLETIN 



OF 



University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 



and 



College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1917-1918 



PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR 
FEBRUARY, APRIL, JUNE, JULY, OCTOBER AND DECEMBER 

CALVERT AND SARATOGA STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter June 1<J, 1918 at the Post Office at Baltimore, Md. 
under the Act of August 24, 1912 









n 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin, of the University of Maryland, 
Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Vol. II JULY, 1917 No. 2 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

SESSION 1917-1918 



33 



CALENDAR 



1917-18 



June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University, Mercy, and 
Maryland General Hospitals. 

September 25. — Examination of Conditioned Students and Exami- 
nation for Advanced Standing. 

October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

November 28. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

December 3. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

December 22. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

January 2. — Christmas Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

February 22. — Washington's Birthday. 

March 27. — Easter Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

April 2. — Easter Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

June 1. — Commencement. 



34 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The School of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland was established in Baltimore in 1807; The College 
of Physicians and Surgeons was established in Baltimore in 1872. 
The consolidated school offers a high grade course in medicine ex- 
tending over a period of four years, and leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Md., was founded 
in 1882, and is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral 
part of the School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of three years. 

5th. The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore, Md., was estab- 
lished in 1841 as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated 
with the School of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers 
two years, and leads to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 

35 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S. 

LL.D. I. H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S. 

Hexry D. Harlan, LL.D. Robert Moss, Esq. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D. Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. 

John C. Rose, LL.B., LL.D. William L. Rawls, Esq. 

D. M. R. Culbreth, A.M., M.D. Randolph Barton, Jr., A.B., LL.B. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., PhD., Alfred S. Niles, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 

LL D. William F. Lockwood. M.D. 

Charles Caspari Jr. Phar. D. . George W. Dobbin, A.B.. M.D. 

Daniel Base, PhD Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

Philemon H. Tuck, A.M., LL.B. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

the university council. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional, or scientific degree 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before^them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., 

President of St. John's College. 

J. B. RIPPERE, A.M., 

PHILEMON H. TUCK, A.M., LL.D., 

For St. John's College. 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M.D., 

For School of Medicine. 

HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D., 

For School of Law. 
T. O. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 

For School of Dentistry. 

CHARLES CASPARI, Jr., Phar.D., 

For School of Pharmacy. 

36 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

RANDLOPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

L. E. NEALE, M.D., LL.D. 

CHARLES W. MITCHELL, A.M., M.D. 

J. HOLMES SMITH, M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D. 

SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 

RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

WILLIAM F. LOCKWOOD, M.D. 

GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M.D., Se.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON, M.D. 

CARY B. GAMBLE, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

HIRAM WOODS, A.M., M.D. 

CHARLES E. SIMON, A.B., M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D. 

37 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Pediatrics and 
Clinical Medicine. 

J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology and 
Clinical Medicine. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Nathaniel G. Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteri- 
ology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Opthalmology and Otology. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 

Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Opthalmology and Otology. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry and 
Clinical Pathology. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery and Sur- 
gical Pathology. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 

Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

A. C. Pole, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 

J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D., Professor of Clinical Opthalmology and Otology. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 
and Pediatrics. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 

W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

38 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 39 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Professor of Hygiene. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John P. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.B., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Clinical 
Pediatrics. 

Samuel J. Fort, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., D.Sc. Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton/ A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Psychiatry. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Albert T. Chambers. M.D.. Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Emeritus Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Alfred Ullman, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatrics. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery and Associate 
Professor of Anatomy. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Anton G. Rytina. A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

H. R. Spencer, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

E. R. Strobel, A.B., M.D.^ Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 



40 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

■\ 

J. Clement Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Wm. I. Messick. M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 
and Dermatology. 

Hubert C. Knapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Abraham Samuels, Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

William W. Requardt, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Glenn M. Litsinger, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

George W. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and 
Nose. 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology. 

Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

J. R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Wm. Greenfeld, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 

C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Path- 
ologist to University Hospital. 

A., H. Carroll, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

E. F. Kelley, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

H. C. Blake, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Hobert P. Bay, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Phys- 
iological Chemistry. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

Harvey B. Stone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Anaesthesia. 

Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate in Anatomy and Histology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D., Associate in Materia Medica. 

R. C Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 41 

H. D. McCarthy, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

L. W. Ketrox, A.B., M.D., Associate in Dermatology. 

Geo. A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

H. K. Fleckexsteix, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Maurice Lazexby, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

W. Miltox Lewis, M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

F. K. Nichols, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Henry T. Collexberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 
Frank W. Hachtel, M. D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

G. F. Sargext, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 
George Murgatroyd, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 
Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

H. J. Walton, M.D., Associate in Roentgenology. 

Wm. C. Stifler, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Wm. Caspari, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Associate in Otology. 

J. McF. Berglaxd, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

B. M. Berxheim, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Blood-Vessel Surgery. 

Frank W. Keating, M.D., Lecturer on Psycho-Asthenics. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

J. T. O'Mara, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

Harry M. Robixson, M.D., Demonstrator of Dermatology. 

S. H. Street, B.S., M.D., Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Demonstrator of Orthopedic Surgery. 

J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

W. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gjmecology. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Instructor in Opthalmology and Otology. 

Ernest G. Marr, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Sam'l W. Moore, D.D.S., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

F. L. Jennings, M.D.. Instructor in Surgery. 

D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 
John Evans, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. V. Culyerhouse, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

Wm. R. Geraghty, M.D., Instructor in Anatomy. 

E. E. Mayer, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

M. H. Todd, A.B., M.D., Instructor in Clinical Medicine. 



42 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

J. M. Fenton, ^M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

J. E. Brumback, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. D. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

John S. Fenby, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

J. G. Stiefel, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

R. D. West, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology. - 

M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

A. M. Evans, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

E. Le Compte Cook, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Frank J. Powers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

J. W. V. Clift, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

Wm. B. Schapiro, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

Theodore Morrison, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

M. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Geo. F. Lynch, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

. Streett, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

Shannon, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

Habliston, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

Smith, M.D., Assistant in Operative Surgery. 
. Douthirt, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 
Skladowsky, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Surgeons. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 
Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. J. W. Holland, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. R. P. Bay, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 

Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 

John C. Hemmeter, Ph.D., M.D. Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. 

Attending Gynecologists. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. W. P. Perry, M.D. 

Attending Obstetricians. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 
Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. J. Frank Crouch, M.D. 

William Tarun, M.D. Edward A. Looper, M.D 



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UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 4.S 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Samuel K. Merrick, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Attending Orthopedic Surgeons. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologists. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Roentgenologist. 
H. J. Walton, M.D. 

RESIDENT STAFF. 

Harry M. Stein, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

Senior Surgical Service. 

D. P. Etzler, M.D. C. A. Reifschneider, M.D. 

Senior Medical Service. 

B. B. Brumbaugh, M.D. 

Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist. 

F. C. Marino, M.D. 

Junior Residents — Rotating Service, Medicine, Surgery, Gynecology, Obstetrics. 
Specialties and Laboratory. 

J. T. Daves, M.D. E. C. Reitzel, M.D. 

J. Salan, M.D. A. W. MacGregor, M.D. 

L. L. Smith, M.D. E. H. Hedrick, M.D. 

H. L. Wheeler, M.D. F. E. Armstrong, M.D. 

D. F. Bennett, M.D. J. R. Rolenson, M.D. 

Out-Door Obstetrics. 
J. G. Marston, M.D r I. B. Bronttshas, M.D. 



44 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 
SURGICAL DIVISION. 

Surgeons. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Harvey B. Stone, M.D. William W. Requardt, M.D. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D. Thos. R. Chambers, M.D. 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 

Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 

George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Proctologist. 

C. F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Urologist. 

A. G. Rytina, M.D. 



MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Associate Physicians. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D. Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. Louis J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 

Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

A ssociate Gastro-Enterologist. 

T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 45 

Pediatrists. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetrician. 
George \V. Dobbin, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Emil Novak, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Gynecologist. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists. 

Abraham Samuels, M.D. George Strauss, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologists. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Wm. Greenfeld, M.D. 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION 

Clinical Pathologist. 
Charles E. Simon, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF OTO-NEUROLOGY. 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 



46 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 
X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographer. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Assistant Radiographer. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Chairman. Secretary 

Harry Friedexwald, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
E. P. Smith, M.D., Superintendent. 

Resident Surgeons. 



Guy L. Post, M.D. 
F. X. Kearney, M.D. 
F. E. Mason, M.D. 



R. W. McKenzie, M.D. 

L. H. Bloom, M.D. 

H. D. Ketcherside, M.D. 



Resideiit Physicians. 



L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

H. Rowland Carroll, M.D. 

Charles R. Thomas, M.D. 



Hans C. Holm, M.D. 
L. H. Bloom, M.D. 
Arthur F. Peterson, M.D. 



Resident Gynecologist. 

Lemuel A. Lasher, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 

C. C. Nohe, M.D. 

Accident Service. 

Thomas K. Galvin, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 47 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF. 
VISITING STAFF. 

John D. Blake, M.D. Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. 

Associates. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D. A. G. Barrett, M.D. 

H. C. Blake, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D 

J. B. Culverhouse, M.D. 

Physicians. 

E. B. Freeman, M.D. Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Jno. C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. J. M. Craighill, M.D. 
Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. Thomas W. Keown, A.B., M.D. 

Frank J. Powers, M.D. J. W. Clift, M.D. 

Neurologists. 
Chas. G. Hill,-A.M., M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Associates. 
J. Clement Clark, M.D. J. Percy Wade, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 
S. K. Merrick, M.D. John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. 

Obstetricians. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. 

Associates. 

J. K. B. Seegar, M.D. Stanley H. Gorsuch, M.D. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 
W. B. Perry, M.D. J. Mason Hundley, M.D 

Associates. 
S. H. Streett, B.S., M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D. E. H. Hayward, M.D. 



48 MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 

Ophthalmologists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

Associates. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. R. D. West, M.D 

Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D 

Associate. 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 

Radiologist. 
John Evans, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Stroebel, A.B., M.D. 

Urologist. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D 

Pathologists. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McGleary, M.D. 

G. Howard White, M.D. H. B. Wylie, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 

Joseph J. Roberts, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

George A. Bawdex, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Robert W. Johxsox, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Bowers H. Grout, M.D., Resident Gynecologist. 

C Chapin Childs, M.D., Resident Surgeon for Proctology, Laryngology arid 

Urology. 

B. M. Jaffe, M.D., Resident Physician. 

Fraxk Machin, Resident Obstetrician. 

Assistant Resident Physicians Rotating Service. 

Roy A. Wolford, M.D. John G. Skillixg, M.D. 

Churchill Worrell, M.D. Fred. H. Clark, M.D. 



KHRNAN HOSPITAL STAFF 49 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

COMPTON RlELY, M.D. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Dispensary Surgeon and Anaesthetist. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant Surgeon and Superintendent. 

George F. Lynch, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman, Instructor in Corrective Gymnastics. 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Ada Mosby, Kindergartner and Industrial Teacher. 

Roentgenologist. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

.4 ttending Plastic Surgeon. 
John Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atkinson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Richard H. Johnston, M.D. 

.4 ttending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake. M.D. 



•")() liAYVIEW HOSPITAL STAFF 

Attending Oculist and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentist. 
G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

W. S. Halsted, A.B., LL.D., B.Sc, M.D. J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. 

William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 
John N. MacKenzie, A.B.. M.D. 



STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITAL AT BAYV1EW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

AdmOnt Clark, M.D., Pathologist. 

Thomas P. Sprunt, M.D., Acting Physician-in-Chief. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Acting Surgeon-in-Chief. 



CONSULTING STAFF. 

Ophthalmologist. 
James J. Mills. M.D. 



NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL STAFF 51 

Otologist. 

William Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 

Edward H. Richardson, M.D. Eugh W. Brent, M.D. 

Urologists. 
Gideon M. Timberlake, M.D. John T. Geraghty, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henry M. Thomas, M.D. 



ST. ELIZABETH HOME. 

Attending Physician. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Surgeon. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
A. C. Gillis, M.D. 



STAFF OF NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL. 

Attending Physicians. 
Chas. F. Bevan, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Wm. S. Baer, M.D. Wm. F. Lockwood, M.D. 

Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Oculist and Aurist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Superintendent. 
Miss Elizabeth M. Stone. 



52 MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL STAFF 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O'Donovan A.M., M.D. Eugene H. Hayward, M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

J. F. Powers, M.D. L. C. M. Parker, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

R. B. Warfield, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde E. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Proctologist. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Pathologists. 
Sydney M. Conk, A.M., M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
James P. Rosseau 



MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM (MATERNITE) 

Visiting Obstetricians. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Carl C. Nohe, M.D. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

Obstetricians. 
.1. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Nbalb, M.D. 

Associates. 
.J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, M.D. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Frank H. Machin, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 53 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 
John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Medicine. 

H. D. McCarty, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
S. R. Clarke, M.D. M. S. Schimmel, M.D. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D. E. L. Cook, M.D. 

Eugene Kerr, M.D. Horace Byers, M.D. 

Surgery. 

R. P. Bay, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Frank S. Lynn. M.D., Associate Chief, of Clinic. 
T. L. Phillips, M.D. Charles R. Edwards, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. H. M. Foster, M.D. 

Children. 

Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. C L. Joslin, M.D. 

Norbert C. Nitsch, A.B., M.D. J. S. Fenby, M.D. 

Women. 

W. K. White, M.D. R, G. Willse, M.D. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D. L. H. Douglas, M.D. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. D. Silberman, M.D. 

Eye and Ear. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
E. A. Looper, M.D. H. Butler, M.D. 

G. MURGATROYD, M.D. 

Skin. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
L. N. Ketron, A.B., M.D., H. M. Robinson, M.D. 

Stomach. 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D. E. G. Bukeding, M.D. 

Orthopedics. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. 



54 



MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 



Genito-Urinary. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D., Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 
A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
W. H. Councill, M.D. Wm. Blaney, M.D.* 

Neurology. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

B. Pushkin, M.D. J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. 

Rectal. 

G. Milton Linthicum, Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 
J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Tuberculosis. 
J. E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Obstetrics. 

L. H. Douglas, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

X-ray Department. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenologist. 

Miss Frances Meredith, Chief Nurse, Out-Patient Department. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Physician in Charge. 
B. S. Hanna, M.D. 

Surgery. 



E. H. Hutchins, M.D. 
A. M. Evans, M.D. 



Wm. J. Todd, M.D. 

A. L. Tumbleson, M.D. 



A. F. Hutchins, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. 
Anton G. Rytina, M.D. 



H. M. Foster, M.D. 
F. L. Jennings, M.D. 



A. E. Goldstein, M.D. 
Harris Goldman, M.D. 



Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



Medicine. 



Harvey G. Beck, M.D. . 
B. S. Hanna, M.D. 



W. C. Cofpage, M.D. 
A. C. Sorenson, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 55 

Diseases of Stomach. 

Julius Friedenwald, M.D. John G. Stiefel, M.D. 

T. Fred'k Leitz, M.D. Theodore Morrison, M.D. 

L. Krause, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases. 

A. C. Gillis, M.D. D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D. G. B. Wolfe, M.D. 

Otto H. Duker, M.D. J. W. V. Clift, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 

C. L. Joslin, M.D. 

F. N. Hillis, M.D. Frank Ayd, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 
A. Samuels, M.D. J. G. Onnen, M.D. 

Emil Novak, M.D. C. F. J. Coughlin, M.D. 

A. J. Gillis, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

G. W. Mitchell, M.D. W. F. Zinn, M.D 

Diseases of Eye and Ear. 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

H. K. Fleckensteix, M.D. Jos. I. Kemler, M.D. 

N euro-Otology. 
J. VV. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Diseases of the Rectum. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 

Diseases of Skin. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. B. V. Kelly, M.D 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

Committee in Charge. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Chairman. 
Maurice Lazenby, M.D. Arthur G. Barrett, M.D. 

Medicine and Children. 

J. W. V. Clift, M.D. S. D. Shannon, M.D. 

Frank J. Powers, M.D. 



56 MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DI8PENSARY STAFF 

Surgery. 



Arthur G. Barrett, M.D. 



J. C. Frey, M.D 



Nose and Throat. 
George W. Murgatroyd, M.D. 



Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. 



Eye and Ear. 



J. E. Brumback. M.D. 



J. D. BUBERT, MI) 

Wm. Caspari, M.D 
Reginald D. West, M.D 



G astro-Enter ology and Proctology. 
E. B. Freeman, M.D. Ernest G. Marr, M.D 

Urology. 



R. B. Kenyon, M.D. 



J. B. Culverhouse, M.D 



Gynecology . 
Maurice Lazenby, M.D. J. M. Fenton, M.D 

J. M. Denny, M.D 

Obstetrics. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, M.D 

Eugene H. K. Zeller, M.D. 

Dermatology. 
E. R. Strobel, M.D 

Neurology. 



Irving C. Spear, M.D. 
A. C. Gillis, M.D. 



George M. Settle, M.D. 
M. Feldmax, M.D. 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 

PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

1916-1917. 



POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Name State 

Philip B. Becker New York 

* Arthur E. S. Casey Connecticut 

* George Edward Clark, M.D New York 

Alfredo Comas Calero Cuba 

Michael Joseph Czapp Pennsylvania 

•John M. DeWeese, A.B., M.D Ohio 

* George L. Faucett, B.S., M.D Alabama 

* William James Fulton Maryland 

* Benjamin Harrison Gibson, M.D — Georgia 

* Manuel Gonzalez Porto Rico 

* F. M. Gordy, M.D Georgia 

* Thomas Arthur Griffin, ^[..T>. North Carolina 
' Francis E. Henry, M.D., Pennsylvania 

* Horace L. Hulett, M.D New York 

* Leo Huth, M.D Ohio 

* Donald Swett Knowlton Maine 

*F. Lahmers, M.D Ohio 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name State 

* Royce Reed Long, A.B Maryland 

* Carlos E. Rivas Leiva Cub a 

* L. J. McCusker .Massachusetts 

* Alfredo D. Martinez Porto Rico 

* Edward William Mulligan Rhode Island 

Keiki Nagatsuka Japan 

* Hugh W. Neel, M.D West Virginia 

* W. T. Owens, M.D West Virginia 

J. A. Parlade, Phar.D Cuba 

* Davis Robertson North Carolina 

Pedro Rosario, Jr Porto Rico 

* Fred Collins Sabin New York 

* C. N. Slater, M.D West Virginia 

* J. E. Springer, M.D Ohio 

George W. Todd, Jr Maryland 

S. J. Wu, Phar.D China 

33 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Andrew, Clarence P., A.B South Africa 

Armstrong. Fred Francis Connecticut 

Audet, Ch \ rles Henry Massachusetts 

Baldwin, Jr., Anton Manjland 

Bampfield, Fred J Canada 

Barishaw, Samuel New Jersey 

Bennet, DaCosta F., A.B Maine 

Bloom, George Homer Pennsylvania 

Bloom, Lawrence Hughes Pennsylvania 

Bohl, Louis Joseph Neiv Jersey 

Bonner, Octavius B North Carolina 

Bronnshas, Ipolitas B New York 

Burrows, Ernest Allen Massachusetts 

Byrnes, Thomas Eusebius Massachusetts 

Carlin, Edward J Neiv Jersey 

Carroll, Harry Roland Maryland 

Champlin, Roy D New York 

Clark, Frederick Harlow Georgia 

Collins Henry J Massachusetts 

Covey, William Crocket West Virginia 

Cumin, Milton H Maryland 

Daves, John Thomas Virginia 



Name State 

Davidson, William Brown Rhode Island 

Donahue, Cornelius Louis New York 

Doyle, Joseph F Neiv Hampshire 

Duffy, Vincent P West Virginia 

Eby, John Cyril, Phar.D Maryland 

Ehlers, Reginald G.M., M.D. Y... California 

Eisenberg, Albert Maryland 

Eleder, Franklin Charles Marxjland 

Fat, Daniel E., Phar.D Maryland 

Fernandez, Luis J Porto Rico 

Frost, Nugent George Massachusetts 

Gallagher, William Edward New York 

Gieson, John Jacob, A.B Virginia 

Hartman, George Otto Ohio 

Hedrick, Erland H West Virginia 

Hertzog, Francis Carl Pennsylrariia 

Holm, H. C, M.S; Ph.B. District of Columbia 

Holmes, James Massachusetts 

Howell, James Edward, B.S. North Carolina 

Huff, Wheeler O Maryland 

Kaufman, Edgar Wayne Pennsylvania 

Ketcherside, Hif.ARY D Arizona 



57 



58 



MATRICULATES 1916-1917 



Name State 

* Kimball, Philip Albert New Hampshire 

Kirk, WILLIAM Van West Virginia 

Koprivich, Milan I. S Serbia 

Krause, Lor is A .M Maryland 

Lasher, Lemuel A Pennsylvania 

Legge, Kenneth D District of Columbia 

MacGregor, Allan YV Connecticut 

McClintock, George Lorenze Maryland 

Machin, Frank H Maryland 

Maddison, Walter E Utah 

Marston, James Graham, A.B Maryland 

Martin, John Willis Maryland 

Martinez, Jose Porto Rico 

Mason, Frank Ebaugh Maryland 

• Merrick, Frank X New York 

Michael, M. Harlan Maryland 

Miller, Wilfred Porter, M.E New York 

Montgomery, Mathison J Pennsylvania 

Moran, Arthur B Connecticxit 

Moyers, Emmet D West Virginia 

None, Carl Clyde West Virginia 

Nolan, Francis F Virginia 

Norris, J. Edward Maryland 

Ogden, Frank Nevin Maryland 

Pay aw all, Juan L., A. 13.. Philippine Islands 

Peeler, Casper Smith, B.S Florida 

Peery, Clarence Eugene Virginia 

Petrulias, George A Greece 

Porterfield, Marvin H West Virginia 

Reddig, Clarence M., Ph.B.. .Pennsylvania 



Name State 

Reitzel, Elbert Coy North Carolina 

Rigau, Gabriel Porto Rico 

Rigby, Samuel B., A.B Utah 

Rodriguez, Antonio Porto Rico 

Salan, Joseph Indiana 

Shinn, Herbert L District of Columbia 

Silverstein, M ax New Jersey 

Skilling, John Galen Maryland 

Smith, Lero y Henry Maine 

Smith, Leo L Oklahoma 

Stein, Albert Massachusetts 

Tarkington, Grayson E Arkansas 

Thomas. Charles Roberts, A.B.. .Maryland 

Thomas, Kelly Clifton North Carolina 

Tierney Edward Francis Rhode Island 

Vaughan, George W Maryland 

VtBWIG, Max William, Vn.G... West Virginia 

Weber, John J., A.B Maryland 

Welch, Robert S. G Maryland 

Wheaton, Harry W New York 

Wheeler, Howard Laurence Maryland 

Whistler, Edward L., A.B Pennsylvania 

White, George Lawrence Maryland 

Williams, William C North Carolina 

Wolff, Carl Otto, A.B North Carolina 

Wolford, Roy Azariah West Virginia 

Worrell, Churchhill F Virginia 

Yost, Fielding, E. L West Virginia 

102 



• Not in attendance the entire session. 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Allen, Eustace Andrew, A.B Alabama 

Anderson, Lang W South Carolina 

Bird, La Rue Pennsylvania 

*Bonner, John Bryan North Carolina 

Borror, William Bruce West Virginia 

Briscoe, Everard Maryland 

P ross, Samuel I Maryland 

T'afritz, Edward A District of Columbia 

Clark, Harold Chandler, Ph.G. New York 

Cooke, Grady Carlyle North Carolina 

Coombs, Forrest P., B.S West Virginia 

Coilox, Frank N New Hampshire 

Dalton, William Bennett. . .North Carolina 

Darby, YV. Arthur Maryland 

Deliz, Ramon C Porto Rico 

Diedolder, Oscar A Maryland 

Fphrum, Myer Maryland 

Fazevraker, Anderson J Maryland 

Flippin, Eugene I.ittle.john..Yo»7A Carolina 

Forbes Sherman Balch Florida 

Frizzei le, John Lloyd North Carolina 

Gavronbky, Samuel New Jersey 



Nami 



State 



Gore, Michael Alvord, A.B Maryland 

Grove, George Hedges Maryland 

Hart, Crawford Avery, A.B. North Carolina 

Heiskell, Edgar Frank West Virginia 

Hunter, Dewitt T North Carolina 

Johnson, Harley Monroe. . .South Carolina 

Joyner, James Craig North Carolina 

Keli.am, John YVise Virginia 

Kocevar, Martin Francis Pennsylvania 

LaRue, Raymond T Ohio 

Lynch, Raymond A West Virginia 

McDade, Brodie Banks North Carolina 

McDowell, John S New York 

Macke, Clarence Edgar Maryland 

Miller, Daniel Maryland 

Morgan, Zachariah Raphael Maryland 

Pinkerton, Frank Coulson Maryland 

Putterman, Morris Nathan Maryland 

Reynolds, Paul Emerson Maryland 

Ridgely, Irwin Oliver, A.B Maryland 

Robles, Charles YV alter Florida 

Rousseau, James Parks North Carolina 



MATRICULATES 1916-1917 



59 



Name State 

Sabiston, Frank North Carolina 

Seal, Gratta Earle West Virginia 

Shaffer, Stewart S Pennsylvania 

Shaver, William T North Carolina 

• Shatt, Louis Maryland 

Sindler, Joseph Maryland 

Sledge, Robert F., B.S North Carolina 

Speake, Thomas Carlyle, A.B Maryland 

Spoon, Jr., Samuel C North Carolina 

* Not in attendance the entire 9eesion. 



Name StaU 

Sweet, Alfred Norton Connecticut 

Taylor, Joseph Russell Pennsylvania 

Thompson, Theodore F New Jersey 

Thorxer, John George West Virginia 

Trippett, Jr., Lemuel H., A.B. .West Virginia 

Walter, Ralph Somers Pennsylvania 

Warlick, Jr., Henry C Mississippi 

White, S. Howard, A.B South Carolina 

61 



SECOND YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Abbott, Lyman S xclair Missouri 

Adams, Edgar I aul Maryland 

Alagia, Damian Paul Maryland 

Alexis, Joseph A Pennsylvania 

Barker, Frank Talmage Florida 

Beachley. Ralph Gregory Maryland 

Boone, Jr., Walter South Carolina 

Brown, Jr., James North Carolina 

Buchness, John Adam Maryland 

Campbell, Arthur Thomas Connecticut 

Chesebro, Charles C New York 

' Cohn, Alexander Maryland 

' Conrad, Lewis S New York 

Cregg, Herbert Alexander. .Massachusetts 
Davis, Chas. Willson, A.B.. .North Carolina 

Davis, John Edward Virginia 

Deakyne, Walter Clifton Delaxrare 

Dye, Frank Gangs New York 

Flaherty, John Joseph Connecticut 

Fort, Wetherbee Maryland 

Franceschi, Francisco Porto Rico 

Geyer, William Glenn Maryland 

Goldsborough, Charles R., A.B.. Maryland 
Hartenstein, Albert G., Ph.G .WestVirginia 
Helsabeck, Chester Joseph. North Carolina 

Horine, Cyrus Flook Maryland 

Ingram, W. Hawkins Maryland 

Isaacs, Raphael Harris Maryland 

• Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name State 

Jacobowitz, Aaron Pennsylvania 

John, Baxter Schooley Virginia 

Lonergan, Paul B Pennsylvania 

Lumpkin, Morgan LeRoy, Ph. B.. .Maryland 

McElwain, Howard Byer Pennsylvania 

McLeod, Walter Guy North Carolina 

Macis, Salvador A., A.B Nicaragua 

Mallett, Victor Joseph New York 

Mayoral, Jr., Joaquin Cuba 

Morales, Jr., Pablo Porto Rico 

Murphy, Benjamin Russell New Jersey 

Neidermyer, John William... West Virginia 
Owens, William Duncan Georgia 

* Pilson, Robert A West Virginia 

* Quintero, Ernesto Porto Rico 

Reynolds, Roy Rex Virginia 

Romine, Carl Chester West Virginia 

Shaw, W. McLaurin, A.B . . .South Carolina 

Stansbury, Fred West Virginia 

Stewart, Charles Wilbur Maryland 

Tiemeyer, Arthur Charles Maryland 

Timko, Louis M Ohio 

Tull, Myron G., A.B Maryland 

Vasqttez, Raphael S Porto Rico 

White, Thomas Francis Delaware 

Whitted, Walter Puryear. ..North Carolina 

Wild, Albert Connecticut 

Wright, Harold Edson New York 

56 



FIRST YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Aptigiani, Philibert, Phar.D Maryland 

Aubrey, John Forsyth Maryland 

Banvard, Navy F. X New Jersey 

Barry, Edward Leo Rhode Island 

Bernabe Adolfo Porto Rico 

Billingslea, Charles Levine Maryland 

Bolewicki, Peter Edward, A.B. .Maryland 

Broadrup, Earl Edgar Maryland 

Broll, Harry R Maryland 

Brumback, Lynn Hamilton Virginia 



Name State 

Bubert, Howard M Maryland 

Burton, Claud Carter, B.S Kentucky 

Cardona, de, Nestor Bernardo, Porto Rico 
Castro, Andres Gutierrez, A. B., Costa ■ 
Clarken, Joseph A New Jersey 

* Conniff, John J West Virginia 

* Davis, Charles L West Virginia 

Dobihal, Louis Charles Maryland 

Doctor, Rattansha M India 

Erwin, John Joseph West Virginia 



60 



MATRICULATES 1916-1917 



Name State 

Fahndrich, Carl Gustav Maryland 

Finney, Roy Pklham Virginia 

Fleck, Roland F Pennsylvania 

Ginsburg, Leon Maryland 

Gleason, Joseph Henry Massachusetts 

Gonzalvo, F. A., A. B.. ..Dominican Republic 

Holden, F. Allan Maryland 

Hooper, Zebulon Vance North Carolina 

Hutnick, Stephen Pennsylvania 

Jackvony, Albert H., Phar.D., Rhode Island 
Janer, Angel Porto Rico 

* Jones, Bennie R., B.S., D.D.S. . ..Maryland 

Kane, Leo Vincent, A.B New Jersey 

Kaufman, Edward Leo West Virginia 

* Kelly, Harold E Virginia 

Kenure, James Thomas, B.S Connecticut 

Kinney, James P. New York 

Knotts, Earl Paul, B.S Maryland 

Kourey, Salem William Iowa 

* Kramer, John E , Maryland 

Lombard, Nicholas T., Phar.D. . .Maryland 

Lueders, Jr., William Maryland 

McGill, Waldo Knox, A.B.. .South Carolina 
Marshall, Charles Benton .. West Virginia 

Martin, William Francis North Carolina 

Matthews, Stanley William, North Carolina 

Meadows, Stanley Joseph Maryland 

Medairy, George Curtis Maryland 

Medcalf, John William Ohio 

* Mercier, Albin Scott, A.B Maryland 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name State 

Morris, Byron McNeely Pennsylvania 

Navarro, Armando Silva Porto Rico 

Pacienzo, Frank Anthony' Maryland 

Perry, Clayton Charles Pennsylvania 

Pessagno, Daniel J., A.B Maryland 

Picker, Adolph Germany 

Ponte, Jr., Joseph Perry Massachusetts 

Pugh, James Clyde Ohio 

Quevedo, de, Rafael Garcia Porto Rico 

QriNONES, Norberto A Porto Rico 

Reddington, Lawrence Joseph.. .Marylaiid 

Reese, John G. M Maryland 

Richardson, Ray W Maryland 

Rigney, Jr., Lawrence JosEPn. . . .Delaware 

Schoenheit, Edward W North Carolina 

Sheppard, H., Jr., North Carolina 

Skaggs, James William West Virginia 

Smith, Frederick Bruce Maryland 

Stein, Nathan New York 

Tolson, Jr., Howard Lee Maryland 

Ward, Edwin J Maryland 

Warren, John Freeman New York 

Wells, George Edward West Virginia 

' Willinger. Lawrence J Maryland 

Wilson, Harold Lee, A.B Delaware 

Wisrig, George Leroy Maryland 

' Woodhill, Rmllin Y Oklahoma 

Woodruff, Julian Smith North Carolina 

Zinbehg, Israel Saul Maryland 

79 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1916-17. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 194 

Department of Medicine 331 

Department of Law 425 

Department of Dentistry 207 

Department of Pharmacy 9.5 

Training Schools for Nurses 228 



Total 



1480 



GRADUATES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE 

OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

JUNE 1, 1917. 



Name State 

Armstrong, Fred Francis Connecticut 

Audet, Charles Henry Massachusetts 

Bampfield, Fred J Canada 

Barishaw, Samuel. New Jersey 

Bennet, DaCosta F Maine 

Bloom, George Homer Pennsylvania 

Bloom, Lawrence Hughes Pennsylvania 

Bohl, Louis Joseph New Jersey 

Bonner, Octavius B North Carolina 

Brounshas, Ipolitas B New York 

Burrows, Ernest Allen Massachusetts 

Ca rroll, Henry Roland Maryla nd 

Champlin, Roy D New York 

Clark Frederick Harlow Georgia 

Collins, Henry J Massachusetts 

Covey, William Crocket West Virginia 

Cumin, Milton H Maryland 

Daves, John Thomas Virginia 

Davidson, William Brown Rhode Island 

Doyle, Joseph F New Hampshire 

Duffy, Vincent P West Virginia 

Ehlers, Reginald G. M California 

Eisenberg, Albert Maryland 

Eleder, Franklin Charles Maryland 

Fay, Daniel E Maryland 

Fernandez, Luis J Porto Rico 

Gallagher, William Edward. New York 

Hartman, George Otto Ohio 

Hedrick, Erland H West Virginia 

Hertzog, Francis Cari Pennsylvania 

Holm, Hans Christian Denmark 

Holmes, James Massachusetts 

Huff, Wheeler O Maryland 

Kaufman, Edgar Wayne Pennsylvania 

Ketcherside, Hilary D Arizona 

Kirk, William Van West Virginia 

Krause, Louis A.M Maryland 

Lasher, Lemuel A Pennsylvania 

Legge, Kenneth D District of Columbia 

MacGregor, Allan W Connecticut 

McClintock, George Lorenze Maryland 



Name Slate 

Machin, Frank H Maryland 

Marston, James Graham Maryland 

Martinez, Jose Porto Rico 

Mason, Frank Eb augh Maryland 

Miller, Wilfred Porter New York 

Montgomery, Mathison J Pennsylvania 

Moran, Arthur B Connecticut 

Moyers, Emmett D West Virginia 

Nohe, Carl Clyde West Virginia 

Nolan, Francis F Virginia 

Norris, J. Edward Maryland 

Ogden, Frank Nevin Maryland 

Pa yawall, Juan L Philippine Isla?ids 

Peeler, Casper Smith Florida 

Petrulias, George A Greece 

Porterfield, Marvin H West Virginia 

Reddig, Clarence Mansfield. . .Pennsylvania 

Reitzel, Elbert Coy North Carolina 

Rigau, Gabriel Porto Rico 

Rigby, Samuel B Utah 

Rodriguez, Antonio Porto Rico 

Salan, Joseph Indiana 

Shinn, Herbert L District of Columbia 

Silverstein, Max New Jersey 

Skilling, John Galen Maryland 

Smith, Leroy Henry Maine 

Smith, Leo L Oklahoma 

Steine, Albert Massachusetts 

Tarkington, Grayson E Arkansas 

Thomas, Charles Roberts Maryland 

Vaughan, George W Maryland 

Viewig, Max William West Virginia 

Weber, John J Maryland 

Welch, Robert S. G Maryland 

Wheeler, Howard Laurence .Maryland 

Whistler, Edward L Pennsylvania 

White, George Lawrence Maryland 

Williams, William C North Carolina 

Wolff, Carl Otto North Carolina 

Wolford, Roy Azariah West Virginia 

Worrell, Churchill F Virginia 



PRIZEMEN 

University Prize — Gold Medal Louis A. M. Krause 

Certificates of Honor 

Edgar Wayne Kaufman Frank Nevin Ogden 

Luis J. Fernandez Carl Otto Wolff 

Franklin Charles Eleder 
61 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

UNITED IN 1915, AND HEREAFTER THE TWO SCHOOLS 
WILL BE CONDUCTED AS ONE. 

As a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institutions, 
and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, the entire equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United States, 
(t was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 
the College was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other 
colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law and of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four colleges thus united were "constituted an University 
by the name and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading medi- 
cal college, especially prominent in the South and widely known 
and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted 
to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867) and of 
Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 

62 



CLINICAL FACILITIES G3 

hospital, and in this hospital intra mural residency for the senior 
student, now available for the whole class, was first established. 

In 1913 juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of 32 3 r ears growth. By this association 
the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, 
equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated under 
the Legislative enactment in 1872 and established on Hanover 
Street in a building afterwards known as the Maternity, the first 
obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence 
since 1827, and the College was removed to its present location 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement, medical 
control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, 
and on this foundation in 1899 the present admirable college build- 
ing was erected. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the L'niversity of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in ac- 
commodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new and 
modem hospital of fully double the capacity of the former building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 



64 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty , 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as a marine hospital for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institution 
give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga streets, then owned by the Wash- 
ington University, in 1875. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 65 

growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the 
Sisters of Mercy with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the corner stone of the 
present Hospital. This building was completed and occupied late 
in 1889. Since then the growing demands for more space has com- 
pelled the erection of additions until now there are accommodations 
for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 700,000 
inhabitants and is under the exclusive medical control of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. It adjoins the College building and 
all surgical patients from the public wards are operated upon in the 
College operating rooms. This union of the Hospital and College 
buildings greatly facilitates the clinical teaching as there is no time 
lost in passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Railways and Electric 
Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and its branches. 

During the calendar year of 1916 there were treated in the wards 
of the Hospital 6,073 patients. That the emergency service is very 
large is shown by the fact that during this time 5,810 ambulant 
cases were treated in the accident department. In other out-patient 
departments there were treated 9,533 patients, making a total of 
21,416 ill or injured people who applied for treatment during one year. 

THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The Maryland General Hospital situated at Madison Street and 
Linden Avenue has a capacity of 185 beds and furnishes a large 
amount of clinical material which is under the control of the Faculty 
of Physic for teaching purposes. 

A new operating suite has just been completed, modern in every 
particular and adapted to the teaching of small sections of students. 
There is also a clinical amphitheatre for larger classes of students, 
in close proximity to the wards. The hospital treated during the last 
calendar year 2,692 patients in the ward and 8,549 outdoor patients. 
Seventeen hundred and thirty-two surgical operations were performed. 

The hospital receives appropriations from the State of Maryland 
and the City of Baltimore for the support of charity cases. 



66 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

FRANKLIN SQUARE HOSPITAL. 

The Franklin Square Hospital has a capacity of 100 beds. Dur- 
ing the year ending December 31, 1916, 2575 cases were treated in 
the hospital, and 1834 patients were treated in the dispensary. 
Eight hundred and fifty surgical operations were performed in the 
hospital. 

LYING-IN HOSPITALS. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic, and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternity Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before, while the large increase in clinical material has made it 
possible to offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material which is under the control 
of the Faculty of Physic. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM. 

This hospital was established by the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1874. It is the pioneer institution of its land in the 
State of Maryland and one of the first in the country. 

THE WEST END MATERNITY. 

The West End Maternity adjoins the Franklin Square Hospital 
and furnishes an abundance of clinical material, which is under the 
control of the Faculty of Physic. 

OUT-PATIENT CLINIC AND DISPENSARY. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door obstetri- 
cal clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful prenatal 
supervision, is attended during labor by a graduate physician and 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 67 

graduate nurse — one senior student also being present — and is 
visited during the puerperium by the attending student and gradu- 
ate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal records are kept, 
making this work of extreme value to the medical student, not only 
from the obstetrical standpoint, but in making him appreciate the 
value of social service and public health work. 

NUMBER OF PATIENTS. 

During the year ending December 31, 1916, the number of pa- 
tients treated in the Lying-in hospitals connected with the School 
was as follows: 

Number of Confinements in Hospitals 1133 

Number of Confinements, Out-Patient Department 1171 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class. 46 

THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS— BAY VIEW. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely 
increased by the liberal decision of the Board cf Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily 
visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the hos- 
pitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in 
amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medi- 
cal teaching. 

The Municipal Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 1G0 beds. 

The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution was founded in 1877, through the efforts of 
late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the Eye and 
Ear in the University of Maryland. It is one of the largest special 
hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1916 there were admitted to the Dispensary 
and Hospital, 10,272 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 



68 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

Professor Woods and Dr. Looper are members of the staff, and 
the clinics are at all times open to the students of the University 
of Maryland. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
every modern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as 
well as a most beautiful park-like environment and farm, and is 
closely affiliated with the University of Maryland. 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland 
by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school 
to present to its students liberal opportunities for the study of dis- 
eases of infants and children. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE AND FEEBLE 

MINDED. 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for the Insane 
This institution is one of the most modern hospitals for the treatment 
and care of the insane in this country. It is well endowed and its super- 
intendent is Dr. Edward N. Brush, Professor of Psychiatry at the 
University of Maryland. In this hospital intensive treatment 
and study of mental diseases is carried on; a large number of the 
patients entering voluntarily. The students under the direction 
of Dr. Brush and his assistants in a series of clinics are shown the 
early manifestations and the various stages of mental diseases, 
the methods of treatment, and their effects. 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane. This hospital contains 
an average of 1000 patients and is attended by Dr. Chas. G. Hill, 
Professor of Psychiatry of this faculty. Under the direction of 
Dr. Hill and his assistants the students are given opportunity for 
the study of large groups of patients showing all phases of 
various mental and nervous disorders. 



DISPENSARIES 69 

Spring Grove State Hospital. This hospital, a state institu- 
tion for the treatment of the insane, has a capacity of 780 beds. 
Dr. J. Percy Wade, associate in Psychiatry, is the superintendent. 
Students of this school are given a limited number of clinics at 
this institution. 

Springfield State Hospital. This large state institution for 
treatment of mental diseases is situated at Sykesville, Md. Dr. 
J. Clement Clark, Associate Professor of Psychiatry is its superintend- 
ent. There are accommodations for 1400 patients. At this in- 
stitution under charge of a capable director is located a modern 
psychopathic ward where intensive study of the various mental 
diseases is carried on. Each session the students of this school are 
given several clinics by Dr. Clark and his assistants. 

Rosewood State Training School. This hospital situated 
n the suburbs of Baltimore is owned and controlled by the State 
of Maryland. It contains 700 beds devoted to the treatment and 
training of the feeble minded and epileptics. Dr. Frank W. Keat- 
ing is the superintendent and is Instructor in Psycho-Asthenics 
in the University of Maryland. Sections of the Fourth Year class 
are sent to this hospital for instruction in the proper care of feeble 
minded and epileptics. 

DISPENSARIES. 

The three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital, 
Mercy Hospital and the Maryland General Hospital are organized 
upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may be the same in 
all. Each dispensary has the following departments: Medicine, 
Surgery, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, 
Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Derma- 
tology, Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special departments 
one hour each day. 

Some idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching 
is shown by the number of patients treated. For the year 1916 
over sixty thousand visits were made to the dispensaries. 

In addition to these the Dental Department, situated upon the 
grounds of the University, conducts a daily clinic which is open 
to medical students. 



University Hospital Dispensary Report, January 1st to December Slst, 
John Houff, M.D., Dispensary Physician 



1916. 



DEPARTMENT 



Surgical 

Medical 

Nervous Diseases. . 

Genito-Urinary 

Eye and Ear 

Women 

Children 

Skin 

Throat and Nose . . . 

Stomach 

Tubercular 

Orthopedic 

Obstetrical 

Diseases of Rectum 



NEW CASES 



,478 
,071 
331 
535 
976 
656 
574 
408 
543 
283 
392 
129 
400 



7,824 



3,204 

2,119 

2,142 

1,448 

2,821 

943 

737 

757 

617 

394 

570 

635 

461 

93 



16,941 



4,682 

3,190 

2,473 

1,983 

3,797 

1,599 

1,311 

1,165 

1.160 

677 

962 

764 

861 

141 



24,765 



Mercy Hospital Dispensary Report, January 1st, to December Slst, 1916. 
B. S. Hanna, M.D., Resident Physician 



DEPARTMENT 



Surgery. . ._ 

Genito-Urinary. . 

Stomach 

Nose and Throat. 

Skin 

Gynecology 

Neurology 

General Medicine 

Children 

Eye and Ear 

Orthopedics 



NEW CASES 



1,275 

1,088 

806 

652 

501 

772 

710 

1,438 

942 

707 

93 



,984 



OLD CASES 



3,178 
3,702 
1,798 
1,492 
1,164 
1,617 
1,872 
3,293 
1,728 
1,666 
73 



21,583 



4,453 
4,790 
2,604 
2,144 
1,665 
2,389 
2,5S2 
4,731 
2,670 
2,373 
166 



30,576 



Maryland General Hospital Dispensary Report, March 1, 1916 to 
1917. Emma N. Belbot, Ph.G., Registrar 


February IS, 


DEPARTMENT 


NEW CASES 


OLD CASES 


TOTAL 


Surgical 

Medical 

Nervous 

Genito-Urinary 


560 

620 

20 

400 

410 

230 

200 

125 

240 

214 

34 

20 


1,490 

810 

25 

1,020 

1,335 

200 

140 

110 

210 

46 

40 

40 


2,050 

1,430 

55 

1,420 


Eye and Ear 


1,745 


Women 

Children 


430 
340 


Skin 


235 


Throat and Nose 


450 


Obstetric 

Proctology 


260 
74 


Stomach 


60 






Grand total 


3,073 


5,576 


8,549 
63,881 











70 



LABORATORIES 71 

LABORATORIES. 

ANATOMICAL LABORATORIES. 

These laboratories are in charge of Dr. Smith and his assist- 
ants. The University has recently built its own storage and em- 
balming plant, which supplies an abundance of anatomical material. 
Dissecting tickets must be countersigned as evidence of satisfactory 
dissecting. Anatomical material is furnished in abundance, free 
of charge. 

CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 

The Chemical Laboratory is under the supervision of Dr. Simon, 
aided by the Demonstrators. Each student during his course has 
assigned him a table and is fully supplied, with all necessary appa- 
ratus and chemicals. 

Students of the first year's class will be required to devote six 
hours weekly to work in this department. 

LABORATORY OF EXPERIMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

This laboratory occupies the first floor of Gray Laboratory; it 
includes a large student laboratory, with capacity of forty students, 
a room completely equipped for mammalian experimentation, a 
stock-room, and an office for the professor in charge. Within the 
same building there is an animal room in which there is kept a con- 
stant supply of material for experimentation and demonstration. 
The laboratory is equipped with ample apparatus: there is a com- 
plete set of student apparatus available for each group of two stu- 
dents, while the special apparatus for laboratory experimentation 
and class-room demonstration is adequate for the needs of the 
courses. 

LABORATORY OF PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The second year class is given practical instruction in the chem- 
istry of the sugars and proteins as well as a detailed course in the 
chemistry of the various secretions. The experiments performed 
by each student are adapted to illustrate not only the physiological 
but also the pathological conditions which may result in various 
diseases from perverted metabolism. The chemistry of the food 
stuffs and its practical bearing upon diet is especially dwelt upon. 



72 LABORATORIES 

The course is essentially practical, only including so much theoretical 
physiology as is necessary for a proper knowledge of the subject. 
Graduates and advanced students competent to undertake such 
work, who desire to pursue special chemical investigation, are given 
the opportunity under suitable regulations. 

LABORATORY OF HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

This laboratory is fully equipped for teaching Histology and 
Embryology. 

There is a large collection of charts, specimens and apparatus 
used in teaching. The necessary equipment for the practice of 
technique is provided. 

LABORATORIES OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

The subject of special bacteriology is taught during a portion of 
the second year in a well equipped laboratory containing sterilizers, 
water baths, and other necessary equipment for this purpose. 

The subject of histopathology is also taught during the second 
year in a properly equipped laboratory. The details concerning 
this work are described under the subject of Department of Path- 
ology and Bacteriology. 

The instruction in gross pathology is obtained during the third 
year by attendance upon the autopsies at the University Hospital, 
the Mercy Hospital, and the Maryland General Hospital, and 
special instruction in this subject is also given by demonstrations with 
a large amount of pathological material at the City Hospitals situ- 
ated at Bay View. The subject of gross pathology is also taught 
in the third year by means of lectures and demonstrations to sec- 
tions of the third year class and a special effort is made to apply 
this subject to the explanation of the symptoms and clinical signs 
of disease. The instruction in autopsy technique is also given 
personally to small groups of students. 

LABORATORIES OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

These laboratories are fully equipped for the study of practical 
laboratory work in its relationship to clinical medicine. Each 
student is supplied with a locker, containing sufficient apparatus 
for any ordinary examination. 



LIBRARIES AND MUSEUM 73 

The wards and out-patient departments of the hospitals furnish 
an abundance of material for study. 

By reason of individual equipment, much work outside of class 
hours is expected of the student. 

The class rooms are adequately lighted, and are conveniently 
situated for teaching purposes. 

LIBRARIES. 

The University Library, founded in 1813 by the purchase of the 
collection of Dr. John Crawford, now contains 13,392 volumes, 
a file of 87 current journals, and several thousand pamphlets and 
reprints. During the year ending December 31, 1916, 488 volumes 
were added. It is well stocked with recent literature, including books 
and periodicals of general interest. The home of the Library is 
Davidge Hall, a comfortable and commodious building in close 
proximity to the class rooms and the laboratories of the Medical 
Department. The Library is open daily during the year, except 
in August, for use of members of the Faculty, the students, and the 
profession generally. 

Other libraries of Baltimore are the Peabody (181,000 volumes), 
the Enoch Pratt Free Library (280,000 volumes) and the Library 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty. The last named library 
receives the leading medical publications of the world and complete 
sets of many journals are available. 

The libraries are open to students of the Medical School without 
charge. 

The proximity of Washington puts the immense libraries of the 
national capital at the disposal of students of this school. 

THE MUSEUM. 

The museum occupies a separate apartment in the main building. 
It is under the care of the curator, Dr. J. Holmes Smith and his 
assistants. It contains a large collection of anatomical preparations, 
plaster casts, charts, models, etc., used in teaching anatomy. It 
contains also a number of specimens of comparative anatomy. 
There is a large collection of gross pathological specimens and cut 
sections mounted for demonstration. For the department of obstet- 
rics, there is an excellent collection of normal and abnormal human 
embryos. 



74 , ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS 

PUBLICATIONS. 

Two journals are published by the University. The University 
Gazette is devoted to the interests of the entire University and is 
published under the auspices of the General Alumni Association. 
The Bulletin of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and 
College of Physicians and Surgeons is the publication of the Medi- 
cal School. Dr. Nathan Winslow is editor. 

ANNUAL APPOINTMENTS. 

On February first of each session the following annual appoint- 
ments are made from among the graduates of the school. 

TO THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 

Medical Superintendent. 
Five Senior Residents, viz: 

Two Resident Surgeons. 

One Resident Physician. 

One Resident Gynecologist and Obstetrician. 

One Resident Pathologist. 
Thirteen Junior Residents on a rotating service. 

A number of students are appointed each year, at the close of 
the session, as Clinical Assistants in the University Hospital for 
the summer months. 

TO THE MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Six Resident Surgeons. 
Five Resident Physicians. 
One Resident Gynecologist. 
One Resident Obstetrician. 
Two Accident Service Residents. 
One Ambulance Surgeon. 

TO THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

Medical Superintendent. 
Four Senior Residents, viz. : 

One Resident Surgeon. 

One Resident Physician. 

One Resident Gynecologist. 

One Resident Obstetrician. 
Eight Junior Residents on a rotating service. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 75 

Each resident serves a term in every department, including the 
pathological laboratory, and Maryland Lying-in Hospital. 

Many appointments to other hospitals of Baltimore are made 
annually, to which graduates of this school are eligible. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION. 

Admission to the course in medicine is by a completed Medical 
Student Certificate issued by the Board of Medical Examiners of 
Maryland. This certificate is obtained from Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
the Entrance Examiner of the Board, on the basis of satisfactory 
credentials, or by examination and credentials, and is essential for 
admission to any class. 

The requirements for the issuance of the Medical Student Certifi- 
cate are: 

(A) The completion of a standard four-year high school course, 
or its equivalent, and, in addition, 

(B) One 3 r car of college credits in chemistry, biology, physics, 
and two modern languages, to be approved by the examiner. 

(A) DETAILS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL REQUIREMENT. 

1. Graduation from an accredited high school after pursuing a 
four-year course based upon an eight-year elementary course or its 
full equivalent; 

or 

2. Successfully passing entrance examinations in the following 
subjects: 

(a) Required Ten (10) Units 

Unita. 

English 3 years 2 

Elementary Algebra to quadratics 1 

Plane Geometry (first five books) 1 

Two years of a foreign language 2 

Two of the three sciences — Biology, Chemistry, Physics 2 

American History and Civics 1 

Ancient History or History of Great Britain and Ireland 1 

(6) Electives, Five (5) Units 

(1) History and Political Science: 

Mediaeval and Modern History 1 or $ 

General History 1 or i 

Civics i 

Economics \ 



76 , REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 

- Language: Unit8 . 

English IV 1 

French 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

German 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Greek 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Hebrew 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Ii alian 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

I. at in 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Scandinavian 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

Spanish 1 or 2 years 1 or 2 

(3) A Tat hematics: 

Advanced Algebra 1 

Plane Trigonometry ^ 

Solid Geometry \ 

(4) Science: 

Physical Geography and Geology 1 

Astronomy \ 

Physiology and Hygiene \ 

(5) Vocational and cultural subjects: 

Agriculture 1 

Bookkeeping 1 

Domestic Science 1 

Drawing : Mechanical 1 and 2 \ each 

Freehand 1 and 2 \ each 

Manual Training 1 

Music 1 

Stenography 1 

One unit in any subject is the equivalent of work in that subiect for four 
or five periods per week for a } ear of at least thirty-six weeks, periods to be 
not less than forty-five minutes in length. One unit is equivalent to 2 semester 
credits or 2 points. 

(B) DETAILS OF THE COLLEGE REQUIREMENT. 

a. The preliminary college year shall extend through one college 
session of at least thirty-two weeks of actual instruction, including 
final examinations. 

b. In excellence of teaching and in content, the work of this pre- 
liminary college year shall be equal to the work done in the fresh- 
man year in standard colleges and universities. 

c. This preliminary college year shall include courses in physics, 
chemistry, biology and two of the three languages, English, French 
and German, each course to embrace at least six or eight hours of 
didactic and laboratory work in each subject, as shown in the 
schedule below. It is advisable to make the choice of the two 



REQUIREMENTS FOR MATRICULATION 



77 



languages other than that of the mother tongue of the high school 
preparation. 

Schedule 



SUBJECT 


LECTURES OR 

RECITATIONS 

PER WEEK 


LABORATORY 

PERIODS 

PER WEEK 


TOTAL HOURS 

PER 

SEMESTER 


TOTAL SEMES- 
TER HOURS 
PER TEAR 


Physics (1) 

Chemistry (1) 

Biology (1) 


I 

2 or 3 
3 
3 
3 


2 
2 

2 


4 

4 
4 

!« 


8 

8 

8 


rp , .. \ German (3) . 
Twoof the) French(3) 

Three /English (3). 


12 


Total 


12 or 13 


6 


18 


36 







Each laboratory period must extend over at least two hours. 
Or, expressed in class hours 



TOTAL HOURS TOTAL HOURS 
LECTURES OR LABORATORY 

RECITATIONS WORK 



Physics (1) 64 

Chemistry (1) 64 

Biology (1) 64 or 96 

{ German (3) i 

Two of the Three < French (3) I 192 

(English (3) j) 





Total 



384 or 416 



128 
128 

128 



3S4 



TOTAL MINI- 
MUM HOURS 
DIDACTIC AND 
LABORATORY 



192 
192 
128 

128 



768 or 800 



The valuation of credentials can be made by the Entrance Exam- 
iner only, and all students are advised to obtain from him or from 
the Dean blank forms on which to prepare a full statement of their 
previous education well in advance of their coming to Baltimore. 
Such statements are to be submitted to the Entrance Examiner for 
his advice as to the course to be pursued. 

The Entrance Examiner for Maryland is Prof. Isaac L. Otis, 
Lombard and Greene Streets, Baltimore. To him must be sub- 
mitted the credentials of all applicants, and by him is issued the 
certificate upon which the student is matriculated. 

The student is earnestly advised to qualify himself under his 
State law, and, where such certificates are issued, to receive the 



78 ' RULES 

medical students' certificate from the State authorities before enter- 
ing upon his medical studies. By adopting this course difficulties 
may be avoided. 

Graduates in Medicine desiring to take the Senior Course, with- 
out being candidates for the degree, and therefore without examina- 
tion, may receive a certificate of attendance. 

After January 1, 1918, two years of college work will be required 
for admission to the course in Medicine. 

COMBINED COURSE IN ARTS AND MEDICINE. 

St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. ; founded in 1696, is by con- 
tract of affiliation styled and recognized as the Department of 
Arts and Sciences of the University of Maryland. 

Students who have completed the Junior Year in St. John's 
College and who have made an approved choice of electives may 
if they desire it do the entire work of the Senior Year in the Medical 
School of the University. If they successfully complete the work 
of the first medical year they are graduated with their class with 
the degree of A.B., from St. John's College. 

By taking advantage of this privilege a man may complete the 
Undergraduate and Medical courses in seven years. 

During three of these years or until he has completed the work 
of the Junior class he is a resident student in St. John's College and 
for four years he is a student in the Medical School in Baltimore. 

At the end of the fourth year he receives the A.B. degree, and at 
the end of the seventh year the M.D. degree, but credit from the 
Medical School cannot be accepted in subjects for which credit 
has already been given in the College of Liberal Arts. 

In order to meet the increased requirements for matriculation 
taking effect January 1, 1914, a special Pre-Medical Course in 
Chemistry, Physics, Biology and French or German is now offered 
in St. John's College. 

RULES. 

1. Tickets for practical anatomy must be countersigned by the 
proper demonstrators. Unless properly countersigned, a ticket 
will not be accepted as evidence of a completed course. 

2. All students are required to stand the spring examinations 
unless excused by the Dean. No student will be permitted to ad- 
vance from a lower to a higher class with conditions. 



FACULTY PRIZE 79 

3. A laboratory charge of $10 will be made to each student. A 
microscope will be furnished each student in the school for his 
exclusive use. The charge for this will be $5. 

4. The graduation fee, which is $30, must be deposited with the 
Dean before the candidate can be admitted to final examination. 
This fee is returned in case the examination is unsuccessful. 

5. Should a student be required to repeat any year in the course 
he must pay regular fees. 

6. A student failing in final examination for graduation at the end 
of the fourth year will be required to repeat the entire course of the 
fourth year and to take examinations in such other branches as may 
be required, should he be again permitted to enter the school as a 
candidate for graduation. 

7. The general fitness of a candidate for graduation will be taken 
into consideration by the Faculty as well as the results of his final 
examination. 

All the above rules, as well as the fees stated below, relate to the 
year ending June 1, 1918, only. The right is reserved to make 
changes in the curriculum, requirements for graduation, fees and 
all the regulations whenever the Faculty deem it expedient. 

FEES. 

Matriculation fee (paid each year) $5.00 

Tuition fee (each year) 165 . 00 

Graduation fee 30.00 

Tuition fees are due and payable during October, and if the en- 
tire amount is paid at the Dean's office before November 1, the tui- 
tion fee for that year will be $160. 

The above fees apply to all students who matriculate in this 
institution for the first time, in any class, for the session beginning 
October 1, 1915. 

Students who have already attended one or more full courses of 
instruction in this institution will be entitled to complete the course 
in medicine at the current rates in force at the time of their first 
full course of lectures in this institution. 

Fees for individual courses not less than $25 each. 

FACULTY PRIZE. 

To stimulate study among the candidates for graduation, the 
Faculty offers a Gold Medal to the candidate who passes the best 



80 ' SCHOLARSHIPS 

general examination. Certificates of Honor are awarded to the five 
candidates standing next highest. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
The Dr Samuel Leon Frank Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Mrs. Bertha Rayner Frank as 
a memorial of the late Dr. Samuel Leon Frank, an alumnus of this 
University, entitles the holder to exemption from the payment 
of the tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University in each year upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, 
"to a medical student of the University of Maryland, who in the 
judgment of said Faculty, is of good character, and in need of pe- 
cuniae assistance to continue his medical course." 

This scholarship is awarded to a second, third or fourth year 
student only, who has successfully completed one year's work in 
the medical course, and no student may hold such scholarship for 
more than two years. 

The Charles M. Hitchcock Scholarships. 

From a bequest to the School of Medicine by the late Charles 
M. Hitchcock, M.D., an alumnus of the University, two scholarships 
have been established which entitle the holders to exemption from 
payment of tuition fees for the year. 

These scholarships are awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
to students who have meritoriously completed the work of at least 
the first year of the course in medicine, and who present to the 
Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and of 
inability to continue the course without pecuniary assistance. 

The Randolph Winslow Scholarship. 

This scholarship, established by Prof. Randolph Winslow, M.D., 
LL.D., entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 

It is awarded annually by the Trustees of the Endowment Fund 
of the University, upon nomination of the Faculty of Physic, to 
"a needy student of the Senior, Junior, or Sophomore Class of the 
Medical School. 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 



81 



"He must have maintained an average grade of 85% in all his 
work up to the time of awarding the scholarship. 

"He must be a person of good character and must satisfy the 
Faculty of Physic that he is worthy of and in need of assistance." 

The University Scholarship. 

This scholarship, which entitles the holder to exemption from 
payment of the tuition fee of the year, is awarded annually by 
the Faculty of Physic to a student of the Senior Class who presents 
to the Faculty satisfactory evidence of good moral character, and 
that he is worthy of and in need of assistance to complete the course. 

The St. John's Scholarship. 

This scholarship is awarded annually by the Faculty of Physic 
upon the nomination of the President of St. John's College. 

It entitles the holder to exemption from the payment of the 
tuition fee of that year. 



NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The personal expenses of students are at least as low in Baltimore 
as in any large city in the United States. The following estimates 
of student's personal expenses for the academic year of eight months 
have been prepared by students, and are based upon actual 
experience: 



Items. 


Low. 


Average. 


Liberal. 


Books • 

College Incidentals 

Board, eight months 

Room rent 


$ 18 

96 
48 
35 
10 


$ 32 
15 
112 
65 
50 
20 


$ 50 

20 

128 

80 


Clothing and washing 

All other expenses 


100 
75 


Total 


$207 


$294 


$453 







Students will save time and expense upon their arrival in the 
city by going direct to the School of Medicine on the University 
grounds, N.E. corner of Lombard and Greene Streets, where the 
Superintendent of Buildings, who may be found at his of lice on the 



82 i ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

premises, will furnish them with a list of comfortable and convenient 
boarding houses suitable to their means and wishes. 

The Dean will, if desired, attend to the collection of checks and 
drafts for students. 

For further information apply to 

J. M. H. Rowland, M. D., Dean, 

Lombard and Greene Streets. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. 

The following curriculum is the result of a recent and thorough 
revision of teaching in this school in order to meet modern require- 
ments. The multiplication of specialties in medicine and surgery 
necessitates a very crowded course and the question of electives is 
one which very soon will be depended on to solve some of the 
difficulties. 

The curriculum is organized under ten departments. 

1. Anatomy (including Histology and Embryology). 

2. Physiology. 

3. Chemistry including Physiological Chemistry. 

4. Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

5. Pathology and Bacteriology. 

6. Medicine (including Medical Specialties). 

7. Surgery (including Surgical Specialties). 

8. Obstetrics. 

9. Gynecology. 

10. Ophthalmology and Otology. 

The instruction is given in four years of graded work. 

Several courses of study extend through two years or more, but 
in no case are the students of different years thiown together in 
the same course of teaching. 

The first and second years are devoted largely to the study of 
the structures and functions of the normal body and laboratory 
work occupies most of the student's time during these two years. 

Some introductory instruction in Medicine and Surgery is given 
in the second year. The th rd and fourth years are almost entirely 
clinical. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 83 

A special feature of instruction in the school is the attempt to 
bring together teacher and student in close personal relationship. 
In many courses of instruction the classes are divided into small 
groups and a large number of teachers insures attention to the 
needs of each student. 

In many courses the final examination as the sole test of pro- 
ficiency has disappeared and the student's final grade is determined 
largely by partial examinations, recitations and assigned work 
carried on throughout the course. 

ARRANGEMENT OF CLASSES. 

All the teaching of the freshman class is done at Calvert and 
Saratoga Streets. All the teaching of the sophomore class is done 
at Lombard and Greene Streets. 

The junior class has three hours of didactic teaching each morning. 
For clinical instruction and laboratory work this class is divided into 
two sections and the year into semesters. Each section will work 
for one semester at the University Hospital and one semester at 
Mercy Hospital. 

The senior class is divided into three sections and for this class 
the year is divided into trimesters. Each section receives clinical 
instruction for one trimester in the University Hospital, Mercy Hos- 
pital and the Maryland General Hospital. In the afternoon the 
whole class is assembled and has two hours of didactic teaching each 
day. 

This distribution of the classes is made in order to utilize to the 
best advantage the laboratory space and to bring the students into 
daily contact with patients in all three of the large hospitals and 
dispensaries. 

DEPARTMENT OF ANATOMY INCLUDING HISTOLOGY AND 
EMBRYOLOGY. 

J. Holmes Smith, M.D Professor of Anatomy 

Tilghman B. Marden, A.B., M.D. 

Professor of Histology and Embryology and Assistant in Anatomy 

J. W. Holland, M.D Associate Professor of Anatomy 

J. L. Wright : M.D Associate in Anatomy and Histology 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Assistant in Anatomy 

First Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. This consists of lectures, recitations and conferences. 



84 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

This course embraces the integuments, myology, angiology, 
osteology, syndesmology and the peripheral nerves. 

Laboratory. Ten hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Abun- 
dance of good material is furnished and the student is aided in his 
work by competent demonstrators. Examinations are held at 
regular intervals throughout the session, and each student will be 
held to strict account for material furnished him. 

Osteology. Two hours each week for thirty-two weeks. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations, and recitations. Each student is furnished 
a skeleton and a deposit is required to insure its return at the end 
of the session. 

Second Year. Didactic. Three hours each week for thirty- 
two weeks. Lectures, recitations and conferences. 

Laboratory. Ten hours each week for sixteen weeks. This 
course includes topographical and applied anatomy of the body 
cavities and viscera and the cerebro-spinal and sympathetic nerv- 
ous systems with special demonr crations of important subjects 
to the class in small sections. 

The teaching of anatomy is illustrated by means of charts, dia- 
grams, special dissections and the projection apparatus. 

Histology. 

First Year. Lectures, recitations and laboratory work, nine 
hours each week during first semester; three hours each week dur- 
ing second semester. The most important part of the work will be 
done in the laboratory, where each student will be provided with a 
microscope, apparatus, staining fluids and material necessary for 
the preparation of specimens for microscopical examination. An 
important aid to the course is the projection microscope which is 
used for the projection upon a screen of magnified images of the 
specimens actually used in the laboratory. 

Embryology. 

Lectures, recitations and laboratory work; six hours each week 
during the second semester. 

This course includes the study of the development of the chick, 
and the fundamental principles of mammalian embryology. In 
the laboratory, the hen's egg will be studied in its various stages 
of development, and sections of the chick at different periods of 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 85 

incubation will be made and studied microscopically. The latter 
part of the course will be devoted to the study of sections through 
different regions of a mammal. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOLOGY. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Professor of Physiology 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D ' Professor of Physiology 

Charles C. Conser, M.D Associate Professor of Physiology 

Firmadge K. Nichols, A.B., M.D Associate in Physiology 

Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D.. Associate in Physiology 

The course in Physiology extends throughout the First and Second 
Years. It consists of a series of lectures, covering the field of human 
physiology, laboratory work, demonstrations, and frequent recita- 
tions. It is constantly in the mind of the department that this 
course is introductory to the study of medicine. The recitations 
cover the subject-matter of the lectures and the experiments per- 
formed in the laboratory. 

First Year. 1. This course includes lectures and recitations 
upon the physiology of the blood and circulation, respiration, 
muscle and nerve, a portion of the central nervous system, and 
special senses, and such chemical and physical facts as are neces- 
sary for a proper understanding of the physiology taught. Two 
lectures and a recitation weekly throughout the year. Dr. McGlone. 

Second Year. 2. Didactic instruction. During this year the 
remaining topics of physiology are covered by lectures and demon- 
strations. As in the first year frequent recitations will be held. 
The subject-matter includes the physiology of digestion and secre- 
tion, nutrition, eye and ear, and the cranial central nervous system. 
Lectures, demonstrations, and recitations, three hours per week. 
Dr. Hemmeter, assisted by Drs. Conser or McGlone. 

3. Experimental Physiology. This is a laboratory course in the 
dynamics of muscle and nerve, studies in circulation and respiration, 
and physiology of the special senses. Apart from the acquisition of 
the facts of physiology, the student is taught to observe accurately, 
record carefully the results of his observations, and from these re- 
sults draw an independent conclusion. He is also trained in the 
use of instruments which are of value to him in his clinical years. 
Three hours weekly throughout the year. Drs. McGlone, Conser, 
Nichols and Collenberg. 



86 ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 

4. Special Mammalian Physiology. This is a Laboratory course 
intended for advanced Laboratory students (optional) who may 
wish to do special work in this line of physiology. Hourb to be 
arranged. Dr. McGlone. 

5. Research in Physiology. Properly qualified students will be 
admitted to the laboratory which is well adapted for post-graduate 
study and special research. Hours will be arranged to suit in- 
dividuals. Dr. John C. Hemmeter. 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

E. F. Kelly, Phar.D Associate Professor of Chemistry 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate Professor of Physiological Chemistry 

Frontis Lentz, Phar.D Assistant in Chemistry 

First Year. Organic Chemistry. 1. Lectures and Recitations; 
two hours per week throughout the session. 

The course in organic chemistry is given to freshmen and extends 
throughout the year, one afternoon being devoted to practical work 
in the laboratory, and two hours a week to lectures and recitations. 

The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with the great 
r61e which the compounds of carbon play not only in industrial life, 
but also in medicine, and to lay a foundation upon which he may 
take up profitably the study of these special organic compounds 
which are so intimately connected with the manifestations of ani- 
mal and plant life, and which form the basis of the course in physio- 
logical chemistry of the sophomore year. 

Second Year. Organic and Physiological Chemistry. 1. Lec- 
tures and recitations. One hour per week throughout the session. 

This course is essentially a laboratory course extending through- 
out the year, in which the student studies practically the chemical 
properties of the various groups of food stuffs, their products of 
digestion and katabolism, as well as the various organic compounds 
which enter into the composition of the different tissues and organs 
of the body. 

The practical work is supplemented by a course of lectures in 
which the student is introduced not only to the chemical aspects of 
physiological processes, but also to those deviations from the nor- 
mal which are met with in disease. 



ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM 87 

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA AND PHARMACOLOGY. 

Samuel J. Fort. M.D Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology 

Bartgis McGlonb Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D Associate in Materia Medica 

First Year. Two hours per week throughout the session, didac- 
tic lectures on Materia Medica. Dr. Fort. 

A laboratory course in Pharmacy and prescription writing, two 
hours per week. Dr. Sinsky. 

Second Year. Two hours per week throughout the session on 
Pharmacology. Dr. Fort. 

A laboratory course of two hours per week throughout the session, 
on the physiological and toxicological action of the more important 
drags. Dr. McGlone. 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Standish McCleary, M.D Professor of Pathology 

H. R. Spencer, M.D.. .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 
Wm. Greenfeld, M.D.. . .Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology 

H. J. MaldeIs, M.D Associate Professor of Pathology 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.D Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology 

C. H. Douthirt, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

Instruction in pathology and in special bacteriology is given in 
the laboratories to the students of the second year. The course in 
pathology includes the demonstrations of the gross and microscopic 
lesions of the various viscera, and the subject of general pathology 
including inflammation, degeneration and infiltration and tumors. 

In special bacteriology the various methods of sterilization and 
preparation of culture material, the study of the pathogenic micro- 
organisms of vegetable origin, and the bacteriological study of 
milk, water, sewage and other such materials, are given. The 
bacteriological diagnosis of the infectious diseases and vaccine therapy 
are also included in this course. Animal inoculations and autopsies 
are performed in connection with the bacteria studied, and the 
diagnoses by means of serum reactions are also given. 

In the third year the subject of pathology is continued, special 
use being made of museum specimens, and the special relationship 
of gross and microscopic lesions to clinical symptoms and signs of 



88 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

disease is especially emphasized. Autopsy technique is also taught 
to small groups of students by special instruction at the autopsies 
performed at the various hospitals, and the specimens obtained at 
such autopsies are demonstrated to the entire class. The animal 
parasites are also taught in this year. 

In the fourth year the specimens from autopsies are studied with 
reference to clinical histories and gross and microscopic anatomy. 
Special emphasis is laid upon the correlation of the anatomical 
findings with the clinical symptoms and diagnosis. These clinical 
pathological conferences are also illustrated with sections of fixed 
material or lantern slides. 

Courses in surgical and gynecological pathology are also given to 
the fourth year students, but these courses are under the direction 
of the Departments of Surgery and Gynecology. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

Second Year. One hour each week for entire session. 

Medical Jurisprudence. This course embraces consideration of 
medical evidence and testimony, confidential communications, 
malpractice, indications of death, pregnancy, delivery, infanticide 
and insanity. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

DEPARTMENT OF SURGERY. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Surgery 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D Professor of Surgery 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery and Surgical Pathology 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery 

J. D. Blake, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Albert T. Chambers, M.D Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Alfred Ullman, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Walter D. Wise, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D Clinical Professor of Surgery 

William W. Requardt, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D Associate Professor of Climoal Surgery 

H. C. Blake, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 






CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 89 

Robert P. Bat, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.M., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

Harvey B. Stone, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Surgery 

R. W. Locher, M.D... Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery 

Arthur G. Barrett, M.D Associate in Surgery 

B f M. Bernheim, A.B.. M.D Lecturer on Blood Vessel Surgery 

F. L. Jennings, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

A. M. Evans, M. D Assistant in Surgery 

E. P. Smith, M.D Assistant in Operative Surgery 

The course in surgery is progressive, and aims to ground the stu- 
dent firmly in the principals of surgical science in order that later 
he may be prepared to build upon a firm foundation the superstruc- 
ture of surgical art. 

Second Year. During this year a practical course of bandaging 
is given upon the manikin; the student being required to apply person- 
ally the various forms of bandages to the different parts of the body. 

Third Year. Surgical Pathology and Principles of Surgery 
Lectures, recitations and clinics, three hours weekly. Drs. Shipley 
and War field. 

The class is divided in sections and receives instruction in history 
taking, gross surgical pathology and surgical diagnosis at the bed- 
side and in the dead house in the City Hospitals at Bay View. Drs. 
Shipley and Lynn. 

Operative Surgery. Instruction is given in operative surgery upon 
the cadaver and on dogs. The class is divided into sections and each 
section is given practical and individual work under the supervision 
of the instructors. 

This course begins with the study of the general principles of opera- 
tive surgery; anaesthesia, asepsis, antisepsis, description of instru- 
ments and sutures, etc. 

The various operations are first described and demonstrated by the 
instructor, and the student afterward practices them upon the subject. 

The entire subject of operative surgery is fully covered. Dr. Mar- 
tin and assistants. 

The class will be divided into small sections for Dispensary service 
in the University and Mercy Hospitals. 

Fourth Year. Fractures and Dislocations. Illustrated by charts, 
drawings, specimens, X-ray demonstrations, lantern slides, and the 
balopticon, two hours a week for the first semester. Dr. Winslow. 



90 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Surgery of the Blood Vascular System, Hernia, Surgery of the 
Scrotum and its contents, one hour a week for the first semester. 
Dr. Warfield. At the end of this semester, an examination will be 
given. 

Surgery of the Thorax and Thoracic Wall, the Abdominal Cavity, 
and of the Head, Neck, and Spinal Cord, two hours a week for the 
second semester. Dr. Harrison. 

Surgical Clinics. Surgical clinics will be given at the University, 
Mercy, and Maryland General Hospitals, weekly, to one third of 
the class in each hospital. Drs. Winslow, Warfield, Harrison, and 
McGlannan. 

The class is divided into sections for ward instruction in surgery, 
for instruction in operative surgery and surgical diagnosis, and the 
post-operative treatment of surgical conditions, six days a week for 
two hours each day in each of the three hospitals. Drs. Winslow, 
Shipley, Warfield, Harrison, Martin and McGlannan. 

ANAESTHESIA. 

S. Griffith Davis, M.D Associate Professor of Anaesthesia 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D Associate Professor of Anaesthesia 

Samuel W. Moore, D.D.S Instructor in Anaesthesia 

A. M. Evans, M.D Instructor in Anaesthesia 

The administration of anaesthetics is taught didactially and prac- 
tically and students are required to administer anaesthetics under 
the direction of an instructor. 

DERMATOLOGY. 

T. Caspar Gilchrist, M.R.C.S.,L.S.A.,M.D Professor of Dermatology 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

L. W. Ketron, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Dermatology 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D Demonstrator of Dermatology 

Clinical conference one hour each week to entire class. This 
course will consist of demonstrations of the common diseases of 
the skin. Dr. Gilchrist. 

Dispensary instruction, University Hospital, Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays in the diagnosis and treatment of the common 
skin diseases. First trimester, Dr. Ketron; second trimester, Dr. 
Abercrombie; third trimester, Drs. Abercrombie and Ketron. Dis- 
pensary instruction, Meroy Hospital, Dr. Rosenthal. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 91 

ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Compton Riely, M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Sydney M. Cone, A. 13., M.D Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

Henry J. Walton, M.D Associate in Roentgenology 

W. H. Daniels, M.D Demonstrator in Orthopedic Surgery 

John Evans, M.D Instructor in Roentgenology 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery 

In this course didactic, clinical, bed-side and out-patient instruc- 
tion will be given This instruction is provided in the University 
Hospital Amphitheater and Dispensary, Maryland General and 
Mercy Hospitals and Dispensaries, Kernan Hospital and Industrial 
School for Crippled Children at "Radnor Park," and in the Dis- 
pensary of same at 2000 North Charles Street. 

The senior class will be divided into three parts, each section spend- 
ing one trimester in the University, Mercy and Maryland General 
Hospitals in rotation ; and by the avoidance of duplication, the sub- 
ject will be adequately covered. Lectures, clinics and quizzes 
will be held at each of the three hospitals once a week. If possible, 
in addition, a weekly bed-side clinic will be held on Saturdays for 
small sections of the class at "Radnor Park." 

The course will cover instruction in special methods and instru- 
ments required in this surgical specialty, including X-Ray technique ; 
Wolff's law; tuberculosis of bones and joints; deformities of the 
feet; non-tuberculous deformities of the feet and joints; the paraly- 
ses; the bursal, tendinous and muscular conditions producing ortho- 
pedic affections; rickets; scurvy; osteomalacia; chondrodystrophies; 
wry-neck and the use and application of orthopedic apparatus. 

DISEASES OF THE THROAT AND NOSE. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

John R. Winslow, A. B., M.D. .Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
H. C. Davis, M.D... Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose 
George Murgatroyd, M.D.... Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

William Caspari, M.D Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose 



92 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Third Year. Clinical Lectures. One hour each week through- 
out the session. Drs. Merrick, John R. Winslow, and Sanger. 

Fourth Year. Dispensary instruction daily in small sections 
at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy Hospitals. Ward 
classes one hour each week at the University, Maryland General, 
and Mercy Hospitals. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Page Edmunds, M.D Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

W. B. Wolf, M.D Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D.. Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 
Anton G. Rytina, A.B., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

The course, which is entirely clinical, is taught chiefly by personal 
instruction in the dispensaries of the University, Mercy and Maryland 
General Hospitals, one trimester being spent at each hospital. 
The student assumes the responsibility of certain cases under the 
supervision of instructors. 

The course includes the diagnosis, pathology and treatment of 
venereal diseases and syphilis together with a careful study of the 
less common genito-urinary diseases. The course includes instruc- 
tion in urinalysis, in endoscopic and cystoscopic examinations and 
the use of other instruments for the diagnosis and treatment of 
genito-urinary diseases. Many minor operations are performed in 
the out-patient department by students under the supervision of 
the chiefs of clinic. 

DISEASES OF THE COLON AND RECTUM. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Charles F. Blake, M.D Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Rectum and Colon 

Fourth Year. This course is for instruction in diseases of the 
Colon, Sigmoid Flexure, Rectum and Anus. 

One lecture a week throughout the year will be given in the Clini- 
cal Amphitheater of the Hospitals. The lecture will cover the 
essential features of the Anatomy and Physiology of the large in- 
testine; as well as the various diseases to which it is subject. The 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 



93 



importance of diseased conditions and malpositions of the intestines, 
in relation to systemic disturbances, will be emphasized by demon- 
strations. 

In small groups, the students will be taken into the wards and 
dispensaries of the University, Mercy, and Maryland General Hos- 
pitals, where different phases of the various diseases will be taught 
by direct observation and examination. The use of the proctoscope 
and sigmoidoscope in examination of the rectum and sigmoid will 
be made familiar to each student. 

A course in Proctoscopy will be given in the City Hospitals at 
Bay View, where abundance of material is always obtainable. 

DEPARTMENT OF MEDICINE 



Charles W. Mitchell, A.M., M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. 

Cart B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D. 

John S. Fulton, A.B., M.D. 

Chas. G. Hill, A.M., M.D 

Joseph E. Gichner, M.D. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D. 

John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. 

Thomas W. Keown, AB., M.D. 

Wm. I. Messick, M.D. 

A. H. Carroll, M.D. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. 

H. D. McCartt, M.D. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D. 

Frank W. Keating, M.D. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D. 

J. F. Hawkins, M.D. 

D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D 

E. E. Mater, M.D. 

M. H. Todd, A.B., M.D. 

John S. Fenby, M.D. 

E. Le Compte Cook, M.D. 

Frank J. Powers, M.D. 

J. W. V. Clift, M.D. 

D. C Streett, "AB., M.D. 



John C Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D. 

Sc.D., LL.D. 
William F. Lockwood, M.D. 
Standish McCleary, M.D. 
Jose L. Hirsh, A.B., M.D. 
Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. 
Chas. O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., 

LL.D. 
J. M. Craighill, M.D. 
Chas. W. McElfresh, M.D. 
C.Hampson Jones, M.B., CM., M.D 
G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 
Harvey G. Beck, M.D., D.Sc 
E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D. 
J. Clement Clark, M.D. 
Hubert C. Knapp, M.D 
G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D 
T. Fred Leitz, M.D. 
Wm. H. Smith, M.D. 
J. Percy Wade, M.D. 
R. C. Metzel, M.D. 
Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D 
J. Harry Ullrich, M.D. 
J. J. O'Mara, M.D. 
Benjamin Pushkin, M.D 
J. E. Brumback, M.D. 
J. G. Stiefel, M.D 
Theodore Morrison. M.D 
M. Feldman, M.D. 
C. C. Hablestov, M.D. 
S. D. Shannon, M.D 



9 I CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 

Second Year. Didactic lectures and practical demonstrations 
in medical topography and the physical conditions in health, pre- 
paratory to the course in physical diagnosis in the third year. Two 
and one-half hours each week during the second semester. 

Third Year. The class is divided into small groups, and each 
section receives instruction for the entire session in the medical 
dispensaries of the hospitals. During the second semester, the 
students under the supervision of instructors examine and treat 
patients in the medical dispensaries. During one semester small 
groups are sent for the afternoon to the city hospitals at Bay View 
for special instruction in history taking and physical diagnosis. 
Two hours a week throughout the year is devoted to physical diag- 
nosis. Full class conferences one hour a week throughout the 
session. 

CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations on the principles of medi- 
cine, for three hours a week throughout the session. Clinical con- 
ference, one hour each week throughout the session. 

Fourth Year. Lectures, recitations and clinics tc the entire 
class three hours a week throughout the session. 

A clinical pathological conference is held once a week through- 
out the session, at which the material obtained through operations 
or at autopsy is studied in relation to the clinical findings. 

The whole class, divided between the three hospitals and again 
subdivided into small groups, receives bedside instruction twelve 
hours a week throughout the session and has the care of the hospital 
patients under the direct supervision of the hospital staff, making 
all examinations and keeping the clinical history of the patient. 

During one trimester the student must live in the hospital dor- 
mitories, and in this manner receive experience as an intern. 

Dispensary instruction is given nine hours a week in the special- 
ties of medicine. 

PEDIATRICS. 

Third Year. Lecture recitation one hour a week throughout 
the session. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 95 

Fourth Year. Clinic recitation one hour a week throughout 
the year and in addition ward class instruction to small groups one 
hour a week during one trimester. 

Dispensary instruction in pediatrics is given to small groups 
throughout the year. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

Physical Therapeutics. This course consists of weekly lectures 
and demonstrations on hydrotherapy, thermotherapy, massage, 
rest and exercise, the Weir Mitchell Treatment, radiotherapy and 
electrotherapeutics. The basic physiologic principles and actions 
of the above mentioned agencies are given full consideration and 
study, and the practical application is observed in the hospital and 
clinic and in visits to various institutions having well equipped 
departments for treatment by physical means. 

Third Year. This course is supplementary to that on clini- 
cal medicine and an effort is made to familiarize the student with 
the practical treatment of disease. (One hour a week.) 

Fourth Year. This subject is covered in conjunction with the 
teaching of clinical medicine. 

GASTRO-ENTEROLOGY. 

Fourth Year. Clinic recitation to each third of the class for 
one hour a week throughout the session. Dispensary instruction 
to small groups during part of the session. Practical instruction 
in the wards in the differential diagnosis of diseased conditions of 
the alimentary tract. 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

A practical course is given in the tuberculosis dispensary and 
at the Municipal Tuberculosis Hospital to small groups, the 
abundance of the material, both of "incipient" and "advanced cases" 
making this course of value in the practical recognition of the 
physical signs of the disease. 

NEUROLOGY. 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations one hour each week to 
entire class throughout the year. This course comprises the study 
of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, the method 



96 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

of neurological examination, and relationship of signs and symptoms 
to pathological conditions. The material at the University, Mary- 
land General, and Mercy Hospitals is available. 

Fourth Year. Clinical lectures and recitations; one hour each 
week throughout the entire session. 

Clinical Conference, one hour each week to the entire class. This 
subject is taught at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals. All cases presented at these clinics are carefully ex- 
amined; complete written records are made by the students who 
demonstrate the cases before the class. These cases are usually 
assigned one or two weeks before they are presented, and each 
student in the class must prepare one or more cases during the year. 

Ward Class Instruction. In small sections, two hours each week 
during entire year at the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals. In these classes the students come in close personal 
contact with the cases in the wards under the supervision of the 
instructor. 

Dispensary Instruction. Small sections are instructed in the 
dispensaries of the University, Maryland General, and Mercy 
Hospitals four afternoons each week. In this way students are 
brought into contact with nervous diseases in their earlier as well 
as later manifestations. 

Electro Therapeutics. Instruction in the uses of the various 
types of electrical apparatus is given by lectures and demonstra- 
tions in the clinics, the ward classes, and the out-patient depart- 
ment. 

PSYCHIATRY. 

Fourth Year. This subject is taught by means of didactic 
and clinical lectures. Abundant material is at the command of 
this department in the various institutions which are presided over 
by the teachers in psychiatry. The student is brought into contact 
with the early manifestations of mental disease in the dispensaries 
of the University, Maryland General, and Mercy Hospitals, and 
in a series of clinics opportunity is afforded to observe the course 
and later manifestations of the disease, often in these same patients, 
at the Sheppard Enoch Pratt Hospital, Springfield State Hospital, 
Spring Grove State Hospital, Mount Hope Retreat, Maryland Train- 
ing School for the Feeble Minded, and City Detention Hospital. 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 97 

STATE MEDICINE. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and demonstrations one hour each 
week to the entire class throughout the session. 

The course in state medicine begins with a study of structure 
and function of the social organism, as revealed by the numerical 
analysis of population, births, deaths, sickness and migration. 
Elementary instruction and practice are given in vital statistics; 
in medical notification, registration and certification; and in the 
laws and ordinances concerning public health. The specific hy- 
giene of the preventable diseases is next taken up, such choice be- 
ing made as will familiarize the student with the epidemiology of 
the more important communicable diseases, and with the main 
instruments of prevention: notification, inspection, segregation, 
isolation, immunization and disinfection. The course is planned 
from the view 7 point of official practice in public hygiene. 

One lecture is given each week to the members of the Senior Class, 
frequently by Government officials who are recognized authorities 
on diseases peculiar to the tropics. 

DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS. 

L. E. Neale, A.M., M.D., LL.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Geo. W. Dobbin, M.D Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D Professor of Obstetrics 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

Charles E. Brack, M.D Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

Glenn M. Litsinger, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D Associate Professor of Obstetrics 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

Emil Novak, M.D Associate in Obstetrics 

J. McF. Bergland Associate in Obstetrics 

H. N. Freeman, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

M. E. Douglass, M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 

Wm. B. Schapiro, M.D Assistant in Obstetrics 

Third Year. Lectures and recitations two hours each w r eek 
by Drs. Neale and Dobbin to entire class. Special obstetric 
and gynecologic pathology three hours each week by Drs. Brent 
and Lazenby to class sections in the Pathologic Laboratory. 
Clinical Obstetrics (bedside and manikin work) three hours each 
week at the University Hospital by Dr. Neale and his assistants, 



98 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

and at the Mercy Hospital by Drs. Brack, Litsinger, Lazenby and 
Novak. 

Examinations, one at end of first semester and final one at end 
of the year. The results of these examinations considered in con- 
junction with the student's practical work, will determine the 
grade for the year's work, which grades, if sufficient to give student 
advanced standing, will count as one-half of the final grade in 
Obstetrics. 

Fourth Year. Lectures and Clinical Conferences. Two hours 
each week to the entire class. Drs. Neale, Dobbin and Rowland. 

Ward Classes and Operative Obstetrics (Manikin work). Four 
hours each week to sections of the class. 

Students are required to attend obstetric cases before, during 
and after confinement in the University Hospital, Maryland Ly- 
ing-in Hospital and Maryland Lying-in Asylum, as well as in the 
out-patient department. Each student is required to conduct and 
make accurate records of at least twelve confinement cases. These 
out-patient cases are conducted under the supervision of post- 
graduate instructors, two in number, who devote their whole time 
to this work. 

Mid-year and final examinations will be held, the results of which, 
considered in conjunction with clinical work and recitations, will 
make up the remaining half of the final grade. 

This School is peculiarly fortunate in the clinical material avail- 
able for this important branch of medical teaching; more than 2000 
cases in the three hospitals and their out-patient departments make 
a practically inexhaustible clinic. 

DEPARTMENT OF GYNECOLOGY. 

William S. Gardner, M.D Professor of Gynecology 

VV. B. Perry, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

Hugh Brent, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

Abraham Samuels, M.D Associate Professor of Gynecology 

E. H. Hayward, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

Geo. A. Strauss, M.D Associate in Gynecology 

R. G. Willse, M.D Demonstrator of Gynecology 

W. K. White, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

H. S. Street, B.S., M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

J. M. Fenton, M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

Maurice Lazenby, A.B., M.D Assistant in Gynecology 

L. H. Douglass, M.D '. Assistant in Gynecology 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 99 

Third Year. Didactic Work. Lectures and recitations one hour 
each week throughout the session. 

Laboratory. Special pathology, both gross and microscopical, 
studied in connection with the clinical history of each specimen, 
two hours each week for one semester. 

Fourth Year. Didactic Work. Lectures and recitations one 
hour each week throughout the session. 

Clinical Work. Six hours weekly for one trimester. In this 
course a student writes the clinical history of each patient in the 
ward, makes a general physical examination including the blood 
and urine, before the patient is brought before the class. One stu- 
dent under supervision gives the anesthetic, a pelvic examination 
is made by six students, and any operation required is then done 
before a section of the class small enough to see clearly what is 
being done and how it is done. On a subsequent day the whole 
group examine microscopically sections prepared from material 
removed from patients that have been before them. 

DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND OTOLOGY. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D... Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Hiram Woods, A.M.. M.D Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. Frank Crouch, M.D... .Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology and Otology 

Wm. Tarun, M.D Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology 

J. W. Downey, M.D Associate in Otology 

Edward A. Looper. M.D., D.Oph.. Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology 
R. D. West, M.D Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology 

Third Year. Practical Course in the anatomy, gross and micro- 
scopic, and in the physiology of the eye and the ear; this course con- 
sists of dissections, microscopic sections, demonstration on models, 
etc., once weekly throughout one half the year. — Dr. Tarun. 

Practical Course in the Methods of Examination of the eye, includ- 
ing the use of the ophthalmoscope, and of the ear, including the 
tests of the auditory apparatus. — Drs. Fleckenstein and Downey. 

Fourth Year. Didactic Course in Diseases of the Eye once 
weekly October to February, Dr. Woods; February to close of 
session, Dr. Harry Friedenwald. 

Didactic Course in Diseases of the Ear, Dr. Crouch once weekly 
for half the year. 



100 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Clinics in diseases of the eye and ear to sections of the class once 
weekly, by Drs. Harry Friedenwald, Woods and Crouch. 

Dispensary Instruction to small sections. 

The courses in Ophthalmology and Otology are designed to 
familiarize the students with the common diseases of the eye and 
ear, their recognition and treatment, with a view to meet the needs 
of the general practitioner. Special emphasis is laid upon the re- 
lation between diseases of the eye and the ear and systemic diseases 
of other organs. 

LABORATORIES OF CLINICAL PATHOLOGY. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D Professor of Clinical Pathology 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Charles C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D Associate in Clinical Pathology 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D Associate in Clinical Pathology 

W. M. Lewis, M.D Associate in Clinical Pathology 

H. M. Todd, M.D Associate in Clinical Pathology 

During the third year the student is thoroughly drilled in the tech- 
nique of clinical laboratory work so that he shall be capable of per- 
forming all routine examinations which may be called for during his 
fourth year, in connection with the work in the wards and the dis- 
pensary. To this end every student is provided with a microscope 
for his exclusive use, and every two students with a special labora- 
tory outfit, including blood counters, hemoglobinometers, burettes, 
pipettes, beakers, test tubes, evaporating dishes, and staining 
reagents. 

The instruction is to a great extent individual, which is rendered 
possible, owing to the unusually large teaching staff in this 
department. 

The practical work is supplemented by a series of didactic lec- 
tures, recitations and demonstrations in which the clinical signifi- 
cance of the microscopical, chemical, bacteriological and serological 
findings in connection with the examinations of the blood, gastric 
juice, feces, sputum, urine, exudates and transudates, are thoroughly 
considered. 

During the fourth year the student applies in the student labora- 
tories of the various affiliated hospitals what he has learned during 
the preceding year. To give an idea of the extent to which this 
work is carried it may be mentioned that at one of these hospitals 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 101 

alone over 7000 examinations of various kinds were made by stu- 
dents during the past academic year. 

The student laboratories are open at all hours of the day. and 
from 9 to 11 a.m. a special instructor is available to give any 
assistance that may be desired. 

THE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 
Mary E. Sullivan, R.N., M.U.H. 1911, Superintendant of Training Schools. 

The University Hospital Training School for Nurses was organized 
December 14, 1889, and offers a three years' course of training. 

Those wishing to obtain the course of instruction must apply 
personally or by letter to the Superintendent of Nurses, who will 
furnish printed instructions respecting the personal information 
to be given by applicants. Letters of application should be accom- 
panied by a statement from a clergyman testifying to good moral 
character and from a physician certifying to sound health and 
unimpaired faculties. Applicants must be between twenty-one 
and thirty-five years of age, of at least average height and phj^sique, 
and must give satisfactory evidence of fitness in disposition and 
temperament for the work of nursing. 

If approved, applicants are received into the school for a period 
of six months on probation, during which time demonstration classes 
are held, and instruction is given in the elementary part of the 
training. 

Classes are formed and pupils are received in the spring and 
autumn. 

High school graduates and women of higher education are given 
the preference. Their superior preparation makes them better 
fitted for the opportunities that are opening up in the profession 
of nursing. Graduates of this school are eligible for Red Cross 
and all Government work. 

The Superintendent of Nurses decides as to the fitness of proba- 
tioners for the work, and the propriety of retaining or dismissing 
them, and she may at any time terminate the connection of a pupil 
with the school in case of misconduct, inefficiency or neglect of 
duty. 

Except under special circumstances failure to pass the examina- 
tions at the end of the first year is considered a sufficient cause for 
the termination of a student's connection with the school. 






102 TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

Students reside in the home and serve as assistants in the various 
departments of the Hospital for the full three years. They are ex- 
pected to perform any duty assigned to them by the Superintendent 
of Xurses. 

After the period of probation, students are required, when on 
duty, to wear the dress prescribed by the Hospital, which is blue 
and white striped gingham, with white apron and cap and linen 
collar and curls. Probationers are not allowed to wear this dress. 

To the University Hospital belongs the honor of bestowing upon 
its graduates a cap that possesses a real history — the Florence Night- 
ingale cap, installed by Miss Parsons, a graduate of St. Thomas 
Hospital, London, and the first superintendent of the University 
Hospital Training School for Nurses. 

Day Nurses are on duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. with one hour 
for dinner, and three hours for rest and recreation. They are given 
an afternoon each week and part of every Sunday. Each student 
is required to devote at least one hour daily to lecture, class work 
or study. A vacation of three weeks is allowed each year. 

In sickness all students are cared for gratuitously, but the time 
so lost must be made up. 

The course of training includes practical instruction in the nurs- 
ing of medical, surgical, orthopedic, gynecological patients, ob- 
stetrics, the nursing of children, and the operating room work. 

A course of lectures is given by the physicians and surgeons of 
the University, and class instruction with demonstrations by the 
Superintendent of Nurses and her assistants. Examinations are 
held at stated periods. 

When the full term of three years is ended, the nurses thus trained 
will be at liberty to choose their own fields of labor, whether in 
hospitals, in private families, or in the various branches of social 
work which offer opportunities for the woman of ability. A diploma 
is given upon completion of course of training. 

In addition to board, lodging and a reasonable amount of laundry 
work, each student receives an allowance of $5.00 per month to 
defray the expenses of uniforms, text-books, etc., incidental to her 
training. 

Graduates, 1917. 

Adeline Bell Cavaxo Maryland 

Jane Adalixe Pexxewell ' Maryland 

Mtrtle May Fahrxey Maryland 

Elizabeth Louisa Marsh Maryland 

Bertha May Qutgley Maryland 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOK NURSE8 103 

Marguerite Eugenia Risley Maryland 

Lucy Edith Mouse W 

Laura Augusta Keffeh Virginia 

LlLLIE SEATON HfmGES Maryland 

Anna Carlyle R«.jdinson Nev 

Nancy Josephine K lase Virginia 

Jemima Minnis Pennsylvania 

Nancy Minnis Pennsylvania 

Catherine Ethel Monroe Maryland 

Emily Elizabeth Kenney Delaware 

Annette Purcelle Stoneham Virginia 

Ellen Christene Lloyd Maryland 

Elsie Mae Simpson Maryland 

Helen Louise Dearmyer Michigan 

Rhetta Catherine Shertzer Pennsylvania 

Norma Augusta Thorn New Jersey 

Anna Roeder Mohler District of Columbia 

Olive Ellen Murray Maryland 

Leonora Andrews Cecil Maryland 



THE MERCY HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES. 

The Merc}^ Hospital Training School for Nurses, conducted by the 
Sisters of Mercy and connected with the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, was organized and incorporated under the general laws 
of the State of Maryland in 1899. Its first students were graduated 
in 1901; and on the passage of the bill for registration in 1904, the 
Sisters of Mercy, connected with the Hospital service, received 
certificates as registered nurses. 

The Training School was affiliated with the Board of Regents of 
the State of New York in 1906 ; and, in the same year, the Alumnae 
Association was incorporated, having been previously connected 
with the Associated Alumnae of the United States. The graduates, 
as active members, have been much interested in the movements 
of the Maryland Association of Graduate Nurses, to whom they have 
given every encouragement to uplift the profession in its many 
works of district nursing, tuberculosis caaxipaign, Red Cross move- 
ments, etc. 

The requirements for entrance are: highest moral standing, 
health, intelligence, and a High School education or its equivalent. 
The age limit is twenty to thirty-five years. 

After a three months' probation, candidates, if they possess the 
necessary qualifications, are admitted to the Training School proper, 
receiving five dollars a month wherewith to secure uniforms, text 
books, etc., the education they receive being considered their com- 
pensation. The right is reserved to dismiss pupils for any cause 



104 TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 

which may be deemed sufficient by the Sister Superior or Superin- 
tendent. 

The course of training comprises three years of theory and prac- 
tice. The clinical advantages are exceptional. The medical, 
surgical, orthopedic, gynecological, obstetrical, children's and 
dietetic departments give valuable practical experience. The nurses 
are taught the theory of nursing by class recitations and demon- 
strations by efficient Sister instructors. Supplementing this train- 
ing is a course of lectures from the ablest professors of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland School of Medicine and College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, who are untiring in their efforts to keep the School abreast 
with modern scientific developments. 

Graduates, 1917. 

Sister M. Hilda Bushman* Maryland 

Sister M. Hildegard Holbein Maryland 

Sister M. Alotsius Kavanaugh Georgia 

Beulah Dohl Atkixs Virginia 

Eloise Biser Maryland 

Mart Burke Pennsylvania 

Anna Belle Burn*s West Virginia 

Mary Estelle Carver Maryland 

Mart Caroline Christt West Virgin ia 

Marjorie Alricks Duncan Maryland 

Mae Agnes Fannin Virginia 

Helen Edna Harbour West Virginia 

Mary Adelia Kelly Maryland 

Adla Marie Mansur Syria 

Madeline de Sales Roche Pen nsylvania 

Anne Rosalia Sappington Maryland 

Edna Frances Sappington Maryland 

Aurele Beatrice Vogel Pennsylvania 

Mary Ruth Worthington Maryland 

MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES . 
Miss George Allen Hutton, R.N., Superintendent of Training School. 

The Maryland General Hospital Training School for Nurses 
has been in successful operation since 1891. 

In 1909 the Training School was registered with the Board of 
Regents of the State of New York. 

Its purpose is to give to young women desiring to understand the 
science and acquire the art of nursing the sick and injured, the 
opportunity, through instruction and training, to qualify themselves 
for efficient and skillful work in their humane and useful mission. 

A candidate for admission must be between 19 and 35 years 
of age. 



TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES 105 

She must have a High School education or pass an examination 
in the subjects embraced in, or equivalent to, the first two years' 
curriculum of the High School's of the State of Maryland, and is 
required to fill in a " student nurse's application" furnished by the 
State Board of Examiners, which is passed upon by Mr. Charles R. 
Ramft, Examiner of Preliminary Education. 

She must present a certificate from her family physician testi- 
fying as to good health and proper physical condition, and certifi- 
cates from two other responsible persons. 

The first six months will constitute a period of probation, in which 
the candidate must show her fitness before she will be finally ac- 
cepted as a pupil. The school reserves the right of suspension or 
dismissal at any time, for inefficiency, misconduct, or infraction 
of the rules of discipline. 

A vacation of two weeks each year is granted. 

Pupils are cared for without expense in case of illness, provided 
they remain in the hospital and are attended by members of the 
Medical Staff. 

The full course of instruction will extend over a period of three 
calendar years. During the probationary period practical demon- 
strations are given in the class room, four hours each week. Nurses 
in training receive instruction in the nursing of medical, surgical, 
orthopedic, gynecological patients, in operating room work, and 
also in obstetrics and the nursing of children; in addition to which, 
courses of lectures are given by the visiting physicians and sur- 
geons of the Maryland General Hospital. 

All examinations must be successfully passed before the pupil 
will be advanced to the work of the following year. 

Graduates, 1917. 

Mildred E. Hoover Pennsylvania 

Wilheuina Habert Maryland 

Sub Robinson West Virginia 

Louise Catherine Lenderking Maryland 

Martha A nn Bendall Virginia 

Margaret Ida Collison Delaware 

Mtrtle Theresa Jenkins Maryland 

Edna Lee Morris Virginia 

Anna Katherine Klein Maryland 

Mary Kathrtne Bangeht Pennsylvania 

Mildred Vincent Ashley Maryland 

Elsie Reece Clark Virginia 



106 ENDOWMENT FUND 

ENDOWMENT FUND. 

The following, all Alumni of the University, constitute the Board 
of Trustees of this Fund: 

Hon. Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. John B. Thomas, Ph. G. 

Harry Adler, M.D. B. Merrill Hopkinson, M.D. 

Charles Markell, LL.B. Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. 

Stuart S. Janney, Esq. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S. 

This Board is incorporated by act of the Legislature of the State, 
its legal title being "The Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland/' and is independent and self-perpetuat- 
ing, filling itself any vacancies. Its powers are limited to the ex- 
penditure of the interest derived from the fund, which is to be applied 
in the discretion of the Board for the benefit of the University. 
Contributions, donations and bequests are solicited from Alumni 
and friends. They may be made to the general or University 
Fund, to the Medical Fund or to any other department of the Uni- 
versity. If intended for the School of Medicine, they may be 
given to the general medical fund or to some special object, as build- 
ing, research, library, pathology, hospital, publication, laboratories, 
gymnasium, scholarship, medal, prize, etc., in which case the wishes 
of the donor will be strictly regarded. Attention is invited to the 
1 'Charles Frick Research Fund," already established in memory 
of that distinguished investigator. Checks should be made pay- 
able to Charles Markell, Treasurer, 1137 Calvert Building, Bal- 
timore, Md. 

FORMS OF DEVISE OR BEQUEST. 
To School of Medicine. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Regents of the University of Maryland, 
a corporation incorporated under the laws of the State of Maryland, for the 
benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property.) 

To Endowment Fund. 

I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of the Endowment Fund of the 
University of Maryland, a corporation incorporated under the laws of the 
State of Maryland, for the benefit of the Faculty of Physic 

(Here state amount or describe property J 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL DEPARTMENT. 

All alumni in good standing are eligible to membership. 

The membership fee is $1.00 per annum, payable in March. 

The annual meetings are held on or about Commencement Day, andean 
orator will be selected to deliver an address upon these occasions. 

The Banquet, which follows the delivery of the oration, is a reunion of old 
classmates, to which members who have paid their dues in full and candidates 
who have paid their initiation fee are admitted without extra charge. 

The following are the officers for the current year: 

President. 
Dr. J. M. H. Rowland. 

Vice-Presidents. 

Dr. W. F. Lockwood. 

Dr. Arthur M. Shipley. 

Dr. Alexius McGlannan. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Dr. Edward A. Looper. 

Recording Secretary. 
Dr. Geo. M. Settle. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
J. S. Fort. 

Necrologist. 
Dr. Jos. T. Smith. 

Executive Committee. 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll, Chairman. 
Dr. B. Merrill Hopkinson Dr. Jos. Holland 

Dr. C. W. Vogel Dr. H. M. Jones 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS. 

President. 
C. W. Vogel, M.D. 

1st Vice-President. 
Humphry D. Wolfe, M.D. 

2nd Vice-President. 

W. C. Stifler, M.D. 

107 



108 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS 



Secretary. 
H. C. Knapp, M.D. 

Treasurer. 
C. E. Brack, M.D. 

Executive Committee. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 
H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D. A. C. Gillis, M.D. 



THE GENERAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND. 

President. 
Dr. Albert H. Carroll, The Walbert Apartments. 

Vice-President. 
Edward P. Crummer. 

Treasurer. 
George Maurice Lee. 

Corresponding Secretary. 
William K. Sttchel, Baltimore and Light Streeta. 

Recording Secretary. 
Frank E. Welsh, Jr. 

Advisory Council. 
Medical. 

Dr. William F. Lockwood 
Dr. Arthur M. Shipley 
Dr. Charles A. Vogel 



Dr. Merrill Hopkinson 
Dr. Nathan R. Gorter 
Dr. Charles O'Donovan 



Judge Alfred J. Niles 
Hon. Wm. Milnes Maloy 
Hon. Oregon Milton Dennis 



Dr. Timothy H. Heatwole 
Dr. Eldridge Baskin 
Dr. C. C Harris 



Dr. John S. Thomas 
Dr. Eugene W. Hodson 
Dr. Henry P. Hynson 



Legal. 

Mr. Thomas Foley Hiskey 
Mr. Joseph C. France 
Mr. Wm. Pepper Constable 

Dental. 

Dr. Samuel C. Pennington 
Dr. L. Wilson Davis 
Dr. Francis J. Valentine 

Pharmaceutical. 

Dr. John F. Hancock 
Dr. David P. Millard 
Dr. James W. Westcott 






YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 109 

Academic. 
Judge Walter I. Dawkins Dr. James A. Nydegger 

Dr. Thomas Fell Dr. James D. Iglehart 

Mr. E. John W. Revell Mr. Harry E. Blake 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

The Y. M. C. A., since its establishment nineteen years ago, has had a 
splendid influence in helping to mould the character of the students at the 
University. 

All students in each department of the University are eligible to active or 
associate membership. Membership in the University Association entitles 
the holder to special privileges in the City Association. Bible and Mission 
Study Classes and Social Service Work are promoted by the Association and 
every effort is exerted to build morality and strong Christian character. 

A committee will be on hand in Davidge Hall at the opening of the session 
to welcome all new students to the University. This committee will be glad 
to render assistance in securing comfortable rooms and boarding houses, and 
will extend every other courtesy possible. Each new student will be handed 
a copy of the handbook, a publication issued by the Y. M. C. A., containing 
valuable information. 

All young men who intend to enter the University are cordially invited to 
share in the privileges and work of the Association. 

The officers named will be glad to furnish any information desired in re- 
gard to the Association, and will be glad to render any assistance. Corre- 
spondence should be addressed to B. S. John, President, or A. E. Lindley, 
Intercollegiate Secretary. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND SCIENCES. 
St. John's College, Annapolis, Md. 
THE FACULTY. 

Thomas Fell, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., President, Professor of Moral Science. 

John Brockway Rippere, M.A., Vice-President (Graduate of Wesleyan University), Professor 
of Latin. 

John B. White, M.A., L.H.D. (Graduate of Geneva College), Professor of Greek and Latin. 

Benjamin Harrison Waddell, M.A., L.H.D. (Graduate of Washington and Lee University), 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Adolf Schumacher, Ph.D. (Graduate of Gottingen University, and University of Pennsylvania) 
Professor of Modern Languages. 

Reginald H. Ridgely, B.S., M.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Biology. 

Sidney S. Handy, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Columbia University), Professor of English. 

Clarence W. Stryker, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of Union College), Professor of History and 
Economics. 

Joseph W. MacNaugher, A.B., A.M. (Graduate of Harvard University), Professor of Chemistry. 

Harold Brenton Scarborough, B.A., M.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Professor of Draw- 
ing and Physics. 

Jon Millikin, U.S.A., Lieutenant United States Army, Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
and Lecturer on International and Constitutional Law. 

Thomas L. Gladden, M.A., Instructor in Latin and Mathematics. 

Roscoe E. Grove, B.A. (Graduate of St. John's College), Instructor in German and English. 

Harry Roberts, Assistant in English. 

Sarah Berry, Registrar and Secretary for the President. 



DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY. 

The Regular Winter Season begins on October 1 of each year, and continues until the follow- 
ing May. 

The requirements for admission are the same as in all other reputable dental colleges. 

FACULTY. 

J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., LL.D., Professor of Physiology. 

Timothy O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Dental Materia Medica and Therapeutics, and 

Dean of Faculty. 
Isaac H. Davis, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. 
J. William Smith, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Prosthesis. 

Elmer E. Cruzen, D.D.S., Professor of Crown and Bridge Work and Ceramics. 
E. Frank Kelly, Phar. D., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. 

B. Merrill Hopkinson, A.M., M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Oral Hygiene and Dental History. 
Eldridge Baskin, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Orthodontia and Associate Professor of Clinical 

Dentistry. 
Clyde V. Matthews, D.D.S., Professor of Histology. 
Robert P. Bay, M.D., Instructor in Oral Surgery. 
Alex. H. Paterson, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Technics. 
Robert L. Mitchell, M.D., Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 
J. L. Wright, M.D., Associate Professor of Anatomy. 

L. Whiting Farinholt, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Crown-Bridge, Porcelain and Inlay Work. 
H. M. Davis, D.D.S., Chief Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
S. Whtteford Moore, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. 
J. Ben Robinson, D.D.S., Director of Infirmary and Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
Frank P. Haynes, D.D.S., Lecturer on Dental Anatomy. 
B. Sargent Wells, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Francis J. Valentine, A.M., D.D.S., Assistant Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
E. Fitzroy Phillips, D.D.S., Assistant Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

110 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 111 

DEPARTMENT OF LAW. 

FORTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

THE BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Dean. 

Alfred Bagby, Jr., Esq., Testamentary Law. 

Forrest Bramble,, Esq., Commercial Law. 

J. Wallace Bryan, Esq., Common Carriers. 

Howard Bryant, Esq., Practice in State Courts. 

W. Calvin Chesnut, Esq., Insurance. 

Ward B. Coe, Esq., Title and Conveyancing. 

William C. Coleman, Esq., Bills and Notes. 

James U. Dennis, Esq., Personal Property, Including Bailments. 

Edwin T. Dickerson, Esq., Contracts. 

Joseph C. France, Esq., Corporations. 

Eli Frank, Esq., Torts. 

Hon. James P. Gorteb, Evidence and Pleading. 

Hon. Henry D. Harlan, Domestic Relations. 

Charles McH. Howard, Esq., Equity Jurisprudence. 

Arthur L. Jackson, Esq., Conflict of Laws and International Law. 

Sylvan H. Lauchheimer, Esq., Bankruptcy and Banking Law. 

Hon. Alfred S. Niles, Constitutional Law. 

Eugene O'Dunne, Esq., Criminal Law and Medical Jurisprudence. 

William Lee Rawls, Esq., Corporations. 

Albert C. Ritchie, Esq., Elementary Law. 

Hon. John C. Rose, Jurisdiction and Procedure of the Federal Courts, Admiralty, Shipping Patents 

Trade-Marks and Copyrights. 
G. Ridgley Sappington, Esq., Practice Court. 
Herbert T. Tiffany, Esq., Real Property. 
Clarence A. Tucker, Esq., Equity Procedure. 
Joseph N. Ulman, Esq., Sales of Personal Property. 

For catalogue containing full information, address, EDWIN T. DICKERSON, Secretary and 
Treasurer of Law Faculty, 102-5 Law Building, Baltimore, Md. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY. 
MARYLAND COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, 1841-1904. 

THE SEVENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL SESSION. 

FACULTY. 

Charles Caspari, Jr., Phar.D., Professor of Theoretical and Applied Pharmacy, Dean of the 
Faculty. 

David M. R. Culbreth, A.M., Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Materia Medica, Botany and Pharmacog- 
nosy. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Vegetable Histology. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D., Professor of Commercial Pharmacy and Store Practice. 

E. Frank Kelly, Phar.D., Professor of Galenical Pharmacy. 

Charles C. Plitt, Ph.G., Associate Piofessor of Materia Medica, Botany and Vegetable Histology. 

J. Carlton Wolf, Phar.D., Professor of Dispensing. 

Louis J. Burger, Ph.G., LL.B., Lecturer on Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 

George A. Stall, Phar.D., Demonstrator in Dispensing. 

Frontis Lentz, Phar.D., Demonstrator in Pharmacy. 

For catalogue and information, address, CHAS. CASPARI. Jr., Dean. 



INDEX 



Alumni Associations: 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 107 

University of Maryland 108 

University of Maryland Medical Depart- 
ment 107 

Annual Appointments 74 

Board of Instruction 3S 

Board of Regents 36 

Calendar 34 

Consolidation of Schools C2 

Curriculum 82 

Dispensaries 60 

Dispensary Staffs: 

Maryland General Hospital 55 

Mercy Hospital 54 

University Hospital 53 

Expenses, Students' 81 

Faculty of Physic 37 

Fees 79 

Graduates 61 

Hospitals: 

Franklin Square Hospital 66 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 68 

Maryland General Hospital 65 

Maryland Lying-in Asylum, The (Mater- 

nite) 66 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, The 66 

Maternity Hospital of the University of 

Maryland 66 

Mercy Hospital 64 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane 68 

Municipal Hospital 67 

Presbyterian Ear, Eye and Throat 

Charity Hospital, The 67 

Rosewood State Training School 69 

Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for 

the Insane, The 68 

Springfield State Hospital 69 

Spring Grove State Hospital 69 



St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 06 

University Hospital .» 08 

Laboratories: 

Anatomical 71 

Chemical 71 

Clinical Pathology 72 

Histology and Embryology 72 

Pathology and Bacteriology 72 

Physiology 72 

Physiological Chemistry 71 

Libraries 73 

Matriculates 57 

Museum 73 

Prizes 79 

Publications 74 

Requirements for Matriculation 75 

Rules 78 

Scholarships 86 

Staffs: 

City Hospital at Bay view 60 

James Lawrence Kernan Hospital 49 

Maryland General Hospital 47 

Maryland Lying-in Asylum (Maternite) 52 

Maryland Lying-in Hospital, The 52 

Mercy Hospital 44 

Nursery and Child's Hospital 51 

St. Vincent's Infant Asylum 52 

University Hospital 42 

Training School for Nurses: 

Maryland General Hospital 164 

Mercy Hospital 103 

University Hospital 101 

University Council 36 

University of Maryland: 
Department of Arts and Sciences (St. 

John's College) Ill 

Department of Dentistry 110 

Department of Law Ill 

Department of Pharmacy Ill 

Young Men's Christian Association 109 



112 



« HHHaMBBHH l_ HBI 





UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 



w 

_^5** 

fe - '^r, - - '" I'" Ii " ill 





MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL 



VOL. HI 



JULY; 1918 



NO. 2 



BULLETIN 



o* 



University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 



AND 



College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 




ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 
SESSION 1918-1919 



PUBLISHED SIX TIMES A YEAR 
FEBRUARY, APRIL, JUNE, JULY, OCTOBER AND DECEMBER 
LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



Entered as second-class matter Juno 16, 1916, at the Post Office at Baltimore. Md. 
• Act of Aur 




UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 




MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL 



BULLETIN 

OF THE 

University of Maryland School 
of Medicine 

AND 

College of Physicians and 
Surgeons 

Successor to The Hospital Bulletin, of the University of Maryland, 
Baltimore Medical College News, and the Journal of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Vol. Ill JULY, 1918 Xo. 2 



ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

SESSION 1918-1919 



CALENDAR 



1918-19 



June 1 to September 30. — Daily Clinics at University, Mercy, and 
Maryland General Hospitals. 

September 20. — Examination of Conditioned Students and Exami- 
nation for Advanced Standing. 

October 1. — Regular Session begins. 

November 26. — Thanksgiving Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

December 2. — Thanksgiving Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

December 21. — Christmas Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

January 2. — Christmas Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

February 22. — Washington's Birthday. 

April 16. — Easter Recess begins. 6 p.m. 

April 22. — Easter Recess ends. 9 a.m. 

June 2. — Commencement. 



M 



DEPARTMENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 



THE UNIVERSITY is represented by five departments, each 
having a distinct Faculty of Instruction. 

1st. The School of Liberal Arts at Annapolis, Md. St. 
John's College, Annapolis, Md., founded in 1696, has by affiliation 
become the Department of Arts and Sciences. The curriculum leads 
to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Science. 

2d. The School of Medicine in Baltimore, Md. The Univer-, 
sity of Maryland was established in Baltimore in 1807; The College 
of Physicians and Surgeons was established in Baltimore in 1872. 
The consolidated school offers a high grade course in medicine ex- 
tending over a period of four years, and leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. 

3d. The School of Law in Baltimore, Md. This school, founded 
in 1812 and reorganized in 1869, is designed by means of a course of 
study covering three years to qualify its students for the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws and for an intelligent practice of the Law. 

4th. The School of Dentistry in Baltimore, Md., was founded 
in 1882, and is designed to teach the art of dentistry as an integral 
part of the School of Medicine. The course of study leading to the 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery covers a period of four years. 

5th. The School of Pharmacy in Baltimore, Md., was estab- 
lished in 1841 as the Maryland College of Pharmacy, and affiliated 
with the School of Medicine in 1904. The course of study covers 
two years, and leads to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy. 

35 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

Thomas Fell, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., Provost 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., Robert Moss, Esq. 

LL.D. Samuel K. Merrick, M.D. 

Henry D. Harlan, LL.D. Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. 

L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. William L. Rawls, Esq. 

J. Holmes Smith, A.M., M.D. Randolph Barton, Jr., A.B., LL.B 

John C. Rose, LL.B., LL.D. Alfred S. Niles, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 

D. M. R. Culbreth, A.M., M.D. William F. Lockwood. M.D. 
John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D. 

LL.D. Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D. 

Daniel Base, Ph.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Henry P. Hynson, Phar.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

Henry Stockbridge, LL.D. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

T. O. Heatwole, M.D., D.D.S. Walter I. Dawkins, B.Prof., A.M. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL. 

The duty of this council is to formulate the scheme of studies to be pursued 
by students desiring both an academic and a professional or scientific degree 
and to act upon such other matters as may be brought before them. 

The Chancellor, 

HON. EMERSON C. HARRINGTON, 

Governor of Maryland. 

The Provost, 

THOMAS FELL, Ph.D., LL.D., D.C.L., 

President of St. John's College. 

J. B. RIPPERE, A.M., 

WALTER I. DAWKINS, B.Prof., A.M., 

For St. John's College. 

RANDOLPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

WM. F. LOCKWOOD, M.D., 

For School of Medicine. 

HENRY D. HARLAN, LL.D., 

HENRY STOCKBRIDGE, LL.D., 

For School of Law. 

T. 0. HEATWOLE, M.D., D.D.S., 

For School of Dentistry. 

DANIEL BASE, Ph.D. 

For School of Pharmacy. 

36 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



AND 



COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 



FACULTY OF PHYSIC. 

RAXDLOPH WINSLOW, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

L. E. XEALE, M.D., LL.D. 

J. HOLMES SMITH, A.M., M.D. 

JOHN C. HEMMETER, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

ARTHUR M. SHIPLEY, M.D. 

SAMUEL K. MERRICK, M.D. 

RIDGELY B. WARFIELD, M.D. 

GORDON WILSON, M.D. 

WILLIAM F. LOCKWOOD, M.D. 

GEORGE W. DOBBIN, A.B., M.D. 

WILLIAM ROYAL STOKES, M.D., Se.D. 

HARRY FRIEDENWALD, A.B., M.D. 

ARCHIBALD C. HARRISON, M.D. 

CARY B. GAMBLE, Jr., A.M., M.D. 

WILLIAM S. GARDNER, M.D. 

STANDISH McCLEARY, M.D. 

JULIUS FRIEDENWALD, A.M., M.D. 

J. M. H. ROWLAND, M.D. 

HIRAM WOODS, A.M., M.D. 

CHARLES E. SIMON, A.B., M.D. 

ALEXIUS McGLANNAN, A.M., M.D. 

37 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Surgery. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D., Professor of Obstetrics. 
J. Holmes Smith. A.M., M.D.. Professor of Anatomy. 

John C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine. 

* Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

Samuel K. Merrick, M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 

♦Gordon Wilson, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

Nathaniel G. Keirle, A.M., M.D., Sc.D., LL.D., Emeritus Professor of 
Medical Jurisprudence. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D., Professor of Medicine. 

George W. Dobbin, A.B., M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 

William Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Pathology and Bacteri- 
ology. 

Harry Friedenwald, A.B., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

* Archibald C. Harrison, M.D., Professor of Surgery. 
*Cary B. Gamble, Jr., A.M., M.D., Professor of Medicine. 
William S. Gardner, M.D., Professor of Gynecology. 
Standish McCleary, M.D., Professor of Pathology. 

Julius Friedenwald, A.M., M.D., Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. M. H. Rowland, M.D., Professor of Obstetrics and Dean of the Faculty. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D., Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Charles E. Simon, A.B., M.D., Professor of Physiological Chemistry and 
Clinical Pathology. 

Alexius McGlannan, A.M., M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery and Sur- 
gical Pathology. 

*John S. Ftlton, A.B., M.D., Professor of State Medicine. 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Thomas C. Gilchrist, M.R.C.S., L.S.A., M.D., Professor of Dermatology. 

* Frank Martin, B.S., M.D., Professor of Clinical and Operative Surgery. 
Charles G. Hill, A.M., M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

A. C. Pole, M.D., Emeritus Professor of Descriptive Anatomy. 

J. D. Blake, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine 
and Pediatrics. 

G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Rectum and 
Colon. 

W. B. Perry, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Tilghman, B. Marden, A.B., M.D., Professor of Histology and Embry- 
ology. 

J. Mason Hundley, M.D., Professor of Clinical Gynecology. 

Joseph T. Smith, M.D., Professor of Hygiene. 

38 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 39 

*R. Tuxstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D., Professor of Diseases of the Throat and 
Nose. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine and Physical Thera- 
peutics. 

Charles W. McElfresh, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

Edward N. Brush, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry. 

C. Hampson Jones, M.D., CM. (Edinburgh), M.D., Professor of Hygiene 
and Public Health. 

John Ruhrah, M.D., Pr ofessor of Pediatrics. 

Charles F. Blake, A.M., M.D., Professor of Proctology. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Throat and Nose. 

Bartgis McGlone, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology. 

G. Carroll Lockard, M.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

*Samuel J. Fort, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Pharmacology. 

Charles E. Brack, Ph.G., M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D., Sc.D., Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Roent- 
genology. 

•Andrew C. Gillis, A.M., M.D., Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Psychiatry. 

Joseph H. Branham, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Albert T. Chambers, M.D., Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Bernard Purcell Muse, M.D., Professor of Clinical Obstetrics. 

Wm. T. Watson, M.D., Professor of Therapeutics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

*Gideon Timberlake, Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

John G. Jay, M.D., Emeritus Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

*Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

*Page Edmunds, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

William Tarun, M.D., Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Walter D. Wise, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

*Edgar B. Friedenwald., M.D., Clinical Professor of Pediatries. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

♦Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D., Clinical Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

W. S. Smith, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gynecology. 

Joseph W. Holland, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery and Associate 
Professor of Anatomy. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B.,M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

Anton G. Rytina, A.B.,M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

E. B. Freeman, B.S., M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D., Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

T. Fred Leitz, M.D., Clinical Professor of Gastro-Enterology. 

J. W. Downey, M.D., Clinical Professor of Otology. 

*H. R. Spencer, M.D., Associate Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology. 



40 BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 

E. R. Strobel. A.B.. M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

W. B. Wolf, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

J. Clement Clark, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry. 

*Hugh Brent, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

Melvin Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Genito-Urinary Surgery 
and Dermatology. 

*Hubert C. Knapp, M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Abraham Samuels, Ph.G., M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology. 

William W. Requardt, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

George W. Mitchell, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of Throat and 
Nose. 

G. Howard White, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology. 

*Lewis J. Rosenthal, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

J. R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Dermatology. 
/C. C. Conser, M.D., Associate Professor of Physiology. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Path- 
ologist to University Hospital. 

J. Dawson Reeder, M.D., Associate Professor of Proctology. 

E. F. Kelly, Phar. D., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

*3. C. Blake, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Robert P. Bay, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

G. M. Settle, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Neurology and Clinical 
Medicine. 

H. Boyd Wylie, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology and Phys- 
iological Chemistry. 

C. C. W. Judd, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Medicine. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

*Thomas R. Chambers, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

*3arvey B. Stone, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Surgery. 

R. W. Locher, M.D., Associate Professor of Operative and Clinical Surgery, 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

Emil Novak, M.D., Associate Professor of Obstetrics. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Associate Professor of Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

S. Griffith Davis, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor of Anaesthesia. 

H. D. McCarthy, M.D., Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine. 

H. J. Walton, M.D., Associate Professor of Roentgenology. 

*Wm. H. Smith, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

*E. H. Hayward, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

J. L. Wright, M D., Associate in Anatomy and Histology. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

J. E. Poclton, M.D., Associate in Pediatrics. 

J. Percy Wade, M.D., Associate in Psychiatry. 

H. L. Sinskey, M.D., Associate in Materia Medica. 

R. C. Metzel, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Wilbur P. Stubbs, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

John E. O'Neill, M.D., Associate in Clinical Medicine. 

Geo. A. Strauss, Jr., M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 



BOARD OF INSTRUCTION 41 

H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

W. Milton Lewis, M.D., Associate in Clinical Pathology. 

Joseph I. Kemler, M.D., Associate in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

*F. K. Nichols, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Henry T. Collenberg, A.B., M.D., Associate in Physiology. 

Frank W. Hachtel, M.U., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D., Associate in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

George Murgatroyd, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Arthur G. Barrett, M.D., Associate in Surgery. 

H. S. Gorsuch, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

*J. Harry Ullrich, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

Wm. C. Stifler, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

Wm. Caspari, M.D., Associate in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

J. McF. Bergland, M.D., Associate in Obstetrics. 

R. G. Willse, M.D., Associate in Gynecology. 

Sam'l W. Moore, D.D.S., Associate in Anaesthesia. 

*C. A. Laubach, M.D., Associate in Pathology and Bacteriology. 

Albert Goldstein, M.D., Associate in Urology. 

Ernest H. Gaither, M.D., Associate in Gastro-Enterology. 

*B. M. Bernheim, A.B., M.D., Lecturer on Blood-Vessel Surgery. 

H. U. Todd, M.D., Demonstrator of Clinical Pathology. 

G. S. M. Kieffer, M.D., Demonstrator of Medicine. 

Harry M. Robinson, M.D., Demonstrator of Dermatology. 

*W. H. Daniels, M.D., Demonstrator of Orthopedic Surgery. 

*John Evans, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D., Instructor in Obstetrics. 

J. F. Hawkins, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

*W. K. White, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology. 

*L. H. Douglas, M.D., Instructor in Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

♦Edward A. Looper, M.D., D.Oph., Instructor in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

Ernest G. Marr, M.D., Instructor in Diseases of the Rectum and Colon. 

Benjamin Pushkin, M.D., Instructor in Neurology. 

*F. L. Jennings, M.D., Instructor in Surgery. 

*D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D., Instructor in Neurology and Clinical Psychiatry. 

J. V. Culverhouse, M.D., Instructor in Anaesthesia. 

*E. E. Mayer, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. 

*M. H. Todd. A.B.. M.D.. Instructor in Clinical Medicine 

*W. II. Anderson, M.D., Instructor in Pathology. 

*A. M. Evans, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

Theodore Morrison, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

E. P. Smith, M.D., Assistant in Operative Surgery. 

Harris Goldman, M.D., Instructor in Urology. >• 

George McLean, M.D., Instructor in Medicine. / 

L. P. O'Donnell, M.D., Instructor in Roentgenology. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D., Assistant in Gynecology. 

J. E. Brumback, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 



42 UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 

J. D. Bubert, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 

John S. Fenby, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

*C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

J. G. Stiefel, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

R. D. West, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology and Otology. 

*M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D., Assistant in Diseases of the Throat and Nose. 

*E. Le Compte Cook, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

*Frank J. Powers, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

*J. W. V. Clift, M.D., Assistant in Medicine. 

\Y.\i. B. Schapiro, M.D., Assistant in Obstetrics. 

*M. Feldman, M.D., Assistant in Gastro-Enterology. 

Geo. F. Lynch, M.D., Assistant in Orthopedic Surgery. 

*D. C. Streett, A.B., M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

*S. D. Shannon, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

C. C. Habliston, M.D., Assistant in Clinical Medicine. 

*C. R. Douthirt, M.D., Assistant in Bacteriology. 

A. L. Fehsenfeld, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., Assistant in Neurology. 

John Houff, M.D., Assistant in Pediatrics. 

R. C. Harley, M.D., Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

William J. Schmitz, M.D., Assistant in Surgery. 



*In military service. 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Attending Surgeons. 

Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. J. W. Holland, M.D. 

Ridgely B. Warfield, M.D. R. P. Bay, M.D. 

Attending Physicians. 

John C. Hemmeter, Ph.D., M.D. Charles W. McElfresh, M.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. G. Carroll Lockard, M.D. 

J. M. Craighill, M.D. Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D. 

Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Attending Gynecologists. 
J. Mason Hundley, M.D. Hugh Brent, M.D. W. P. Perry, M.D- 

Attending Obstetricians. 
L. E. Neale, M.D., LL.D. J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. 

Attending Ophthalmologists. 

Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. William Tartjn, M.D. 

Edward A. Looper, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL STAFF 43 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Samuel K. Merrick, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. J. Dawson Reeder, M.D. 

Attending Orthopedic Surgeons. 
R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Genito-Urinary Surgeons. 

Gideon Timberlake, M.D. Page Edmunds, M.D. 

A. J. Underhill, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pediatrician. 
Charles L. Summers, M.D. 

Attending Pathologists. 

Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 

H. J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Roentgenologists. 
H. J. Walton, M.D. L. P. O'Donnell, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 
Harry Schnuck, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

R. C. Deliz, M.D. S. B. Forbes, M.D. 

J. S. McDowell, M.D. C. A. Hart, M.D. 

N. G. Frost, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF. 
SURGICAL DIVISION. 

Surgeons. 

Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Associate Surgeons. 

Harvey B. Stone, M.D. William W. Reouardt, M.D. 

Elliott H. Hutchins, M.D. Walter D. Wise, M.D. 

Alfred Ullman, M.D. Thos. R. Chambers, M.D. 



44 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

Ophthalmologist and Otologist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 
Frank D. Sanger, M.D. 

Associate Rhinologist and Laryngologist. 
George W. Mitchell, M.D. 

Proctologist. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Urologist. 
A. G. Rytina, M.D. 



MEDICAL DIVISION. 

Physicians. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. Cary B. Gamble, Jr., M.D. 

Standish McCleary, M.D. 

Associate Physicians. 

Harvey G. Beck, M.D. Hubert C. Knapp, M.D. 

C. C. W. Judd, M.D. Louis J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

Gastro-Enterologist. 
Julius Friedenwald, M.D. 

Associate Gastro-Enterologist. 
T. Fredk. Leitz, M.D. 

Podiatrists, 

John Ruhrah, M.D. Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D 

Harry Goldberg, M.D. 

Neurologist, 
Andrew C. Gillis, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
Melvin Rosenthal, M.D. 



MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 45 

OBSTETRICAL DIVISION. 

Obstetrician. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. 

Associate Obstetricians. 

Charles E. Brack, M.D. Emil Novak, M.D. 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 



GYNECOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Gynecologist. 

William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Associate Gynecologists. 

Abraham Samuels, M.D. George Strauss, M.D. 



PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Pathologists. 
William Royal Stokes, M.D. Standish McCleary, M.D. 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGICAL DIVISION. 

Clinical Pathologist. 
H. T. Collenberg, M.D. 



DEPARTMENT OF OTO-NEUROLOGY. 
J. W. Downby, Jr., M.D. 



X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographer. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Attittant Radiographer. 
Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 



46 MERCY HOSPITAL STAFF 

HOSPITAL COMMITTEE. 

William F. Lockwood, M.D. William S. Gardner, M.D. 

Chairman. Secretary 

Harry Friedenwald, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 

Resident Surgeons. 

Z. R. Morgan, M.D. C. W. Robles, M.D. 

Everard Briscoe, M.D. 

Resident Physicians. 
J. L. Brown, M.D. Jos. Sindler, M.D. 

Resident Gynecologist. 

I. 0. RlDGELY, M.D. 

Accident Service. 
A. J. Fazenbaker, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF. 

VISITING STAFF. 

Surgeons. 

John D. Blake, M.D. Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Ridgbly B. Warfield, M.D. Arthur M. Shipley, M.D. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. 

Associates. 

J. C. Lumpkin, M.D. A. G. Barrett, M.D. 

H. C. Blakb, M.D. Nathan Winslow, A.M., M.D. 

J. B. Culverhousb, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 47 

Physicians. 

E. B. Freeman, M.D. Charles O'Donovan, A.M., M.D., LL.D. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D. Jno. C. Hemmeter, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D 

Harry Adler, A.B., M.D. J. M. Craiqhill, M.D. 
Jos. E. Gichner, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. J. W. Clift, M.D. 

Frank J. Powers, M.D. 

Neurologists. 
Chas. G. Hill, A.M., M.D. Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Associates. 
J. Clement Clark, M.D. J. Percy Wade, M.D. 

Laryngologists. 
S. K. Merrick, M.D. John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. 

Obstetricians, 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Nealb, M.D., LL.D. 

Associates. 

J. K. B. Seegar, M.D. Stanley H. Gorsuch, M.D. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 
W. B. Perry, M.D. J. Mason Hundley, M.D. 

Associates. 

S. H. Streett, B.S., M.D. Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

J. M. Fenton, M.D. E. H. Hayward, M.D. 

Ophthalmologists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Hiram Woods, A.M., M.D. 

Associates. 
Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. R. D. West, M.D. 



48 MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL STAFF 

Proctologists. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Associate. 
Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 

Radiologist. 
John Evans, M.D. 

Dermatologist. 
E. R. Stroebel, A.B., M.D. 

Urologist. 
W. B. Wolf, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgeon. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. 

Pathologists. 
Wm. Royal Stokes, M.D., Sc.D. Standish McGleary, M.D. 

G. Howard White, M.D. H. B. Wylie M.D. 



RESIDENT STAFF. 

Fred. H. Clark, M.D., Medical Superintendent. 

W. B. D alton, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

J. J. Giesen, M.D., Resident Physician. 

E. J. Carlin, M.D., Resident Obstetrician. 






KERNAN HOSPITAL STAFF 49 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Associate Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.B., M.D. Albertus Cotton, A.M., M.D. 

COMPTON RlELY, M.D. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D., Dispensary Surgeon and Anaesthetist. 

C. Reid Edwards, M.D., Assistant Surgeon and Superintendent. 

George F. Lynch, M.D., Resident Surgeon. 

Miss Anita Renshaw Presstman, Instructor in Corrective Gymnastic* 

Miss Mary H. Lee, Principal of School. 

Miss Ada Mosby, Kinder gartner and Industrial Teacher 

Roentgenologist. 
Henry J. Walton, M.D. 

Attending Plastic Surgeon. 
Jchn Staige Davis, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Physician. 
A. D. Atkinson, M.D. 

Attending Surgeon. 
Frank Martin, B.Sc, M.D. 

Attending Laryngologists. 
John R. Winslow, A.B., M.D. Richard H. Johnston, M.D. 

Attending Dermatologist. 
John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D. 

Attending Pathologist. 
Howard J. Maldeis, M.D. 

Attending Urologist. 
Gideon Timberlake. M.D 






50 BAYVIEW HOSPITAL STAFF 

Attending OculUt and Aurist. 
William Tarun, M.D. 

Attending Neurologist. 
Irving J. Spear, M.D. 

Attending Dentist. 
G. E. P. Truitt, D.D.S. 

Consulting Surgeons. 

W. S. Halsted, A.B., LL.D., B.Sc, M.D. J. M. T. Finney, A.B., M.D. 
Randolph Winslow, A.M., M.D., LL.D. Archibald C. Harrison, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 

Thomas R. Brown, A.B., M.D. Llewellys F. Barker, A.B., M.D. 

Thomas B. Futcher, A.B., M.D. William S. Thayer, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Oculist. 
Hiram Woods, A.B., M.D. 

Consulting Laryngologist. 
John N. Mackenzie, A.B., M.D. 



STAFF OF THE CITY HOSPITAL AT BAYVIEW. 

Thomas R. Boggs, S.B., M.D., Physician-in-Chief. 

Arthur M. Shipley, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief. 

Gordon Wilson, M.D., Physician-in-Chief to the Municipal Hospital for 

Tuberculosis. 

Admont Clark, M.D., Pathologist. 

Thomas P. Sprunt, M.D., Acting Physician-in-Chief. 

Frank S. Lynn, M.D., Acting Surgeon-in-Chief. 



CONSULTING STAFF. 

Ophthalmologist. 
Jambs J. Mills, M.D. 



NURSERY ANL CHILD'S HOSPITAL 8TAFT 51 

Otologist. 

William Tarun, M.D. 

Gynecologists. 

Edward H. Richardson, M.D. Hum: W. Brent, M.D. 

Uro 1 agists. 
Gideon- M. Timberlake, M.D. John T. G t RA<;nTY, M.D. 

Laryngologist. 
Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

Pediatrician. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
Henrt M. Thomas, M.D. 



ST. ELIZABETH HOME. 

Attending Physician. 

Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D 

Frank Ayd, M.D. 

Surgeon. 
Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Neurologist. 
A. C. Gillis, M.D. 



STAFF OF NURSERY AND CHILD'S HOSPITAL. 

Attending Physicians. 
Edgar B. Friedenwald, M.D. Harry Goldberg, M.D. 

Consulting Physicians. 
John Ruhrah, M.D. Wm. S. Baer, M.D. Wm. F. Lociwood, M.D 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. 

Oculist and Aurist. 
Harry Friedenwald, M.D. 

Superintendent. 
Mrs. O. V. Jones. 



52 MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL STAFF 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

Visiting Physicians. 

Charles O'Donovan A.M., M.D. Eugene H. Hatward, M.D. 

J. E. Poulton, M.D. J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. 

F. J. Powers, M.D. L. C. M. Parker, M.D. 

Visiting Surgeons. 

Frank Martin, B.S., M.D. John D. Blake, M.D. 

R. B. Warfield, M.D. Alexius McGlannan, M.D. 

Visiting Oculists and Aurists. 
J. Frank Crouch, M.D. Clyde E. Clapp, M.D. 

Visiting Orthopedic Surgeons. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. Compton Riely, M.D. 

Visiting Proctologist. 
G. Milton Linthicum, A.M., M.D. 

Pathologist. 
Sydney M. Cone, A.M., M.D. 

Resident Interne. 
W. H. Ingram. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM (MATERNITE) 

Visiting Obstetricians. 

George W. Dobbin, M.D. Charles E. Brack, M.D. 

Maurice Lazenby, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Carl C. Nohe, M.D. 



MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

Obstetricians. 
J. M. H. Rowland, M.D. L. E. Nbalb, M.D. 

Associates. 

J. K. B. E. Seegar, M.D. H. S. Gorsuch, M.D. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

Resident Obstetrician. 
Edward J. Carlin, M.D. 



UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 53 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 
J. A. Skladowsky, M.D., Dispensary Physician. 

Medicine. 

S. R. Clarke, M.D. M. S. Schimmel, M.D 

R. C. Metzel, M.D. E. L. Cook, M.D. 

Eugene Kerr, M.D. Horace Byers, M.D. 

Surgery. 

R. P. Bay, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
Frank S. Lynn. M.D., Associate Chief of Clinic. 
T. L. Phillips, M.D. Charles R. Edwards, M.D. 

E. S. Perkins, M.D. H. M. Foster, M.D. 

Pediatrics. 

Charles L. Summers, M.D., Professor of Clinical Pediatrics. 

J. S. Fenby, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

John Houff, M.D. C L. Joslin, M.D. 

Norbert C. Nitsch, M.D. 

Gynecology. 

W. K. White, M.D. R. G. Willse, M.D. 

R. L. Mitchell, M.D. L. H. Douglas, M.D. 

J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. D. Silberman, M.D. 

Eye and Ear. 

Wm. Tarun, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
E. A. Looper, M.D. R. C. Harley, M.D. 

G. MURGATROYD, M.D. 

Skin. 

John R. Abercrombie, A.B., M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
H. M. Robinson, M.D. 

Stomach. 
Ernest H. Gaither, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 

H. C. Davis, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 
M. L. Lichtenberg, M.D. E. G. Breeding, M.D. 

Orthopedics. 

R. Tunstall Taylor, A.B., M.D., Professor of Orthopedic Surgery. 

Compton Riely, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Daniels, M.D. 



54 MERCY HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STATP 

Genito-Urinary. 

Gidjcon Timberlake, M.D., Clinical Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases. 

A. J. Underhill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

W. H. Councill, M.D. 

Neurology. 

Irving J. Spear, M.D., Professor of Neurology. 

G. M. Settle, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

B. Pushkin, M.D. J. A. Skladowsky, M.D. 

Proctology. 

G. Milton Linthictjm, M.D., Professor of Diseases of Rectum and Colon. 
J. D. Reeder, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Tuberculosis. 
J. E. O'Neill, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Obstetrics. 

L. H. Douglass, M.D., Chief of Clinic. 

Wm. B. ScHAPifto, M.D. 

H. N. Freeman, M.D. 

X-Ray Department. 

Henry J. Walton, M.D., Roentgenologist. 
Lewis P. O'Donnell, M.D. 

Miss Frances Meredith, Chief Nurse, Out-Patient Department. 



DISPENSARY STAFF OF MERCY HOSPITAL. 

Physician in Charge. 

B. S. Hanna, M.D. 

Surgery. 
A. C. Harrison, M.D. T. R. Chambers, M.D. 

E. H. Hutchins, M.D. F. L. Jennings, M.D. 

A. M. Evans. M.D. A. F. Hutchins, M.D. 

W. W. Requardt, M.D. 

Genito-Urinary Surgery. 

Anton G. Rytina, M.D. 
Wm. J. Todd, M.D. A. E. Goldstbin, M.D. 

A. L. Tumbleson, M.D. Harris Goldman, M.D. 

Orthopedic Surgery. 
Albertus Cotton, M.D. Harry L. Rogers, M.D. 

Medicine. 

B. S. Hanna, M.D. L. J. Rosenthal, M.D. 

A. C. Sorenson, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 55 

Diseases of Stomach. 

Julius Friedbnwald, M.D. John G. Stiefbl, M.D. 

T. Frbd'k Lbitz, M.D. Thbodorb Morrison, M.D- 

L. A. M. Krause, M.D. 

Nervous Diseases. 

A. C. Gillis, M.D. D. D. V. Stuart, Jr., M.D. 

G. F. Sargent, M.D. G. B. Wolfe, M.D. 

Otto H. Duker, M.D. J. W. V. Clift, M.D. 

Diseases of Children. 

C. L. Joslin, M.D. 

F. N. Hillis, M.D. Frank Ayd, M.D. 

Diseases of Women. 
W. S. Gardner, M.D. J. G. Onnen, M.D. 

A. Samuels, M.D. C. F. J. Couqhlin, M.D. 

Diseases of Nose and Throat. 

Frank Dyer Sanger, M.D. 

G. W. Mitchell, M.D. W. F. Zinn, M.D 

Diseases of Bye and Bar. 

Harry Friedbnwald, M.D. 
H. K. Fleckenstein, M.D. Jos. I. Kemler, M.D. 

N euro-Otology. 
J. W. Downey, Jr., M.D. 

Diseases of the Rectum. 
C. F. Blake, M.D. 

Diseases of Skin. 
Mblvin Rosenthal, M.D B. V. Kblly, M.D. 



MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF. 

Committee in Charge. 

Wm. Caspari, M.D., Chairman. G. M. Linthicum, M.D. 

A. G. Barrett, M.D. 

Medicine and Children. 
Charles O'Donovan, M.D. H. D. McCarty, M.D. 



56 MARYLAND QBNSBAL HOSPITAL DISPENSARY STAFF 

Surgery. 

Arthur G. Barrett, M.D. J. D. Bubbrt, M.D. 

George Shannon, M.D. 

Eye and Ear. 

Clyde A. Clapp, M.D. Reginald D. West, M.D. 

J. E. Brumback, M.D. 

Nose and Throat. 
George W. Murgatroyd, M.D. Wm. Caspari, M.D. 

G astro-Enter ology and Proctology. 
E. B. Freeman, M.D. Ernest G. Marr, M.D. 

Urology. 
R. B. Kenyon, M.D. E. H. K. Zeller, M.D. 

Gynecology. 
W. B. Perry, M.D. J. M. Fenton, M.D. 

J. M. Denny, M.D 

Dermatology. 
R. B. Kenyon, M.D. E. H. K. Zeller, M.D. 

Neurology. 

George M. Settle M.D. A. C. Gillis, M.D. 

Irving C. Spear, M.D. 



MATRICULATES, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE OF 
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

1917-1918. 



POST-GRADUATES AND SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Name State 

Davis, Emily Havilaxd,. B.A Maryland 

Dickersox, John D., M.D Maryland 

Dunn, John J Man/land 

Eichhorn, Oscar Julics, A.B Maryland 

Ewing, Clinton Leroy Maryland 

Gamble, John Reeves, M.D Maryland 

Hollister, William, B.S North Carolina 

Kelly, Mary Loretta Maryland 



Name State 

McPherson, Paul Vestal North Carolina 

O'Doxxell, Loins P., M.D Florida 

Parker, James R., M.D North Carolina 

Pixquard, Joseph, M.D Tennessee 

Quillen, Emile P., M.D North Carolina 

Scheurich, John A., A.B Maryland 

Suzuki, Yoshio, M.D Japan 

Weamer, J. A., M.D Pennsylvania 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Allen, Eustace Andrew, A.B Alabama 

Anderson, La ng W South Carolina 

Bonner, John Bryan Norht Carolina 

Borror, William Bruce West Virginia 

Briscoe, Everarb Maryland 

Bross, Samuel I Maryland 

Brown, Joseph Lucien Alabama 

Cafritz, Edward A District of Columbia 

Carlin, Ed wa rd J New Jersey 

Clark, Harold C New York 

Cooke, G. Carlyle North Carolina 

Coulon, Frank N New Ha mpshire 

Dalton, William B North Carolina 

Darby, William Arthur Maryland 

Deliz, Ramon C Porto Rico 

Diebolder, Oscar A Mar 

Ephraim, Myer Maryland 

Fazenbaker, Anderson Johnson.. Maryland 

Forbes, Sherman Balch Florida 

Frost, Nugent George Massachusetts 

Gavroxsky, Samuel New Jersey 

Giesex, Joiix Jacob, A.B V 

Gore, Michael Alvord, A.B. 

District of Columbia 

Grove, George Hedges Maryland 

Hart, Crawford Avery, A. B.. North Ca 
Howell, James Edward, B.S. North Carolina 

Huxter, Dewitt T North Carolina 

Joiixsox, ELarley Moxroe ^outh Carolina 

Joyxer, James C North Carolina 

Kellam, John- Wise Virginia 

Kocevar, Martix Fraxcts Pennsyl 

Lynch, Raymoxd Addison West Virginia 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



iVome State 

McDade, Brodie Banks North Carolina 

McDowell, John Stafford New York 

Macke, Clarence E Maryla rd 

* Mellor, Royal Benjamin Maryland 

* Michael, Marion Harlan Maryland 

Morgan, Jr., Zachariah Raphael.. Maryland 

Xicklas, John Michael Maryland 

Putterman, Morris Nathan Maryland 

Reyxolds, Paul E Maryland 

Ridgely, Irwix Oliver, A.B Maryland 

Robles, Charles Walter Florida 

Rousseau, James Parks North Carolina 

Sabistox, Fraxk North Carolina 

ScHAEFER, JOHX WlLLIAM, B.S. 

District of Columbia 

Seal, Gratta Earle West Virginia 

Shaffer, Stewart Seibert Pennsylvania 

Shaver, William T North Carolina 

Sixdler, Joseph Maryland 

Sledge, Robert Franklin, B.S. 

North Carolina 

Speake, Thomas Carlyle, A.B Maryland 

Spoox, Jr., Samuel Clarexce North Carolina 

st, Alfred Nortox Connecticut 

Taylor, Joseph Russell Pennsylvania 

Thom. - >DORE F New Jersey 

Thoxer, John George: West Virginia 

Tierxey, Edward Fran :- Rhode I 

Trippett, Jr., IIarrisox, A.B. 

'■'irginia 

Warlick, Henry C North Carolina 

Whitf. '''...South Carolina 

61 



58 



MATRICULATES 1917-1918 



THIRD YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Adams, Edgar Paul Maryland 

Abbott, Lymax Sinclair Missouri 

Alagia, Damiax Paul Maryland 

Barker, Frank T Florida 

Boone, Jr., Walter South Carolina 

Brown, Jr., James North Carolina 

Bcchness, John Adam Maryland 

Cregg, Herbert A Massachusetts 

Datis, Charles W., A.B North Carolina 

Datis, John Edward Virginia 

Deaktne, Walter Clifton Delaware 

Dte, Frank Ganes New York 

Flippin, Eugene Littlejohn. North Carolina 

Fort, Wetherbee Maryland 

Franceschi, Francisco Porto Rico 

Geter, William * G Maryland 

Goldsborough, Charles Reubell, A.B. , A.M. 

Maryland 
Hartenstein, Albert G., Ph. C,West Virginia 

Helsabeck, Chester J North Carolina 

Horine, Cyrus Flook Maryland 

Ingram, W. Hawkins Maryland 

Jacobowitz, Aaron Pennsylvania 

John, Baxter Schooley Virginia 

LaRue, Raymond T Ohio 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name State 

Lonergan, Paul B Pennsylvania 

Lumpkin, Morgan LeRoy, Ph. B... .Maryland 

McElwain, Howard B Pennsylvania 

McLeod, Walter Guy North Carolina 

Macis, Salvador Albanes, A.B., B.S. 

Nicaragua 

Mayoral, Jr., Joaquin Spain 

Miller, Daniel Maryland 

Morales, Pablo Otero Porto Rico 

Owens, William Duncan Georgia 

Phillips, Lawrence D West Virginia 

Pittmax, Henry Lee North Carolina 

Reynolds, Roy Rex Virginia 

Richards, Charles William Victor, B.A. 

Maryland 

Romine, Carl Chester West Virginia 

Stewart, Charles Wilbur Maryland 

* Timko, Louis M Pennsylvania 

Tiemeyer, Arthur Charles Maryland 

Tull, Myron G., A.B Maryland 

Vazquez, Rafael S Porto Rico 

Whitted, Walter Puryear North Carolina 

Wild, Albert. Connecticut 

Wright, Harold E New York 



SECOND YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Artigiani, Philibert, Phar. D Maryland 

Aubrey, John Forsyth Maryland 

Banvard, Navy Francis Xavier 

New Jersey 

Bernabe, Adolfo Porto Rico 

Billingslea, Charles Levixe Maryland 

Broadrup, Earl Edgar Maryland 

* Broll, Harry R .Maryland 

Brumback, Lyxn Hamilton Virginia 

Bubert, Howard M Maryland 

Burton, Claud Carter, B.S Kentucky 

de Cardoxa, Nestor Porto Rico 

Castro, Andres Gutierrez, B.A.. Costa Rica 

Clarken, Joseph A New Jersey 

Comas, Alfredo Calero Cuba 

Dobihal, Louis Charles Maryla?id 

Erwin, John Joseph West Virginia 

Fahxdrich, Carl Gustav Maryland 

Finney, Roy Pelham Virginia 

Fleck, Rolaxd F Pennsylvania 

Gixsburg, Leox Maryland 

Gleason, Joseph Henry Massachusetts 

Goxzalvo, Francisco Antonio 

Santo Domingo 

Hakim, Rattansha Merwanji India 

Holden, Frederick Allen Maryland 



Name State 

Hooper, Zebulon Vance North Carolina 

Jackvoxy, Albert H., Ph.G., Ph.C, Phar.D. 

Rhode Island 

Jaxer, Axgel Porto Rico 

Kaufman, Edward L West Virginia 

Kinney, James P New York 

Kexure, James T., B.S Connecticut 

Kxotts, Earle Paul, B.S Maryland 

Kourey, Salem W Maryland 

Lombard, Nicholas Thomas, Phar.D. 

Marj/land 

Lueders, Jr., William Maryland 

McGill, Waldo Kxox, A.B South Carolina 

Mallet, Victor Joseph New York 

Martin, William Fraxcis North Carolina 

Marshall, Charles Benton West Virginia 

Med airy, George Curtis Maryland 

Metcalf, John William Ohio 

Navarro, Armando Silva Porto Rico 

Orr, William Jennings Bryan 

North Carolina 

Perry, Clayton Charles Pennsylvania 

Pessagxo, Daxiel J., A.B Maryland 

Pugh, James Clyde Ohio 

Ponte, Jr., Joseph Perry Massachusetts 

de Quevedo, Rafael Garcia Porto Rico 



MATRICULATES 1917-1918 



50 



Name State 

Quintero, Ernesto Porto Rico 

Reddington, Lawrence Joseph Maryland 

Reese, John Gottlieb Morris Maryland 

Richardson, Ray Walters Maryland 

*Rigney, Jr., Lawrence J Delaware 

Schoenheit, Edward William North Carolina 

Sheppard, Jr., Henry North Carolina 

Skaggs, James W West Virginia 

Smith, Frederick Bruce Maryland 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name ^tate 

Tolson, Howard Lee, Jr Maryland 

Ward, Edwin Janvier Maryland 

White, Thomas Francis Delaware 

Warren, John Freeman New York 

Wilson, Harold Lee, A.B Delaware 

Wissig, George L Maryland 

Woodruff, Julian S North Carolina 

Zinberg, Israel Saul Maryland 

64 



FIRST YEAR CLASS. 



Name State 

Austerlitz, John S., Phar.D Maryland 

* Bacon, Charles Albert Maryland 

Badagliacca, Francis Lucian New Jersey 

Barnes, Bruce New Jersey 

Benson, Carl Fisher Maryland 

* Bentz, Felix John Connecticut 

Bernardo, John Ralph Delaware 

Bolewicki, Peter Edward, A.B Maryland 

Bonfiglio, Vincent Maryland 

Bose, Jogesh Chandra India 

* Bowers, Jr., Thaddeus Ray 

North Carolina 
•Brown, Harold Vardell... North Carolina 

Butler, Joseph Charles Pennsylvania 

Costa, Oscar Guillermo Porto Rico 

Culver, Samuel H .Delaware 

* Dean, Dawson F Ohio 

Decker, Walter Joseph Pennsylvania 

Evans, Arnold Lunda, B.S Kentucky 

Fisher, C. Fred West Virginia 

Fisher, Daniel Sebastian Pennsylvania 

Foley, Charles J Maryland 

Foreman, Tom Alexander... North Carolina 

Franklin, Joseph Powell, A.B Alabama 

Freedom, Leon Maryland 

Fulton, William James Maryland 

Golley, Kyle Wood Maryland 

Grabill, John Stanley Maryland 

* Grempler, Karl F Maryland 

Guyton, John Willis Maryland 

Hardman, Carney West Virginia 

Hawks, Cyrus Eugene Virginia 

Henneberger, Cyril Russell Maryland 

Holofcener, Julius David Maryland 

Isear, Milton Roderick South Carolina 

Jaffe, Albert Maryland 

Johns, J. Carroll Maryland 

Joska, Vincent Vernon Maryland 

Joyner, George Richardson Virginia 

Keegan, Daniel Francis, A. B.. .Massachusetts 

Kemp, Richard Joseph Maryland 

Kwilinski, Teofil Stanislaus New Jersey 

McCoy, Arley Von, A.B West Virginia 

* McCoy, Cecil Glen, A.B West Virginia 



Name State 

Martinez, Ezequiel Porto Rico 

Matthews, Stanley Willi am... Xorth Carolina 
Matthews, Jr., William Edward.. .Maryland 

Melendez, Juan Santiago Porto Rico 

Mercier, Albin Scott, A.B Maryland 

Millan, Lyle Jordan Virginia 

Moxxinger, Arthur Ceril Pennsylvania 

Monserrat, Antonio Porto Rico 

* Morris, Byron McNeely Pennsylvania 

Nash, Alexander Edgar Connecticut 

* Nazario, Lorenzo Porto Rico 

O'Rourk, Thomas Rutter Maryland 

Pacienzo, Frank Anthony Maryland 

Paulson, Moses Maryland 

Peters, Edgar Allen Poe, B.S Kentucky 

Pillsbury, Harold Crockett Maryland 

Plyler, Ralph Johnson, A.B. North Carolina 

Pokorny, Joseph Maryland 

Quinones, Norbert A Porto Rico 

Reese, Harry Randolph Virginia 

Ries, Ferdinand A Maryland 

Robinson, Wilfred John Connecticut 

Romilly, Harold A Virginia 

Rosario, Pedro Porto Rico 

Rudisill, John David, A.B... . North Carolina 

Ryon, James Barry, A.B Maryland 

Sabin, Fred C New York 

Saporito, Archibald Richard. . . .New Jersey 

Savage, Philip Joseph Connecticut 

Schilling, Jesmond William Pennsylvania 

Scotellaro, Nicholas J New York 

Seay, Thomas Walter Virginia 

Shannan, George Edmon Maryland 

Sherman, Solomon Maryland 

Shircliff, Elliott Walter Maryland 

Shubert, Felix S Pennsylvania 

Stein, Nathan New York 

Stone, Saul G Ohio. 

Sullivan, Edmund John Joseph Maryland 

Szczerbicki, John Valentine Maryland 

Tilghman, Stanley James Maryland 

Trattner, Norman Frey, A.B. 

Pennsylvania 
Wangler, Herman Ernest New York 



60 



MATRICULATES 1917-1918 



Nam* State 

Weinberg, Edwin David, A.B Maryland 

Wells, George Edward Maryland 

Wiest, Paul Foreman West Virginia 

Williams, Mortimer Harry Virginia 

Wilkerson, James Herbert Maryland 

* Not in attendance the entire session. 



Name Stat* 

Wilson, W. Wellford, Phar. D.. ..Maryland 

W t olfe, James Clinton New Jersey 

* Wrenn, John Edwin Maryland 

Y eager, Leslie, A., B.S New York 

95 



GENERAL SUMMARY OF STUDENTS ATTENDING THE UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND, SESSION OF 1917-18. 

Department of Arts and Sciences (St. John's College) 211 

Department of Medicine 282 

Department of Law 256 

Department of Dentistry 215 

Department of Pharmacy 73 

Training Schools for Nurses 245 



Total 



1282 



GRADUATES UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND COLLEGE 

OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS, 

JUNE 1, 1918. 



Name State 

Anderson, Lang W South Carolina 

Bonner, John Bryan North Carolina 

Borror, William Bruce West Virginia 

Briscoe, Everard Maryland 

Bross, Samuel I Maryland 

Brown, Joseph Lucien Uabama 

Caeritz, Edward A District of Columbia 

Carlin, Edward J New Jersey 

Clark, Harold C New York 

Dalton, William B North Carolina 

Darby, William Arthur Maryland 

Deliz, Ramon C Porto Rico 

Diebolder, Oscar A Maryland 

Ephraim, Myer Maryland 

Fazenbaker, Anderson Johnson... Maryland 

Forbes, Sherman Balch Florida 

Frost, Nugent George Massachusetts 

Ga vronsky, Samuel New Jersey 

Giesen, John Jacob, A.B Virginia 

Gore, Michael Alvord, A.B. 

District of Columbia 

Grove, George Hedges Maryland 

Hart, Crawford Avery, A.B. 

North Carolina 
Hunter, Dewitt T North Carolina 



Name State 

Johnson, Harley Monroe South Carolina 

Joyner, James C North Carolina 

Kocevar, Martin Francis Pennsylvania 

McDade, Brodie Banks North Carolina 

McDowell, John Stafford New York 

Macke, Clarence E Maryland 

Morgan, Jr., Zachariah Raphael.. Maryland 

Nicklas, John Michael Maryland 

Putterman, Morris Nathan Maryland 

Ridgely, Irwin Oliver, A.B Maryland 

Robles, Charles Walter Florida 

Rousseau, James Parks North Carolina 

Sabiston, Frank North Carolina 

Seal, Gratta Earle West Virginia 

Sindler, Joseph Maryland 

Sledge, Robert Frankling, B.S. 

North Carolina 

Speake, Thomas Carlyle, A.B Maryland 

Spoon, Jr., Samuel Clarence North Carolina 

Sweet, Alfred Norton Connecticut 

Thompson, Theodore F New Jersey 

Trippett, Jr., Lemuel Harrison, A.B. 

West Virginia 

Warlick, Henry C North Carolina 

White, Samuel Howard, A.B. South Carolina 
46 



PRIZEMEN 



University Prize — Gold Medal Ramon C. Deliz 

Certificate of Honor Samuel Howard White 



GRADUATES OF JUNE 1, 1917, NOT INCLUDED IN PUBLISHED LIST 



M addison, Walter E Utah Wheaton, Harry W. 

Martin, John Willis Maryland 



New Yor}, 



61 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

AND 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND 
SURGEONS. 

UNITED IN 1915, AND HEREAFTER THE TWO SCHOOLS 
WILL BE CONDUCTED AS ONE. 

As*a result of the merger accomplished in 1915 the combined 
schools offer the student the abundant resources of both institutions, 
and, in addition, by earlier combination with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, the entire equipment of three large medical colleges. 

The School of Medicine of the University of Maryland is one of 
the oldest foundations for medical education in America, ranking 
fifth in point of age among the medical colleges of the United States. 
It was chartered in 1807, under the name of the College of Medicine 
of Maryland, and its first class was graduated in 1810. In 1812 
the College was empowered by the Legislature to annex three other 
colleges or faculties, of Divinity, of Law and of Arts and Sciences, 
and the four colleges thus united were "constituted an University 
by the name and under the title of the University of Maryland." 

Established thus for more than a century, the School of Medi- 
cine of the University of Maryland has always been a leading medi- 
cal college, especially prominent in the South and widely known 
and highly honored throughout the country. 

The beautiful college building at Lombard and Greene Streets, 
erected in 1814-1815, is the oldest structure in America devoted 
to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the first medical 
libraries and the first medical college library in the United States. 

Here for the first time in America dissecting was made a com- 
pulsory part of the curriculum; here instruction in Dentistry was 
first given (1837), and here were first installed independent chairs 
for the teaching of Diseases of Women and Children (1867) and of 
Eye and Ear Diseases (1873). 

The School of Medicine was one of the first to provide for 
adequate clinical instruction by the erection in 1823 of its own 

62 



clinioalJJfacilitibs 63 

hospital^ and in this hospital intra mural residency for the senior 
student was first established. 

In 1913 juncture was brought about with the Baltimore Medi- 
cal College, an institution of 32 years growth. By this association 
the facilities of the School of Medicine were enlarged in faculty, 
equipment and hospital connection. 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was incorporated under 
the Legislative enactment in 1872 and established on Hanover 
Street in a building afterwards known as the Maternity, the first 
obstetrical hospital in Maryland. In 1878 union was effected 
with the Washington University School of Medicine, in existence 
since 1827, and the College was removed to its present location 
at Calvert and Saratoga Streets. By this arrangement, medical 
control of the City Hospital, now the Mercy Hospital, was obtained, 
and on this foundation in 1899 the present admirable college build- 
ing was erected. 



CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES. 
UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL. 

The University Hospital, which is the property of the Faculty of 
Physic of the University of Maryland, is the oldest institution for 
the care of the sick in the State of Maryland. It was opened in 
September, 1823, under the name of the Baltimore Infirmary, and 
at that time consisted of but four wards, one of which was reserved 
for eye cases. By successive additions this hospital was increased 
to more than fourfold its original accommodations, there being added 
to it a large clinical amphitheater, a students' building for the accom- 
modation of the thirty clinical assistants, and a nurses' building 
for the accommodation of the pupils of the Training School for Nurses. 
The yearly increase in the number of patients seeking admission to 
the hospital, however, more than kept pace with the increase in ac- 
commodations, and the Faculty therefore erected an entirely new and 
modern hospital of fully double the capacity of the former building. 

The University Hospital is constructed of brick and Tennessee 
limestone in the Colonial style of architecture, fronting 175 feet upon 
Lombard Street, and about the same on Greene Street. It is supplied 
with the most modern and approved system of heating, ventilation, 



64 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

etc., and equipped with all modern requirements and conveniences 
for the care of the sick, and for the clinical instruction of the students 
of the University. 

It is one of the largest and finest hospitals owned and controlled 
by any medical school in America, and in point of architectural beauty, 
convenience and completeness of arrangements and equipment com- 
pares favorably with other hospitals. 

An important adjunct to the hospital is the postmortem build- 
ing, which is constructed with special reference to the instruction 
of students in pathological anatomy. 

The hospital is situated opposite the University building, so that 
the student loses no time in passing from the lecture halls to the 
clinical amphitheater. 

A portion of the hospital is used as a marine hospital for foreign 
seamen. The great importance of Baltimore as a shipping point 
brings into her harbor many vessels from all parts of the world, 
and the sick sailors who are cared for in the wards of the institution 
give the students an opportunity to observe a large variety of 
diseases. Another considerable portion of the building is used as a 
Municipal Hospital, and contains charity beds supported by the city 
of Baltimore. This department of the hospital is taxed to its utmost 
capacity to afford accommodations for the patients seeking admission. 

Owing to its location, being the nearest hospital to the largest 
manufacturing district of the city, the University Hospital receives 
for treatment a very large number of accident cases of all kinds, both 
slight and serious. These cases, as well as patients suffering from 
the various diseases of our own climate, occupy the beds, and add 
greatly to the facilities of clinical teaching enjoyed by the school. 
The facilities for clinical instruction have been greatly enlarged by 
an appropriation by the State of Maryland for the support of free 
beds for patients from the various counties. 

MERCY HOSPITAL. 

The Sisters of Mercy first assumed charge of the Hospital at the 
corner of Calvert and Saratoga streets, then owned by the Wash- 
ington University, in 1875. By the merger of 1878 the Hospital 
came under the control of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
but the Sisters continued their work of ministering to the patients. 

In a very few years it became apparent that the City Hospital, 
as it was then called, was much too small to accommodate the rapidly 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 65 

growing demands upon it. However, it was not until 1888 that the 
Sisters of Mercy with the assistance of the Faculty of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, were able to lay the corner stone of the 
present Hospital. This building was completed and occupied late, 
in 1889. Since then the growing demands for more space has com- 
pelled the erection of additions, until now there are accommodations 
for 351 patients. 

In 1909 the name was changed from The Baltimore City Hospital 
to Mercy Hospital. 

Mercy Hospital is located in the center of a city of 1 $00,000 
inhabitants and is under the exclusive medical control of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. It adjoins the College building and 
all surgical patients from the public wards are operated upon in the 
College operating rooms. This union of the Hospital and College 
buildings greatly facilitates the clinical teaching, as there is no time 
lost in passing from one to the other. 

Mercy Hospital is the hospital of the United Piailways and Electric 
Company of Baltimore City, and receives patients from the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company and from the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company and its branches. 

During the calendar year of 1917 there were treated in the wards 
of the Hospital 5,488 patients. That the emergency service is very 
large is shown by the fact that during this time 5,912 ambulant 
cases were treated in the accident department. In other out-patient 
departments there were treated 8,714 patients, making a total of 
31,343 ill or injured people who applied for treatment during one year. 

THE MARYLAND GENERAL HOSPITAL. 

The Maryland General Hospital, situated at Madison Street and 
Linden Avenue, has a capacity of 175 beds, and furnishes a large 
amount of clinical material, which is under the control of the Faculty 
of Physic for teaching purposes. 

A new operating suite has just been completed, modern in every 
particular and adapted to the teaching of small sections of students. 
The Hospital has been remodeled throughout and new wards added 
at a cost of $50,000. The hospital treated during the last calendar 
year 2744 patients in the ward and 9980 outdoor patients. One 
thousand five hundred and twenty-five surgical operations were 
performed. 

The hospital receives appropriations from the State of Maryland 
and the City of Baltimore for the support of charity cases. 



66 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

FRANKLIN SQUARE HOSPITAL. 

The Franklin Square Hospital has a capacity of 100 beds. Dur- 
ing the year ending December 31, 1917, 1558 cases were treated in 
the hospital, and 2158 patients were treated in the dispensary. 
Eight hundred and ninety-eight surgical operations were performed, 
in the hospital. 

LYING-IN HOSPITALS. 

MATERNITY HOSPITAL OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. 

This institution is also the property of the Faculty of Physic and 
under its exclusive control and direction, and is conducted with the 
special purpose of furnishing actual obstetrical experience to each 
member of the graduating class. 

New accommodations have been provided in the general hospital, 
and the Maternit}' Department now offers better facilities than 
ever before, while the large increase in clinical material has made it 
possible to offer excellent opportunities for post-graduate work. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN HOSPITAL. 

This hospital adjoins the Maryland General Hospital and fur- 
nishes an abundance of clinical material, which is under the control 
of the Faculty of Physic. 

MARYLAND LYING-IN ASYLUM. 

This hospital was established by the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in 1874. It is the pioneer institution of its kind in the 
State of Marjdand and one of the first in the country. 

THE WEST END MATERNITY. 

The West End Maternity adjoins the Franklin Square Hospital 
and furnishes an abundance of clinical material, which is under the 
control of the Faculty of Physic. 

OUT-PATIENT CLINIC AND DISPENSARY. 

In connection with the University Hospital an out-door obstetri- 
cal clinic is conducted, in which every case has careful prenatal 
supervision, is attended during labor by a graduate physician and 



CLINICAL FACILITIES 67 

graduate nurse — one senior student also being present — and is 
visited during the puerperium by the attending student and gradu- 
ate nurse. Careful prenatal, labor and puerperal records are kept, 
making this work of extreme value to the medical student, not only 
from the obstetrical standpoint, but in making him appreciate the 
value of social service and public health work. 

NUMBER OF PATIENTS. 

During the year ending December 31, 1917, the number of pa- 
tients treated in the Lying-in hospitals connected with the School 
was as follows: 

Number of Confinements in Hospitals 1448 

Number of Confinements, Out -Patient Department 677 

Average number of cases seen by each student of the graduating class. 15 

THE MUNICIPAL HOSPITALS— BAY VIEW. 

The clinical advantages of the University have been largely 
increased bj^ the liberal decision of the Board of Supervisors of 
City Charities to allow the immense material of these hospitals 
to be used for the purpose of medical education. There are daily 
visits and clinics in medicine and surgery by the Staff of the hos- 
pitals. The autopsy material is unsurpassed in this country in 
amount, thoroughness in study, and the use made of it in medi- 
cal teaching. 

The Municipal Hospitals consist of the following separate hospitals: 

The General Hospital, 160 beds. 

The Hospital for Chronic Cases, 88 beds. 

The Municipal Hospital for Tuberculosis, 190 beds. 

City Detention Hospital for Insane, 450 beds. 

THE PRESBYTERIAN EAR, EYE AND THROAT CHARITY HOSPITAL. 

This institution was founded in 1877, through the efforts of 
late Dr. J. J. Chisolm, then Professor of Diseases of the Eye and 
Ear in the University of Maryland. It is one of the largest special 
hospitals in the country. 

During the year 1917 there were admitted to the Dispensary 
and Hospital 9,539 persons. 

The Dispensary and wards of this hospital afford ample facili- 
ties for the study of diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 



68 CLINICAL FACILITIES 

Professor Woods and Dr. Looper are members of the staff, and 
the clinics are at all times open to the students of the University 
of Maryland. 

THE JAMES LAWRENCE KERNAN HOSPITAL AND INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL OF MARYLAND FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN. 

This institution contains seventy-five beds for the active treat- 
ment of deformities. It is situated at "Radnor Park," a colonial 
estate of sixty-five acres at Hillsdale, one mile from the western 
city limits, reached by trolley. 

This institution has city, state, endowed and private beds and 
every modern facility for the treatment of orthopedic cases as 
well as a most beautiful park-like environment and farm, and is 
closely affiliated with the University of Maryland. 

ST. VINCENT'S INFANT ASYLUM. 

The facilities of this institution, containing 250 infants and chil- 
dren, have been kindly extended to the University of Maryland 
by the Sisters of Charity. This large clinic enables this school 
to present to its students liberal opportunities for the study of dis- 
eases of infants and children. 

INSTITUTIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF THE INSANE AND FEEBLE 

MINDED. 

The Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital for the Insane. 
This institution is one of the most modern hospitals for the treatment 
and care of the insane in this country. It is well endowed and its super- 
intendent is Dr. Edward N. Brush, Professor of Psychiatry at the 
University of Maryland. In this hospital intensive treatment 
and study of mental diseases is carried on, a large number of the 
patients entering voluntarily. The students under the direction 
of Dr. Brush and his assistants in a series of clinics are shown the 
early manifestations and the various stages of mental diseases, 
the methods of treatment, and their effects. 

Mount Hope Retreat for the Insane. This hospital contains 
an average of 750 patients and is attended by Dr. Chas. G. Hill, 
Professor of Psychiatry of this faculty. Under the direction of 
Dr. Hill and his assistants the students are given opportunity for 
the study of large groups of patients showing all phases of 
various mental and nervous disorders. 



DISPENSARIES 69 

Spring Grove State Hospital. This hospital, a state institu- 
tion for the treatment of the insane, has a capacity of 780 beds. 
Dr. J. Percy Wade, associate in Psychiatry, is the superintendent. 
Students of this school are given a limited number of clinics at 
this institution. 

Springfield State Hospital. This large state institution for 
treatment of mental diseases is situated at Sykesville, Md. Dr. 
J. Clement Clark, Associate Professor of Psychiatry is its superintend- 
ent. There are accommodations for 1500 patients. At this in- 
stitution under charge of a capable director is located a modern 
psychopathic ward where intensive study of the various mental 
diseases is carried on. Each session the students of this school are 
given several clinics by Dr. Clark and his assistants. 

DISPENSARIES. 

The three dispensaries associated with the University Hospital, 
the Mercy Hospital and the Maryland General Hospital are organ- 
ized upon a uniform plan in order that the teaching may be the same 
in all. Each dispensary has the following departments: Medicine, 
Surgery, Children, Eye and Ear, Genito-Urinary, Gynecology, 
Gastro-Enterology, Neurology, Orthopedics, Proctology, Derma- 
tology, Throat and Nose, and Tuberculosis. 

All students in their junior year work in the departments of 
Medicine and Surgery each day in one of the dispensaries. 

All students in their senior year work in the special departments 
one hour each day. 

Some idea of the value of these dispensaries for clinical teaching 
is shown by the number of patients treated. For the year 1917 
nearly seventy thousand visits were made to the dispensaries. 

In addition to these the Dental Department, situated upon the 
grounds of the University, conducts a daily clinic which is open 
to medical students. 



University HosfHtal Dispensary Report, January 1, to December SI, 1917. 
John Houff, .1/ ./>., Dispensary Physician 



DEPARTMENT 


OLD CASES 


NEW CASES 


TOTAL 


Eye and ear 

Surgical 


3,001 

2,309 

2,174 

1,932 

1,383 

1,973 

987 

986 

795 

505 

485 

577 

144 

79 


1,214 

1,392 

1,162 

546 

1,076 

338 

816 

725 

872 

641 

443 

119 

155 

59 


4,275 
3,701 
3,33i 


Medical 


Genito-Urinarv 


2 478 


Skin 


2,459 
2,311 
1,803 
1,711 

1,667 
1,146 

928 


Nerve 


Obstetrics 


Women . . 


Children 


Nose and Throat 


Tuberculosis 


Orthopedics 


696 


Stomach 


299 


Rectal 


138 




17,390 


9,558 


26,948 



Mercy Hospital Dispensary Report, January 1, to December SI, 1917. 
B. S. Hanna, M.D., Resident Physician 



Surgery 

Genito-Urinary — 

Stomach 

Nose and Throat. . . 

Skin 

Diseases of Women 
Nervous Diseases. . 
General Medicine. . 

Children 

Eye and Ear 

Orthopedic 



NEW CASES 


OLD CASES 


TOTAL VISITS 


1,332 


3,970 


5,202 


1,137 


4,155 


5,292 


809 


2,230 


3,039 


609 


1,209 


1,848 


420 


1,009 


1,429 


851 


1,541 


2,392 


622 


1,621 


2,243 


1,316 


3,389 


4,705 


716 


1,452 


2,168 


730 


1,654 


2,384 


172 


369 


541 


8,714 


22,629 


31,343 



Maryland General Hospital Dispensary Report, March 1, 1917, 
1918. Emma N. Belbot, Ph.G., Registrar 


to March 1, 


DEPARTMENT 


NEW CASES 


OLD CASES 


TOTAL 


Surgical 

Medical 


575 
524 

31 
500 
450 
323 
162 
125 
300 
102 

50 


1,850 

801 

83 

1,950 

1,601 

350 

154 

168 

400 

252 

150 


2,425 
1,326